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  • Best deal yet on 3660 ?

    After reading about the 3660 on this forum, I decided to go hunting for one here in Miami, FL (we have about a dozen or so HD's)...found one at the second stop. It was in the clearance area and had about 1/8" dust on the box. Originally priced at $549 and was special ordered for a customer that backed out of the deal...HD lowered the price to $399. The manager of the tool area saw me sniffing at the box and said he was "tired of moving that thing" and "would you buy it for 40% off"...I was not sure if he meant 40% off of the original price or the $399 clearance price. He said that because they could not find the second box (rail, fence etc) he would give it to me for 40% off of $399...which is $240. I told him that I would think about it...and went searching in the bins where they keep the large boxed items...sure enough...there was a long, skinny box marked "box 2 of 2". Bought the saw for the $240 and then told the guy that I found the second box...he was so happy to see it go that he didn't even care. I tried to lift it...forget about it...it is almost 300 lbs !

    I think I may have received the best buy yet on the saw...now I just need to finish putting it together...almost done and I found 4 triangular shaped pieces of steel ( maybe 3" long) and I don't see where they go...not mentioned in the assembly instructions...did I miss something ?? Since there are four of them, I am guessing they may have something to do with the legs ?? Looks like 1/4" thick steel...anyone know what they are for ? Thanks

    artie in miami

  • #2
    Re: Best deal yet on 3660 ?

    Welcome to the forum Artie, nice score on the saw. Don't know where triangular shaped pieces go. I bought my 3650 used so it was already assembled. I'm sure someone here will be able to tell you.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Best deal yet on 3660 ?

      Great deal! Now you owe it to yourself and your new saw to spend some of that money you saved on a nice blade to give it fighting chance to be the best it can be.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Best deal yet on 3660 ?

        sounds like a good idea...can you give me some info on "good blades" please ?? I am new to the table saw world...have used them before but never owned one...I read on one of the forum posts that the blade that comes with the saw is dangerous ?? Thanks for the help.

        artie

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        • #5
          Re: Best deal yet on 3660 ?

          Yes, those pieces are for the legs.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Best deal yet on 3660 ?

            Thanks...the only place that I can figure...would be under the brackets that hold the "wheel lift assembly"...where the brackets meet the legs ?? (is that correct ??) not mentioned in the instructions for assembly...I followed them pretty closely (for a change !!)

            artie

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            • #7
              Re: Best deal yet on 3660 ?

              Originally posted by artie in miami View Post
              ...can you give me some info on "good blades" please ??
              artie
              Hi artie - Blade selection is very much proprietary to your saw and what you cut. Your saw will benefit from a good quality thin kerf blade that will put less strain on your motor because it removes less material...they're also quieter, make less dust, and waste less wood. Stay with high quality and you'll have no issues with it. This is a bit long, but hopefully helpful.

              The philosophies about which blades to get range from using at least a pair of task specific blades that will perform very well in a narrow operating range, to one "do-all" general purpose blade that will give good results in most applications but excel at none. Both philosophies have merit depending on the situation, your preference, budget, and cutting objectives. A decent purebred 60-80 tooth crosscut blade will certainly make cleaner crosscuts than a 30, 40 or 50 tooth general purpose blade of comparable quality. Inversely, a 24 tooth bulk ripper will certainly be more efficient at ripping thick material than the general purpose (GP) style blade. The key to being “better” depends on how you define that term. Better performance characteristics in one aspect of cutting doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a better choice overall, because "better" in one regard typically means worse in another. Consider both sides of the equation before making a decision. Taking the approach of using task specific blades requires owning at least two blades that each excel in a limited operating region, and are typically unacceptable for tasks outside of their intended scope. They also require blade changes for each different task for optimum results. Two task-specific blades (typically a 24T ripper and an 80T crosscutter) will generally stay sharp longer than a single general purpose blade because they share the work load, but cost more upfront and will also cost more to re-sharpen when the time comes. A general purpose blade will neither rip as efficiently as a true rip blade nor crosscut as cleanly as a dedicated crosscut blade, but you may find that it’s more than acceptable at doing both tasks for most situations. A valid argument in favor of using one high quality general purpose blade is that the GP blade leaves a cleaner edge than the rip blade, crosscuts faster than a crosscut blade, and does so with the convenience and cost of using one blade. If you happen to do cut a lot of fine veneered plywoods, veneers, melamine, MDF, plastics, etc., a blade made specifically for these materials is definitely recommended. If you tend to rip very thick dense materials regularly, then a dedicated thick ripping blade is a wise choice for you right from the start.

