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  • Tuning up an old Table Saw

    Hey guys-
    I thought I'd start a new thread on this topic. I bought a used TS2424-1 unit and want to tune it up so that it lasts me a LONG TIME, and provides some excellent results.

    I'm more of a 'Weekend Warrior' than anykind of hardcore wood working professional. However, I want my table to last and give me excellent/accurate cuts.

    I'm pretty much a newbie at tuning- have had table saws a long time- but basically bought them, put them together, and used them. I never adjusted anything. I want to make sure this thing is in great shape, as well as fairly precise.

    Right away I plan on replacing the blade (suggestions?) and de-rusting the top. Then I'll follow up with a good wax job w/ Johnson's Paste Wax on the top and rails. Other than that, I'm lost. LOL. As always, cost is a factor, so the cheaper, the better.

    Can you provide some guidance as to what I need to do to tune this up? Maybe things like clean/vacuum the motor? Align/level the table and blade, etc? Again, I have no clue how to do any of that.

    I appreciate any help you can provide on this topic!

  • #2
    Re: Tuning up an old Table Saw

    Pretty much any tune-up info you need can be found in the Owners Manual. Go through the assembly instructions slowly and carefully and in just a few hours you'll be good to go. When I assembled my saw I found it helpful to just read and then reread each step before actually proceeding to do it. I found that sometimes on the reread that the instructions became a little clearer. Even though your saw was already assembled don't take it for granted that the previous owner did everything right.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      Re: Tuning up an old Table Saw

      besides cleaning it up,
      check alignment of the blade to the table top, (usually the miter slots) and the fence to the blade,

      may consider a belt up grade, or replacement if it has been setting for some time.

      lubricate it and clean out any open gearing of resinous build up (if it used open gearing in the raise tilt system)

      I would down load the manual for most of the processes,

      http://www.ridgid.com/ASSETS/B9BE8FC...le_Saw_Man.pdf
      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
      attributed to Samuel Johnson
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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      • #4
        Re: Tuning up an old Table Saw

        ok- when you talk about open gearing- you're not referring to the motor itself, correct? You're talking about the raise/tilt mechanisms for the blade? Is there any lubricating/cleaning I can do for the motor?

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        • #5
          Re: Tuning up an old Table Saw

          Originally posted by eyal8r View Post
          ok- when you talk about open gearing- you're not referring to the motor itself, correct? You're talking about the raise/tilt mechanisms for the blade? Is there any lubricating/cleaning I can do for the motor?
          Yes, he is talking about the trunion gearing. http://www.woodworkingonline.com/200...-perfect-cuts/

          Check out the above link for a good tutorial... lots of other podcasts @ woodworkingonline.com with good info for you to look at as well.

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          • #6
            Re: Tuning up an old Table Saw

            Great! Thank you!

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            • #7
              Re: Tuning up an old Table Saw

              the motor may be able to be lubricated, some depends on the type of the motor used,

              but near the shaft on the ends there may be a small plastic plug that one can remove and add a few drips of oil on occasion, your normally feeding a felt reservoir if it is sleeve bearings,

              many times ball bearing are sealed now days,

              one can some times use some compressed air to blow out the motor, again it is some what dependent on the type of motor an it is housing , if it is a total enclosed unit there will be no cleaning except for the out side, on a drip proof motor one can usually blow out the grill type openings, keep some distance away so the force of compressed air does not damage any thing,

              manual says see motor label for lubrication directions,

              I would suggest watch the video in the link above and it looks like to me some very good information, on how to check out and tune it up also consult the manual that is posted (link) above,
              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
              attributed to Samuel Johnson
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Tuning up an old Table Saw

                The end performance is largely determined by the setup, fence to blade alignment, and blade choice.

                Lubing the trunnion gears is a good idea...I like to use white lithium grease b/c it doesn't attract saw dust. Waxing the top will reduce friction and help slow rust. Check the belt and pulley alignment, as well as the belt tension. You might also add a zero clearance insert (ZCI). An aftermarket miter gauge and/or a crosscut sled are useful upgrades too.

