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Why you have to be careful at Harbor Freight.

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  • #16
    Re: Why you have to be careful at Harbor Freight.

    [QUOTE=reConx;245326]Wow so much for their quality control for rulers. I hope the straight edge was straight and really 90 degrees. I guess its just inexpensive steel clamps and push sticks from HF for me and wood animal crafts for my kid.[/QUote

    When i was in trade school at the local college the proffesor told us to check all your squares , leveling equipment for accuracy because nothing is garonteed to be squared even a expensive square could be dropped and be knocked out of square, there are many ways to calibrate different tools and different tools need to be checked for calibration before use (auto level). If you find that your square is indeed out of square there is a certain spot were the tongue meets the blade in the corner that you can use a punch to calibrate your 2 foot framing square

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    • #17
      Re: Why you have to be careful at Harbor Freight.

      Thanks for the interesting post and photos. It's almost hard to comprehend how anyone could produce a measure that was that far off.

      I always check my measuring devices for accuracy, whether it be a steel tape, stainless ruler, even a nice yard stick (I have a maple yard stick that I acquired forty years ago, 1/4-inch thick... it was given out by one of the paper companies). And, I totally agree with the suggestion that one needs to have those markings stamped or etched, if possible. As you can seen in one of the posted pictures, the markings on the HF square are already beginning to smear.

      As far as "squares" are concerned, from experience I'm under the impression that accuracy must be an extremely difficult thing to achieve. I have a very old Craftsman framing square that I purchased back in the very early 60's. It's off by about a 1/16th at the longest arm. Good enough for framing I suppose, but I never liked using it. It's gotten fairly rusty over the years and a year or so ago I decided to purchase a new framing square. I checked every "Empire" square they had at my local home depot and couldn't find a single one that was even close to being accurate. Afterwards I went to a local hardware chain and after checking found a steel Stanley... but only after checking about eight of them.

      My primary "square" devices are a number of drafting triangles that I have acquired over the years, when I use to "illustrate" on the drawing board. Those are all right on the money, so to speak. I do have a 30-60 and a 45 stainless triangle from some rather expensive company (I think these were like about $75 a piece, back in the early 80's). Our printshop had purchased them, but they were scrapped by the manager because they were too heavy for his intended purpose. In this particular case, those triangles are quite precise, even though they have little use in the shop, other than to act as a "guage" against other so-called "square" tools.

      CWS

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      • #18
        Re: Why you have to be careful at Harbor Freight.

        My father used to work in an aluminum welding shop that made truck cap frames and boat pontoons and things like that. He always swore by craftsman tape measures because he said they bought several different brands at the shop and none of them lined up perfectly so they had some fitment issues with their products. But they bought a craftsman tape for everyone and they all matched precisely, and their productions went much more smoothly after that date.

        I have to say that I have a brand loyalty to craftsman tapes because of my father, but truthfully as long as two tapes from the same brand line up with each other, atleast you will measure and cut the same dimension no matter what the number is, right?

        I wonder if there has ever been a published shootout between the brands that would see if they measure up (yes, pun intended)?

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        • #19
          Re: Why you have to be careful at Harbor Freight.

          Put that thing on eBay as a rare find - you would be surprised how much "unique" stuff goes for.

          RC

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          • #20
            Re: Why you have to be careful at Harbor Freight.

            I already knew to be careful of anything from Harbor Freight (I would never by anything online from them - only in the store where I can check it out). But I had never heard about this "gas lighting" term before. You learn something new every day! Thanks.
            The solution to almost everything...
            A bigger hammer or... More Power!

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            • #21
              Re: Why you have to be careful at Harbor Freight.

              Originally posted by MorePower View Post
              I already knew to be careful of anything from Harbor Freight (I would never by anything online from them - only in the store where I can check it out). But I had never heard about this "gas lighting" term before. You learn something new every day! Thanks.
              Ever heard of a "toque"? Or how about "poutine"??!!

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