              I've been favorably impressed with the Infinity 010-150 50T combo, Infinity 010-060 60T Hi-ATB, Forrest 40T WWII, Forrest 30T WWII, Ridge Carbide TS2000 40T, and Freud LU88R010 60T. The Freud LU86R010 is a good value blade (the Freud TK Avanti and Diablo series are similar to the Industrial "LU" series, but have smaller carbide). The DeWalt "Precision Trim" series is a pretty good bargain too, but their "Construction" series isn't suitable for furniture making IMHO.

              The Freud LU88 is a 60T ATB TK with a 15 degree hook and a Permashield coating. True to it's categorization as a crosscut blade, it offers a very clean cut that's very low in tearout and swirl marks, and tends to be a better choice in sheetgoods and crosscuts compared to most general purpose blades. It also rips very respectably with a good feedrate in materials up to ~ 6/4" without burning due to it's steep hook angle, making it an excellent lower cost choice for many applications. It's an excellent compliment to a good 24T ripper or even the 30T WWII as a clean ripper.

              The Infinity 010-060 is a thin kerf 60T Hi-ATB with a 5° positive hook that's listed as a general purpose blade. The Hi-ATB teeth are exceptional for crosscutting, but it also rips very cleanly in material to ~ 6/4". It'll excel in fine veneered plywood, melamine, hardwood, or other laminate, and is versatile enough to be used for general purpose work. It's cleaner cutting than my Forrest WWII, TS2000, LU88, Gold Medal, DW7657, and Infinity Combomax, but it doesn't rip as aggressively. It could easily be considered a crosscut blade that has good ripping characteristics. An excellent choice if your general purpose work favors clean crosscuts and less ripping of thick materials. Also a good choice in CMS, SCMS, or RAS in addition to a TS.

              The 30T Forrest WWII has different strengths than the LU88, but is equally versatile and capable in a different range that leans toward thicker woods. It employs the same geometry as its more popular sibling, the 40T WWII, with an ATB grind, and 20° hook. It will hang with many of the 24T rippers in thick stock, while offering a significantly cleaner cut. The cut quality is remarkably close to the 40T and 50T GP blades. Since the cut quality of GP and combo blades is a compromise by design and not intended as a finished edge, IMHO the 30T WWII makes a lot of sense as a primary blade and a beneficial alternative to the 40T WWII because of its wider operating range, depending on what you cut. This is about the closest you can get to a single blade that will do it all. An excellent compliment to a good 60T or 80T Hi-ATB crosscut blade.

              The 40T Forrest WWII is the industry gold standard by which most other GP/combo blades are measured. Versatile, clean cutting, very well made, and always a pleasure to use. You'll rarely encounter a situation where this blade is out of place.

              The 50T Infinity Combomax is the best overall 50 tooth combination blade I've tried to this point. This is an extraordinarily well made blade that uses a unique ATB/R configuration that features a chamfered raker instead of the traditional flat top raker. It has very low tearout for this class of blade, and is particularly good in sheetgoods, while maintaining good ripping abilities due to it's 12° hook.

              The Ridge Carbide TS2000 is every bit the equal of the vaunted 40T WWII, and is even quite close in geometry and workmanship IMHO. Like the WWII, it's available in two kerf widths, and sports teeth that the manufacture claims are 35% thicker than their competition.

              The LU86R010 40T TK is one of my favorite bargain blades. It's readily available shipped for ~ $40. It has much in common with the higher tooth count LU88's geometry and features. It doesn't perform quite to the same level as the LU88 and other $100 performers, but considering the entire class of GP and combo blades is a design compromise, it's hard to ask for more at that price.

