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  • Cordless Drills-Metal Gears?

    Does anyone know which cordless drills have all metal internal parts? For the drive mechanism or course.

    Thanks.

    J.C.

  • #2
    Re: Cordless Drills-Metal Gears?

    Did an Internet search and got back, Milwaukee which I was banking on and Metabo and Makita Mforce?

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    • #3
      Re: Cordless Drills-Metal Gears?

      Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
      Does anyone know which cordless drills have all metal internal parts? For the drive mechanism or course.

      Thanks.

      J.C.

      Dewalt DCD950 and DCD970. Older models of Dewalt and everyone else uses a nylon or polycarbonate sleeve for the gearbox housing. Now I will step back and let the flame war begin. I will verify if Mforce is actually "all metal" on monday.
      Last edited by DRC-Wartex; 09-13-2009, 05:51 PM.

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      • #4
        Re: Cordless Drills-Metal Gears?

        Originally posted by DRC-Wartex View Post
        Dewalt DCD950 and DCD970. Older models of Dewalt and everyone else uses a nylon or polycarbonate sleeve for the gearbox housing. Now I will step back and let the flame war begin.
        No flaming from me...yet!

        Just want to know which models do NOT use nylon or polycarbonate (fancy words for plastic) gears or components in the mechanical chain.

        Thanks.

        J.C.

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        • #5
          Re: Cordless Drills-Metal Gears?

          Found this link to an Electrician's Forum where they discuss this topic.
          http://www.electriciantalk.com/f14/c...-gearbox-8769/
          The DeWalt 1/2inch heavy duty 18volt cordless impact wrench I'm planning to buy has all metal gears and 300ft lbs of torque, now if you can get a drill chuck on this bad boy?

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          • #6
            Re: Cordless Drills-Metal Gears?

            Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
            Found this link to an Electrician's Forum where they discuss this topic.
            http://www.electriciantalk.com/f14/c...-gearbox-8769/
            The DeWalt 1/2inch heavy duty 18volt cordless impact wrench I'm planning to buy has all metal gears and 300ft lbs of torque, now if you can get a drill chuck on this bad boy?

            I have both this and 36v version. Both are about 230 ft-lbs, and you can buy an adapter from square drive to hex shank (I have one from Dewalt), but it will just break all of your bits or start hammering if they bind a little.

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            • #7
              Re: Cordless Drills-Metal Gears?

              Originally posted by DRC-Wartex View Post
              Dewalt DCD950 and DCD970. Older models of Dewalt and everyone else uses a nylon or polycarbonate sleeve for the gearbox housing. Now I will step back and let the flame war begin. I will verify if Mforce is actually "all metal" on monday.
              What does a "PolyCarbonate Sleeve for the gearbox housing" mean?

              Housing doesn't bother me that much. Should it?

              Thanks.

              J.C.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Cordless Drills-Metal Gears?

                The reducer inside is made of rings with 3 spindles with smaller gears on them, the other side of the ring is a big gear. A set of those sit inside a plastic sleeve. First of all, plastic works as insulator and when the gearbox heats up, grease softens and spreads to the sides, and metal wears out faster. The plastic sleeve also expands over time (or under load) which changes the gear alignment causing faster wear. When debris enter the gearbox (and they do, eventually) they stick to the grease on the sides, but some get between the gears and if rigid enough, push them away sometimes causing stripping or a breakdown, you basically grind everything inside until the motor stalls or spins free. Metal gearbox cools faster, withstands more abuse, lasts longer, performs better. Don't expect "epic" difference between all-metal and plastic, but only all-metal is true heavy duty.

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                • #9
                  Re: Cordless Drills-Metal Gears?

                  JC.....Did a
                  Google search on "diecast gears in Ridgid cordless drills" http://www.google.com/search?sourcei...cordless+tools which resulted in a bunch of hits claiming diecast gearbox or gear housing. I don't know if one can infer that the gears are metal from that statement......Ray

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                  • #10
                    Re: Cordless Drills-Metal Gears?

                    This is a question that I have posed a few times with regard to "marketing". I know I discussed this with more than a couple TTI/Ryobi tech supports when I first considered a few new tools back in 2003. Why manufacturer's are not more open about the components and designs of their products leaves me wondering whether their hiding something, or just not willing to take a stance, in case there's a material change in their future.

                    Frankly, the term "plastic" is a bit offensive sounding to many. But, I think that in most cases, today's resins and solid compounds offer some very distinct advantages. Many of today's products use such materials for their superior manufacturing and performance qualities. Just consider some of the automotive components, tool cases, clamps, and even firearms that are made of such materials. Of course, when using such materials it might be nice if a sentence or two could be expended on the telling of their advantages.

                    "Die-cast metal" tells me nothing, and in fact sounds a bit worse than "plastic" to me. Die-cast could be anything from so-called "white metal" to cast iron. Does "all metal gear box" mean it's made of soft aluminum or zinc, or is it machined and tempered steel?

                    Funny thing is my first power drill was this cheapo ($8) Sears "Companion" 1/4", single-speed, non-reversable, unit which uses solid bronze bearings (no ball- or needle-bearings as used in a "good" drill). Yet, IIRC, it has metal gears which I believe are steel. Anyway, that was 1967 and the beast is still running. So, what has forty years-plus "die-cast metal" given us and is die-cast metal more durable than 21st century plastic? Hopefully, product engineering has won the battle with the cost department and R & D has proven whatever materials to be the best for the particular application. (And, just in case, don't forget to go after that LLSA, if it's a Ridgid product!)

                    CWS
                    Last edited by CWSmith; 09-17-2009, 06:46 PM.

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