Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

ridgid 851150 hammerdrill

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • ridgid 851150 hammerdrill

    what's up with ridgid they appear to have discontinued the 24 volt lithium ion drill.

    ANY ONE KNOW WHY!!!

  • #2
    Re: ridgid 851150 hammerdrill

    Most of the cordless tool mfgrs introduced high voltage cordless tools a few years ago ie:Ridgid-24V, DeWalt 36V, Milwaukee 28V, Bosche 36V, etc. Most of those voltages have been eliminated or are very hard to get. All the mfgrs, including Ridgid seem to have standardised on the 18V tools.
    Welcome to the forum.....Ray

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: ridgid 851150 hammerdrill

      Originally posted by roadrashray View Post
      Most of the cordless tool mfgrs introduced high voltage cordless tools a few years ago ie:Ridgid-24V, DeWalt 36V, Milwaukee 28V, Bosche 36V, etc. Most of those voltages have been eliminated or are very hard to get. All the mfgrs, including Ridgid seem to have standardised on the 18V tools.
      Welcome to the forum.....Ray
      sigh... all manufacturers always concentrated on 18v. High voltage were created as specialty tools, and Bosch 36, Dewalt 28/36 are available from any industrial tool supplier. "Garden Variety" stores got rid of them because average consumer will not buy a $800 36v SDS hammerdrill or $450 grinder, they were there only to create product awareness. I have 36v batteries made in 2009, so no, they are not eliminated. Bosch 36v, Milwaukee V28 are widely used in europe for example. Also, Bosch doesn't have an "e" in it, mr tool expert.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: ridgid 851150 hammerdrill

        Originally posted by DRC-Wartex View Post
        sigh... all manufacturers always concentrated on 18v. High voltage were created as specialty tools, and Bosch 36, Dewalt 28/36 are available from any industrial tool supplier. "Garden Variety" stores got rid of them because average consumer will not buy a $800 36v SDS hammerdrill or $450 grinder, they were there only to create product awareness. I have 36v batteries made in 2009, so no, they are not eliminated. Bosch 36v, Milwaukee V28 are widely used in europe for example. Also, Bosch doesn't have an "e" in it, mr tool expert.
        Things apparently just can't be said nicely. While you correct his spelling, your post also has spelling and grammatical errors.

        That said, Wartex is in fact correct. You can still get them, but they are hard to find. With Ridgid, you can still actually get the 24 volt XLi batteries and such, but they are a special order (read: "expensive") purchase through Ridgid Parts. The Bosch and Milwaukee stuff still is around here and there, and the Bosch stuff has a huge market in Europe (that brand's home turf).

        With this in mind, Ray's post is also correct, in the use of "most" and "standarized". Most of these tool manufacturers tried with the go-big-or-go-home formats, and the timing worked well with a large mass-audience turning onto tools - homeowners, DIY'ers, starting to catch onto the home reno craze a few years back. And, these tool manufacturers tried to latch onto people's urges for the biggest and best. Mostly, this did fail, as the only real market for these tools are for those that really use them. So yes, the standard-setting voltage that manufacturers have settled on is 18 volts. The other stuff is mostly special order now, and/or through supply house retailers rather than through big box outlets.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: ridgid 851150 hammerdrill

          Originally posted by canucksartech View Post
          Things apparently just can't be said nicely. While you correct his spelling, your post also has spelling and grammatical errors.
          Please point them out.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: ridgid 851150 hammerdrill

            Well if "hard to find" means anything not at Home Depot, then I guess you could call them hard to find. But you can get DeWalt 28V and 36V tools and batteries at most of the service centers, or online pretty easily. I think it's the same scenario for the other brands as well.

            When they had them in Home Depot, 36V tool kits were hundreds of dollars more expensive than the equivalent 18V kits, for the same number of tools. Even considering that the higher voltage tools are a lot better, I can see that as hard to justify to someone who just wants to do some basic work in the backyard when 18V is good enough. And that's a big chunk of the Home Depot market.

            Originally posted by canucksartech View Post
            Things apparently just can't be said nicely. While you correct his spelling, your post also has spelling and grammatical errors.

            That said, Wartex is in fact correct. You can still get them, but they are hard to find. With Ridgid, you can still actually get the 24 volt XLi batteries and such, but they are a special order (read: "expensive") purchase through Ridgid Parts. The Bosch and Milwaukee stuff still is around here and there, and the Bosch stuff has a huge market in Europe (that brand's home turf).

            With this in mind, Ray's post is also correct, in the use of "most" and "standarized". Most of these tool manufacturers tried with the go-big-or-go-home formats, and the timing worked well with a large mass-audience turning onto tools - homeowners, DIY'ers, starting to catch onto the home reno craze a few years back. And, these tool manufacturers tried to latch onto people's urges for the biggest and best. Mostly, this did fail, as the only real market for these tools are for those that really use them. So yes, the standard-setting voltage that manufacturers have settled on is 18 volts. The other stuff is mostly special order now, and/or through supply house retailers rather than through big box outlets.

            Comment

            Working...
            X