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Cordless Power Drills

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  • Cordless Power Drills

    I am shopping around for a cordless drill. I looked on various websites and noticed a hammer drill. What is a hammer drill? Why would I buy one?
    Also, which is better, NiMH batteries or Lithium-Ion? What's the difference?
    How would I know if I should buy a 12 volt or 18 volt drill?

    Alan

  • #2
    Re: Cordless Power Drills

    Hammer drills are generally used to drill holes in cement or stone. A good reason to buy one would be if the drill has both the hammer feature and regular drilling feature. You may not use it very often but you'll be glad you have the hammer feature when the time comes that you do need it. You'll also need to buy some hammer drill bits as they are different then the regular twist bits most people are familiar with.

    NiMH vs Lithium-Ion, Lithium batteries last long between charges but are more expensive initially. If your like me and will only use your drill for small type projects then Lithium is probably a luxury you can live without.

    12V vs 18V, again this is a run time between charges issue and torque issue. The larger and heavier 18V is more suited IMO for someone who makes their living with their tools. For the average woodworker/home owner something in the 14.4V range is usually more than adequate.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      Re: Cordless Power Drills

      Here's my take on it. I do agree with BadgerDave somewhat. Buy what you can afford based on what you expect to use it for. But, an 18v drill with lithium power will weigh the same as the typical 12v drill. Lithium packs are super light and awesome. I have the Hitachi DV18DL and it is a dream drill/driver/hammer drill. I can charge the packs and leave them in storage for months (even up to 1 year as I have tried it) and they are still between 95-100% charged. The Hitachi lithium system also has built-in over discharge protection, overcharge protection and will also kill the power to the drill if it is in a really bad bind. Later!

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      • #4
        Re: Cordless Power Drills

        I would say go with the Lithium-Ion. Why invest in older technology?

        The biggest issue was discharge over time. I leave the Ni-Cad drill in the closet for a month, when I go to use it, it is dead. Li-Ion will not do this.

        Also, with Ridgid, they offer a LIFETIME replacement warranty on their Li-Ion batteries, so it is a slightly larger up-front investment with a mid and long range payoff.

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        • #5
          Re: Cordless Power Drills

          The Ridgid "Limited Lifetime Service Agreement" (LLSA), is available on all Ridgid power tools. It only requires registration and it covers the tool, the batteries, and the charger regardless of battery type. The "warranty" is 3-years, and the LLSA, though free, requires that the purchaser register the tool.

          CWS

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          • #6
            Re: Cordless Power Drills

            Hammer drill - a rotary drill with a hammering action. The hammering action provides short, rapid hammer thrust to pulverize relatively brittle material and provide quicker drilling with less effort. Lower power units are usually titled as "hammer drills." Higher power units, usually labeled "rotary hammers," tend to be larger and provide bigger impact forces. Modern units allow the hammer and rotation functions to be used separately or in combination, i.e., hammer mode, drill mode, or both. When use in the hammer mode, the tool provides a drilling function similar to a jackhammer. It was invented by James D. Smith in 1975 after he found that a hand-held drill did not have the ability to go through the sandstone he was using during his years as a stonemason.
            Hammer drill is well suited for drilling holes in masonry or stone. It is also used to drill holes in concrete footings to pin concrete wall forms and to drill holes in concrete floors to pin wall framing. The hammering action helps to break up the masonry so that it can be removed by the drill bit's flutes.

            I think lithium is your choice anyway.
            rockwell sonicraft |rockwell sonicrafter|fein fmm blade |power tool|Fein top|tools

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            • #7
              Re: Cordless Power Drills

              As others have already said, a hammer drill isn't a must have feature unless you're going to be drilling into masonry. I would even say that I prefer not to use a hammer drill with the hammer action turned off since the drills are a bit heavier and sometimes more bulky.

              I would recommend getting a quality tool that will last rather than some no name brand designed to last just long enough to make it past a store's return policy. I think you can find a cheap drill at Harbor Freight for about $20, but don't expect too much from it.

              Ridgid is an excellent choice with the already mentioned Lifetime Service, though you really should try handling all the drills on display and see what feels better to you. Personally I found the Ridgid drills to be sturdy and easy to use, though the Milwaukee one was more comfortable for me to grip.

              If weight is a concern for you, Makita is a popular choice. I really liked how they handle, but I got a better deal on my Milwaukee set so I went with those.

              DeWalt is another solid choice that is sold just about everywhere. Lowe's is currently advertising 20% off DeWalt combo kits right now, and that can become a pretty substantial discount if you go with a larger kit.

              Or you can pick by favorite color. While Ridgid's orange is pretty cool, I like Milwaukee's red slightly more

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              • #8
                Re: Cordless Power Drills

                Originally posted by wathman View Post
                As others have already said, a hammer drill isn't a must have feature unless you're going to be drilling into masonry. I would even say that I prefer not to use a hammer drill with the hammer action turned off since the drills are a bit heavier and sometimes more bulky.

                I would recommend getting a quality tool that will last rather than some no name brand designed to last just long enough to make it past a store's return policy. I think you can find a cheap drill at Harbor Freight for about $20, but don't expect too much from it.

                Ridgid is an excellent choice with the already mentioned Lifetime Service, though you really should try handling all the drills on display and see what feels better to you. Personally I found the Ridgid drills to be sturdy and easy to use, though the Milwaukee one was more comfortable for me to grip.

                If weight is a concern for you, Makita is a popular choice. I really liked how they handle, but I got a better deal on my Milwaukee set so I went with those.

                DeWalt is another solid choice that is sold just about everywhere. Lowe's is currently advertising 20% off DeWalt combo kits right now, and that can become a pretty substantial discount if you go with a larger kit.

                Or you can pick by favorite color. While Ridgid's orange is pretty cool, I like Milwaukee's red slightly more

                I also like red one.... it's cool
                rockwell sonicraft |rockwell sonicrafter|fein fmm blade |power tool|Fein top|tools

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                • #9
                  Re: Cordless Power Drills

                  The Milwaukee 4-5 tool combo is still $349 at my local Home Depot, so you should check yours. That's a great deal, though not as good as the $275 I paid during the ultimate power deal, with the free tool by mail in, but still pretty good.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Cordless Power Drills

                    You buy a "Hammerdrill", because you are a man! Sure you may not use it, heck you don't even know what it is, but it comes with bragging rights. While your whimpy neighbors have sissy drills you have a heavyweight that can drill into masonry. You want a heavy drill because it will strengthen and build your wrists and arms. Whatever you do, DON"T buy just a drill, even a hammerdrill. You want a kit with all sorts of tools for the future, reciprocating saw, circular saw, impact! Speaking of impact, Milwaukee M18 line has a impact wrench with 450ftlbs of torque, sorry Ridgid.

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