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  • 120 or 240 for the TS3660?????

    Let me first say, I am not electrically inclined at all. My wonderful wife sure is though and can do about anything she puts her mind to when it comes to electrical work.

    Anyhow, We have basic 15 amp breakers in our panel at home. It's basic 100 amp service. What would we need to change in order to set the 3660 up to run at 240V?

    Do we need to upgrade the service coming into our house or is this something that just needs to be changed at the panel and tool level?

  • #2
    Re: 120 or 240 for the TS3660?????

    As someone who is trained in the electrical trade I thought I would give you my thoughts.

    First having a 100 Amp service in this day in age with all the technology and especially now power tools you want to run would be a good reason alone to upgrade the service to 200 amps.

    Secondly, The saw at 120V really needs a 20 amp circuit to run well. A 15 amp line will under power and possibly damage the motor on the saw over time.

    Lastly, I would highly recommend getting a good electrician to come in and determine with you the overall load of outlets, lights, appliances and such. All of you may quickly come to the conclusion that you would be very wise to upgrade. At that point the electrician can put in the new service and panel and add a 240V line to your shop. With the saw running on 240V it will last longer as it will strain less overall and you will be happier in the end. The downside to all of this is the cost to have an electrician do all of this but in my mind atleast the peace of mind would be worth it.

    Hope this helps.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: 120 or 240 for the TS3660?????

      Originally posted by RHULAND View Post
      As someone who is trained in the electrical trade I thought I would give you my thoughts.

      First having a 100 Amp service in this day in age with all the technology and especially now power tools you want to run would be a good reason alone to upgrade the service to 200 amps.

      Secondly, The saw at 120V really needs a 20 amp circuit to run well. A 15 amp line will under power and possibly damage the motor on the saw over time.

      Lastly, I would highly recommend getting a good electrician to come in and determine with you the overall load of outlets, lights, appliances and such. All of you may quickly come to the conclusion that you would be very wise to upgrade. At that point the electrician can put in the new service and panel and add a 240V line to your shop. With the saw running on 240V it will last longer as it will strain less overall and you will be happier in the end. The downside to all of this is the cost to have an electrician do all of this but in my mind atleast the peace of mind would be worth it.

      Hope this helps.
      Thank you sir.....

      Upon further review i think I may have been mistaken. Some of the breakers are 15 amp and others are 20 amp. Each breaker does have 120/240 written on the front. So does that mean they will work with either120 or 240? If so would we just need to have a 240 outlet wired to a dedicated 20 amp breaker?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: 120 or 240 for the TS3660?????

        Originally posted by RHULAND View Post
        As someone who is trained in the electrical trade I thought I would give you my thoughts.

        First having a 100 Amp service in this day in age with all the technology and especially now power tools you want to run would be a good reason alone to upgrade the service to 200 amps.

        Secondly, The saw at 120V really needs a 20 amp circuit to run well. A 15 amp line will under power and possibly damage the motor on the saw over time.
        Man, your post has so much misinformation, I just had to respond.

        First of all, all new technology moves towards lower power consumption. For example appliances, switching power supplies and CFL bulbs are more efficient than ever today. CFLs draw 250-300 milliamps compared to 500-1200 milliamps in incandescent lights. LCD monitors and TVs draw 25-60 watts compared to 120-180 watts in CRT. Appliances use probaly half the current compared to 70's appliances.
        So recommending to move to 200 A is an absolutely stupid idea, total waste of money. Unless he has electric heat, his median load will be around 50 A for entire house. So his 20A table saw will work just fine.

        Secondly, if he has an old house, he probably has 12 AWG for both 15 and 20 A circuits, and even if he has 12 AWG, the breaker will trip within second of pushing anything into the blade.
        In case he has 14 gauge wire, the voltage drop over 20 or so feet at 2.5 ohms per 1000 ft will be negligent, about 4%. If he adds another 50 feet of stranded extension cord, then we are talking motor damage. Point is, his 15a breaker will trip all the time, and that is the reason not to use it, not magic motor damage.

        All he needs is a 120v 20A circuit. If he wants to be fancy he can ask an electrician to rewire a 15A circuit to 240v and help him rewire his saw.

        I don't know where you were trained but I strongly recommend to stay away from anything over 24v AC.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: 120 or 240 for the TS3660?????

          Originally posted by Tom5151 View Post
          Thank you sir.....

          Upon further review i think I may have been mistaken. Some of the breakers are 15 amp and others are 20 amp. Each breaker does have 120/240 written on the front. So does that mean they will work with either120 or 240? If so would we just need to have a 240 outlet wired to a dedicated 20 amp breaker?
          Tom, when you increase the voltage your current draw will drop approx in half. So you will be fine on a 15A circuit with 240 volts. Here's the basics:

          {electricians, don't bash me for simple explanations, I know there is true, reactive and apparent power. I'm just simplifying.}

          Imagine electric current as a flow of liquid.
          Current (I) is measured in Amperes, and in our equivalent it will be gallons per second or speed of liquid.

          Voltage (V) is equivalent to pressure.

          Power, watts, (P) is current multiplied by pressure.

          For example, you can have a hydraulic motor fed by a narrow tube (14 wire gauge), and by applying high pressure (240v) to our liquid, we gain a certain liquid flow (10 A) and we can spin the motor at certain RPM. Now, if we increase the diameter of the tube (12 gauge), we can reduce the pressure (110v ) to deliver the same amount of water because we have higher flow (20 A). Water will move slower but more of it will travel over our tubing.
          If you have a really long and narrow tube, friction of liquid against the tube walls will causes a drop in pressure. So if you use a bunch of extension cords or low gauge wire (thin wire), your voltage will drop. When voltage is too low it causes the motor to get stuck in a "starting" stage and burn out the starting windings.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: 120 or 240 for the TS3660?????

            this has been discussed a lot of late, in some form or another,

            http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sho...hlight=120+240
            http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sho...hlight=120+240
            http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sho...hlight=120+240
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