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  • #16
    Re: R86447 18V One Handed Recip. Saw

    Originally posted by kheim View Post
    In Reply to DRC-Wartex


    I disagree:
    Forums are about helping and not about promoting one brand over another.
    Not using the correct blade for the job that would handicap one saw vs another is not considered helpfull to anyone.
    Any lower tpi blade is a natual choice for thick lumber and is not considered special in any way, actualy not picking a low tpi blade for thick lumber would be considered special or even odd.
    Your comment on the two saws being almost the same size. I'll let that go because it speaks for itself, but does indicate some desperate thoughts on your part.
    I don't consider the Dewalt forum video bias, just poorly done with respect being truly helpful. Experienced users can see its lack of validity with out my input.
    You did bring up the bias issue, maybe I am missing a bias slant. Hmm?




    Anyhow,
    Thanks for taking the time to reply.

    Sorry that you don't agree, but that’s a good thing. This world would be really boring if we all drove the same car or bought the same colored tools.

    The 4/6tpi blade and simple math puts the two saws much closer, in the time it takes to cut the 4X6. Even if the large dewalt would cut it's time in half also, while using the Ridgid blade, the difference would still be about 45 sec. 45sec is not that big a deal unless you cut 4X6s every day with a recip. saw.

    We all have to match the tool the job. Cutting a 4X6 with a recip saw would easily warrant a 4/6 tpi or similar. A 3 to 5tpi would always be my first choice for cutting a 4x6 if using any recip saw.

    The dewalt forum video you are referring to has some merit. It does show viewers what happens when you don't select the right blade for the job.

    Going to the extreme, we could go to a fine tpi to intentionally handicap the 1/2" stroke saw even more so then in the Dewalt forum video. This would give the impression of even a greater difference in the two saws. Not a helpful or a real life measurement of what the compact saw can do but, technically accurate on paper and by your way of thinking.

    Experienced users know the saws are not the same but they also know when on the job they do what it takes to get done. I'm just showing, in experienced hands, the Ridged compact can get the big cuts done just like any larger saw, just not quite as fast, but at least twice as fast as the Dewalt forum video lead viewers to believe.

    If a person needs to cut heavy lumber faster, then a larger saw is for them.

    My feelings are, if I get to a point where I would cut a lot of thick lumber or similar, then I would not bother using a battery powered tool at all.


    In Reply to All

    Watch the two videos and decide for yourself whats good for me is just that, and nothing more.

    The Ridgid Demolition 4/6 tpi blade is a great blade for any experienced user to have with your saw at all times. I recommend everyone give it a try. It’s a great cutting blade; I would not be without it. ( I'm sure Dewalt and everyone else must make a 4/6tpi or close to it.)

    I suggest that anyone that thinks the two saws are similar in size, go try them, and don't let me, or anyone else judge the factor for you.

    I found in real world use, that the size difference was great enough to make me go with the smaller saw, giving the fact I can still cut the same stuff as the larger saws. We all know it won't cut as fast or as long, but watch my video. Decide for yourself.

    The videos purpose is to help make someone’s shopping process a little more informed.

    Ken
    all of this back and forth is interesting, but that video compares apple to oranges. Those two saws are completely different, and shouldnt be compared on times. A full size saw will cut faster because its more powerful than a compact, simple.

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    • #17
      Re: R86447 18V One Handed Recip. Saw

      The maker of the video had to be impressed with the R86447 18V One Handed Recip Saw. While not as fast a cutter with its' 1/2" stroke vs the stroke length of the comparison full-sized recip saw, the ability to effectively handle the tool with one hand and complete the types of jobs it was apparently designed to perform, plus larger jobs when necessary, is above any reproach. Because of its' weight, physical size, and how easily controlled it is when cutting, it gets carried most all of the time. It's those same factors of weight, size and control that will appeal to the occaisional user. It's been my experience that DIYers/occaisional users don't reach for the sawzall as often as they would if it was more controllable and user friendly. This tool foots the bill.

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      • #18
        Re: R86447 18V One Handed Recip. Saw

        Good call, Spinalzo. That's the kicker right there - control. You hit the nail on the head, so to speak. This tool sure seems to fill in the gap in specialty use for this.

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        • #19
          Re: R86447 18V One Handed Recip. Saw

          Originally posted by canucksartech View Post
          Good call, Spinalzo. That's the kicker right there - control. You hit the nail on the head, so to speak. This tool sure seems to fill in the gap in specialty use for this.