                A good blade can make a big difference. Blade selection is very much proprietary to your saw and what you cut. A good quality thin kerf blade will put less strain on your motor because it removes less material...they're also quieter, make less dust, and waste less wood. Stay with a high quality brand and you should have no issues with it. It's possible to spend in excess of $100 on a top notch blade, but it's not mandatory....watch for sales. Note that many manufacturers have more than one line, ranging from average to outstanding, so you can't buy based on brand name alone. I'd avoid many of the big box offerings like Skil, Marathon, Piranha, B&D, Oldham contractor series, DeWalt construction series, Workforce, Avanti and Avanti Pro (made in China, not made by Freud), and would stick with Freud (will have the Freud name and are made in Italy), Forrest, Infinity, Ridge Carbide, Ridgid Titanium, DeWalt Precision Trim (PT), Amana, or CMT. This is a bit long, but hopefully helpful.

                The philosophies about which type blade to get range from getting task-specific blades that will perform very well in a specific narrow operating range, to more of a "do-all" general purpose blade that will give good results in most applications but excel at none. Both philosophies have merit depending on the situation, your preference, budget, and cutting objectives. A decent purebred 60-80 tooth crosscut blade will certainly make cleaner crosscuts than a 30, 40 or 50 tooth general purpose blade of comparable quality. Inversely, a 24 tooth bulk ripper will certainly be more efficient at ripping thick material than the general purpose (GP) style blade. The key to being “better” depends on how you define that term. Better performance characteristics in one aspect of cutting doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a better choice overall. Consider both sides of the equation before making a decision. Taking the approach of using task specific blades requires owning at least two blades that each excel in a limited operating region, and are typically unacceptable for tasks outside of their intended scope. They also require blade changes for each different task for optimum results. Two task-specific blades (typically a 24T ripper and an 80T crosscutter) will generally stay sharp longer than a single general purpose blade because they share the work load, but cost more upfront and will also cost more to re-sharpen when the time comes. A general purpose blade will neither rip as efficiently as a true rip blade nor crosscut as cleanly as a dedicated crosscut blade, but you may find that it’s more than acceptable at doing both tasks for most situations. A valid argument in favor of using one high quality general purpose blade is that the GP blade leaves a cleaner edge than the rip blade, crosscuts faster than a crosscut blade, and does so with the convenience and cost of using one blade. If you happen to do a lot of specialty cutting of fine veneered plywoods, veneers, melamine, MDF, plastics, etc., a blade made specifically for these materials is definitely recommended. If you tend to rip very thick dense materials regularly, then a dedicated ripping blade is a wise choice for you right from the start.

                I've been favorably impressed with the Infinity 010-150 50T Combomax (currently on sale for $60), Infinity 010-060 60T Hi-ATB, Forrest 40T WWII, Forrest 30T WWII, Ridge Carbide TS2000 40T, Ridgid Titanium R1050C and R1060C (by Freud), Craftsman 32808 & 32809 (made by Freud), and the Freud LU86R010, LU83R010, LU88R010 60T, and Freud LU87 24T rip blade (the Freud TK Avanti and Diablo series are similar to the Industrial "LU" series, but have smaller carbide...both good value, but I'll repeat: be sure it says Freud...HD is now selling an "Avanti" and "Avanti Pro" line that's not made by Freud and don't bear the Freud name). The DeWalt "Precision Trim" series is a pretty good bargain on sale, but their "Construction" series isn't suitable for furniture making IMHO.

                Good luck!
                Last edited by hewood; 10-11-2009, 07:37 AM.

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                • #9
                  Re: Tuning up an old Table Saw

                  Hi Hewood-
                  WOW! That's some GREAT info! I see a lot of posters talking about getting the Freud Diablo 80T. I saw it in the store- pretty expensive! 99% of the time I'm cutting plywood, MDF, 2x4s, 1x2s, etc. So I think a solid General Purpose blade would do me fine, don't you? I don't make anything professional or furniture, etc- just little hobbies/crafts here and there. But it would be nice to have a decent blade, that's for sure.

                  Once my current project is done and out of the way, I'll be digging in on tuning up this table, adding upgrades, etc. So far, I love the table! Much better than my Craftsman 3hp!

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                  • #10
                    Re: Tuning up an old Table Saw

                    Yep, a decent general purpose blade should be fine....I use one most of the time too.

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