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  • drill chuck question

    I have noticed that most battery operated drills utilize a clutch and key less chuck. I also notice the majority of corded drills do not offer any type of clutch and most often have a keyed chuck.

    Many of the newer 1/4"-3/8" corded drills may now offer a key less chuck but no clutch. Most corded 1/2" drills or hammer drills use a keyed chuck, but I understand the need for that.

    Why?

    1. Is this an engineering tool use design criteria?
    2. is this just marketing?
    3. is this to encourage the purchase of more versatile battery tools?
    4. What will the drill look like in 10 years?

    Cactus Man

  • #2
    Re: drill chuck question

    It is all about cost. A good keyed chuck cost about 1/2 of a good keyless chuck(Jacobs, LFA, Metabo etc).
    A top line drill like a Metabo B710 has a keyless chuck and slip clutch. Not a dial in the slip you want but one that slips so you do not break your arm.
    I really don't think you will see a lot of change in drills in 10 years. They may become smaller but if you look at drills from the 70's they are roughly the same as what we have today

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    • #3
      Re: drill chuck question

      I did an Internet search and Ryobi makes a corded drill with adjustable clutch although it did not get good reviews. The thoughts were that a adjuctable clutch represented less power, so the better application was on a cordless drill. I think drills have gone about as far as they can, with lithium power, built in level, LED light, magnetic bit holder and plastic body. I can't imagine what other gizmo they could work into them, but we will see.

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      • #4
        Re: drill chuck question

        Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
        I did an Internet search and Ryobi makes a corded drill with adjustable clutch although it did not get good reviews. The thoughts were that a adjuctable clutch represented less power, so the better application was on a cordless drill. I think drills have gone about as far as they can, with lithium power, built in level, LED light, magnetic bit holder and plastic body. I can't imagine what other gizmo they could work into them, but we will see.
        By the time my current power tools wear out, there better be sonic screwdrivers and hand-held laser drills!

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        • #5
          Re: drill chuck question

          I agree with WBrooks, it appears to be a reason of cost. However, I do think that the "market" for drills in the past few years has mostly focused on "cordless". In my observations, the trades are especially prone to the cordless, simply because it is much more efficient and nobody wants to waste their time looking for an outlet.

          I know that those in the service industry find it a hastle to have to ask a customer for the nearest outlet and of course for the reason that you really don't want to have to unplug somebody's kitchen TV or run an extension cords running through a kitchen, hallway, basement, etc. Likewise, I think homeowners have a tendency to follow what the "pro's do". So, with the exception of heavy-duty use, the "cordless" is where the market is and where the new development takes place; and, we Americans have always liked "gizmo's", "bells and whistles" etc. If you could stick some kind of "game" into the drill, I'm sure more than a few would consider it an "attraction" worth buying!

          I do have a Ryobi corded drill/driver (Ryobi's "Clutch Driver") that I purchased about five years ago. It is prices at around $40 and does have an adjustable clutch, keyless chuck, and even a couple of little levels built into it. Contrary to a couple of poor reviews that I've read, I consider it a nice tool and I haven't had a single problem with it. (I find some reviews get really down on a tool, if it doesn't perform as well as one that costs many times more for example, if $40 Ryobi doesn't perform as well a $200 Milwaukii, it shouldn't just be considered "Junk". My Ryobi has never let me down, overheated, etc.

          But, the convenience of my Ridgid "cordless" drills have sort of let the Ryobi and my older Craftsman corded drill, remain in their cases.

          CWS

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          • #6
            Re: drill chuck question

            Corded tools are mostly designed for and used in shop, where cordless is for job sight usage. Most of the time in a shop you don't need a clutch for drilling like you do for installing drywall and such.
            info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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            • #7
              Re: drill chuck question

              Dewalt makes a screw driver using there 2/8 industrial corded drill and its an adjustable clutch some what like on a cordless drill, and they make the drivers for drywall screws and deck screws, (slower rpm), but no chucks on them, only bit holders.

              ( I think that part of it is the cordless is a do all (the shop smith of drills),

              and cored is more job orientated as there used many times at a work station,
              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
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