              My personal preference is to blend the two main philosophies and go with a higher tooth count blade that can do general purpose type work but that excels in cleaner crosscuts/plywood, and add a complimentary clean ripper that's also capable of general purpose work that excels at efficient ripping. If I were to choose two blades for that saw, I'd lean toward the Infinity 010-060, complimented by the Forrest WWII 30T. It's a very logical compromise between separate dedicated blades and general purpose blades. The combination of those two blades together offers steller performance across a very wide range of tasks, and their strengths and weaknesses compliment each other very well. You'll get super crosscuts and super plywood cuts from the 010-060, very clean rips from both, and clean thick ripping to ~ 2-1/2" from the WWII 30T. Those two put you on the higher end in price, but I doubt you can do much better and still retain the benefit of have good versatility....either blade could be left on the saw for most applications without the need to change them out. Neither of these blades suffers the limited range that pure dedicated blades have, but they offer a taste of the performance of dedicated blades. Something like the Freud LU87R010 could be substituted for the WWII 30T if you need to shave costs or if you regularly cut very thick hardwoods...it won't cut as cleanly, and doesn't offer the same versatility, but it will rip thick stock very efficiently and doesn't cost much.

              If you really need to buy just one blade for now...I'd get the 010-060 if you cut a lot of ply and need clean very cuts. (The LU88 is a reasonable substitute for less money but doesn't do as well in ply). If you cut a lot of thick hardwoods, I'd lean toward the WWII 30T as a solo blade. Either of those choses leaves you with the ability to add another complimenting blade later to round out your cutting capabilities. The 40T WWII, Ridge Carbide TS2000, or Infinity 010-050 Combomax will all do alot of things well, but aren't much cleaner cutting than the 30T WWII and are more difficult to compliment with another blade without adding a lot of "overlap" capability, which really reduces the value of the complimenting blades. All of the blades mentioned here will do a good job.

              Save your stock blade for pressure treated, junk wood, laminate flooring, and heavy MDF use.

              HTH...good luck!
              Last edited by hewood; 04-01-2009, 03:58 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Best deal yet on 3660 ?

                Hewood
                thanks so much for your help...it makes perfect sense (you should have been a teacher !) I think that I will opt for the two blade plan and I am going to print out your post and staple it to the instructions for the saw. Wouldn't you know it...I was looking for a really good used table saw (unisaw or poweramatic) and could not find anything at a decent price (used unisaws start at $950 down here in Miami).
                Now that I found the deal on the Rigid, my buddy bought me an 8yr old Unisaw for $300 (said it was better than "a steal") with the upgraded fence system, 3hp motor and table extensions...and...it came with a stack of blades !! Came from a cabinet makers shop...the guy needed to vacate the warehouse and had been selling his tools off...nobody wanted to move the table saw...so he lowered the price to 300. Now, I have 2 table saws...feast or famine ! And I thought the 3660 was a beast at 300 lbs...the Delta unisaw is 500+ lbs !

                thanks again

                artie the "table saw king of miami" (who doesn't even know which direction the blade-teeth should face...but I will learn !)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Best deal yet on 3660 ?

                  Your welcome.....you're having quite a tool feast!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Best deal yet on 3660 ?

                    Heywood
                    I am doing some blade searching, and found the infinity 010-060 60 tooth blade w/ 5/8 arbor...it is listed as a "radial arm saw blade"...is that the blade you told me about ?? It lists for around $70...is that a fair price ? Thanks again !

                    artie

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Best deal yet on 3660 ?

                      Originally posted by artie in miami View Post
                      Heywood
                      I am doing some blade searching, and found the infinity 010-060 60 tooth blade w/ 5/8 arbor...it is listed as a "radial arm saw blade"...is that the blade you told me about ?? It lists for around $70...is that a fair price ? Thanks again !

                      artie
                      That's the one! It's also recommend for general purpose work on a TS....I've tried somewhere around 50 blades to date, and I really think this one is pretty amazing, and is a great match for a saw of less than 3hp. It'll handle everything but thick ripping.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Best deal yet on 3660 ?

                        After going crazy with google searches....I just realized that I could click on the name of each blade you mentioned, and there was a link to each...sometimes I am a dummy ! From the slide rule generation.

                        a

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