          Canucksartech,

          True that. I can pretty much tell you that the least used tool in the combo kit by any casual/DIY user is going to be the sawzall because of control and accuracy issues (unless you bought the Ridgid Ultimate 8 Piece Combo Kit, like I did, that has the 18V Caulking Gun as part of the kit). Now for the casual user, and professional, the one handed recip saw covers the job. For example, used it for a sink cutout through countertop underlayment instead of the jig saw and also to cut through roof sheathing for vent pipes. You know - just your normal all around stuff. I've even heard that DIYers use recip saws to prune trees with the proper blade (or in some cases without the proper blade). The video didn't focus on the "one-hand" uses of the R86447, but concentrated on the strengths of the full-sized saw - cutting big stock. This is a great saw to have in the bag.

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: R86447 18V One Handed Recip. Saw

            Yup. I'm looking to pick up the Fuego 18 volt kit, so that I can get this saw and the LED light. Then, I'll just hock off the batteries, charger, and the drill and impact on eBay or something - that way, I get the LED light and the one-handed recip for a little under $100 or so, and I get LLSA registration.

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: R86447 18V One Handed Recip. Saw

              Old thread, new idea...

              I wonder how long it would take me to cut the Dewalt recip in half with my R884? Anyone have a Dewalt I could "borrow?" I'll give it back, I promise.

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: R86447 18V One Handed Recip. Saw

                LOL.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: R86447 18V One Handed Recip. Saw

                  Originally posted by kheim View Post
                  I use my tools daily but but I don't use them for long periods of time. So I am not the best person to help anyone about run time on any cordless tool. So far it doesn't seem anything to write home about. If I had to give an opinion at this time I would say no better then average.

                  For what it is worth. My personal take on the subject of run time is this. Sometimes a long run time battery, doesn't get cycled properly over and over. Sometimes this can be worse for the battery, then a battery with a shorter run time, that gets run dead every day.

                  Sorry for the poor reply.

                  Ken
                  Your take on batteries is correct IF, IF and IF (1)you have Nicd or NiMh batteries. (2) You never let them sit discharged or hot from heavy use. Of course now that Ridgid dropped the fanned dual chargers that support the cooling that made it common to get 7 years of battery life if one followed the above practice, you pretty much cant do anything about letting them sit overheated for an hour till it finally cools naturally. (Ridgid Nicd packs are totally unique, inside there are no paper wrapped cell packed tightly together to cook themselves in their own heat, instead are trays holding bare metal cells surrounded by flowing air(if you have the original dual charger with the fan in it for this purpose.) This is how they came out with 30 min charge time and offered LTW! When other brands matched that charge time their battery life shortend by years since they are not cooled.( and none of them truly met the 30 minute claim fully same time using the same full 4A charge rate because they knew it would ruin the batteries even quicker, instead they lowered the capacity of the cells so they could charge that fast)
                  I use my tools often and heavily. Before Ridgid nicd batteries I had Bosch, Makita, Dewalt, and Milwaukee and Never got more than 2.5 years since I work them to very hot often, they literally cooked to death(they were quality batteries otherwise that if treated like above and never overheated would last much longer) I switched to Ridgid cause of the LSA , free batteries for life, unfortunately you need to read all the fine print and jump through all the hoops to actually get that, but I got 7 years out of those first two nicd batteries running strong. When lithium came out I got a planer with one, my heavy use killed it in two months totally dead. Replacements did likewise and performance was 60% of the nicds with the cutting out constantly to protect the battery. There is no forced air cooling on any lithium pack of any brand.(Makita claims to, but when you open the pack only a pencil width of air brushes one side of the cells that are shrinkwrappedand totlaly enclosed rubber forms! Totally false claim of being fanned cooled,and the battery fails at two year practically to the day of their manufacturer date code!)Metabo may be an exception they have air cooling but I havent seen the newest lithium packs inside, but their nicds were still paper wrapped hindering the forced air cooling in their older packs. Even used lightely or not at all you cant get more then 2 years from a lithium pack. Definitely READ THE FINE PRINT and IMMEDIATELY COMPLETE all the requirements for the LSA, YOU WILL NEED IT FOR SURE ON THE LITHIUM BATTERIES long before your ready to part with your tools.

                  The above methond of totally cycling batteries does not apply to lithium batteries at all, the further you discharge a lithum battery per cycle the less life span the battery will have. There is a circuit to prevent over discharging the cells that is why the tool quits when it still seems strong. Still the less you discharge it per cycle the better. Hope that helps someone and good luck to all! Troy

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