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Right Angle Impact Usage

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  • Right Angle Impact Usage

    I have been looking for a cordless ratchet for automotive repair use. I don't have space for a compressor and air tools. I already have an electric impact wrench but would like something to break nuts and bolts in tight spaces. I was looking at cordless ratchets, like those made by SnapOn and Ingersoll Rand. I then came across these right angle impact drivers. Does anyone here use the Rigid R82233 for this purpose? I am thinking that, if it is up to the task, it is better than a cordless ratchet as the impact action will prevent any kickback and therefore no busted knuckles. I also found the Makita BTL063 which looks like a superior unit, but also a much higher pricetag. The Makita uses 18v Li-Ion batteries and has a 3/8" square drive head. With the Rigid I will need an adapter for my sockets and it uses a Ni-Cad 12v battery system. I would like to hear from anyone here that uses one of these right angle impacts for automotive repair as to how it does. Is it strong enough to break most nuts and bolts free? Is it small enough to get into most spaces? Does the head on the Rigid move like the Makita does? How is the battery life? Any likes or dislike in general? How does it compare to an air ratchet? Any and all comments, opinions, and suggestions are welcome and appreciated.

  • #2
    Re: Right Angle Impact Usage

    I have the Ridgid and was considering replacing it with the Makita although the Makita has less torque. Even so, I don't think the Ridgid is powerful enough to break larger nuts and bolts. I tried to remove a lug nut on my jet ski trailer with a regular 18v impact driver (1200 in/lbs torque) and it would not budge.

    Even a small compressor (2-4 gallon) will power a 3/8 inch air ratchet. It may be worth the investment if you will be using it that often.

    Ern

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    • #3
      Re: Right Angle Impact Usage

      Thanks for the reply. I don't have space or storage for a compressor. I have an electric impact for the lugs stuff. I am looking to use this for engine work on hardware 3/8" or so and smaller. This puts out about 60 foot pounds of torque, which is about on par with the average air ratchet. This has the impact action also, which the ratchets don't. I am thinking that this tool is as good as, if not better than, the average air ratchet in terms of power. I would like to hear from someone that has used this tool for working on cars.

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