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drill press chuck 1/2 - 24 thread

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  • drill press chuck 1/2 - 24 thread

    Hi All,
    I have an old (1940s?) power king drill press that is missing a chuck (lost in shipping!) and the spindle is threaded 1/2-24, which a rep at Jacobs said is no longer made. Any idea where I could find a chuck that would work, or if anyone knows of adaptors or workarounds that might help? Thanks.

  • #2
    Re: drill press chuck 1/2 - 24 thread

    double check that it is not a 1/2 x20, and if it is the 24 thread I would probably take it apart and take the arbor to a machine shop and than a standard thread put on Via lathe, and get a new chuck, or have them machine an adapter (but I would take the arbor as well so they can thread the adapter on the arbor and then finish machining the adapter, so it is as true as one can make it.

    Enco sells a 1/2 x24 tap, but I have not found a chuck as of yet, I see plenty of 1/2x20 and 3/8x24 but no 1/2x24,
    if you get a low cost chuck, take it apart and get a unit that is threaded for say 3/8 by 24 and take the body to the machine shop and have it lath drilled out and taped for 1/2x24,

    If it was mine I would probably remill/turn the arbor to a 3/8x24 thread, and that way if the chuck fails in the future one can find a replacement easily,

    the last Idea I have is to mill off the end of the arbor and drill and tap out with a 1/2x20 and use a short stud to mount the a 1/2x20 thread chuck or use an adapter that is set screwed in,
    adapters
    http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?P...MITEM=240-2705
    some chucks
    http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?P...PARTPG=INLMK32
    or
    http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?PMPAGE=482&PMCTLG=00
    or
    http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?PMPAGE=481&PMCTLG=00

    looks like the chucks and adapters are on Enco catalog pages about 478 to 484

    you could look at MSC as well, http://www1.mscdirect.com/cgi/nnsrhm
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
    attributed to Samuel Johnson
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: drill press chuck 1/2 - 24 thread

      Question: Is there an arbor or is the end of the spindle threaded? Are you really sure it is 1/2 - 24 thread? If it is, you might obtain a heavy duty chuck with 5/8 - 16 threads such as a Jacobs 33BA-5/8 which is what comes on serious 1/2" capacity spade handle drills like the old DeWalt DW131 and the current Milwaukee 1660.

      You would need to somehow get the spindle to a good machine shop and have them drill and tap 1/2 - 24 threads into a short steel rod of about 3/4" diameter and then turn it down and cut the outside to 5/ 8-1 6 threads to fit the new chuck.

      I must warn you that this won't come cheap.

      Now if you have a Morse taper socket spindle as many good drill presses have, then you need to remove the arbor which the chuck is mounted on using what's called a drill drift which is a long special shape wedge. If you need more info or help, please post and I'll try to guide you along. For now I need to get a better idea of just what you have and how the spindle of your drill press is made.

      One last thing to think about: If this is a rather small drill press it could have a 1/2" capacity chuck mounted to an arbor or spindle that's actually got 3/8 - 24 threads.

      As to anything drill related having 1/2 - 24 threads that would be pretty wild and specialized. It can be made, but I would question the manufacture (back when it was new) as to why they went for special threads.

      Please see picture and click it to enlarge it. This what a Drill Drift looks like. They come in several sizes and most likely you'll want a #2 or #3 size.
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: drill press chuck 1/2 - 24 thread

        Dear BHD, Woussko,

        Wonderful, wonderful! I join up and post my first question and within hours I have helpful advice and links from two experienced members - thank-you both, I am most grateful.

        To the matter at hand, I have partially dismantled my bench drill press and find that the torque is transmitted from the top pulleys to the chuck via a 13 1/2" long, 5/8" diameter steel spindle which is fluted for 4 1/2" at its upper end (where it passes through the pulley cluster), and reduced in diameter and threaded 1/2-24 (yes, unfortunately it is definitely 24 TPI, and 12.7mm OD) for 2" at the bottom end, for the chuck. Also, the top end of this lower threaded section is where the spindle emerges from the quill, and there is a thrust ball bearing there which is held in place by a collar which is threaded on this (1/2-24) section of the spindle.

        It sounds like my easiest option would be to get most of the length of this 2" threaded section turned down in diameter and threded 3/8-24, and then buy a chuck with this thread. I see from the links you provided that some 3/8" threaded chucks will open to 1/2" (which I want). Are these likely to be robust enough for general purpose basement handyman type work? I recall that the chuck that was formerly on the machine was a pretty beefy bit of business.

        If I were to get the spindle rethreaded 3/8-24, is it likely that I could find 'off the shelf' adaptors that are threaded 3/8-24 inside and 1/2-20 or 5/8-16 outside, so that I could use a larger chuck?

        On another tack, would it be feasible to build up the existing 1/2-24 threaded section with weld material, turn it down to size, and then thread it 1/2-20?

        Any thoughts you might wish to offer would be most appreciated.

        cheers - Doshu

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: drill press chuck 1/2 - 24 thread

          I do not think building it up would be wise, as heat usually brings with it some distortions on steel, the metal warps when heated, and when welds cool they shrink and warp as well,

          If you wanted a larger thread I would make an adapter as Woussko suggested Or make one by drilling in and tapping into the arbor, and then making the end over, using a 1/2" X 20 thread, and then lock tite it in the arbor,

          If the picture is correct you really do not have the belting or the reduction for using very large bits unless in wood or soft materials,

          what I would do is take it to the machinist and show him the ideas we have suggested, and since he has the piece in hand and can see it let him give you some Ideas and with the equipment and skill let him help you make the best decision,

          (I am visualizing the piece but to have it in my hand and see the actual dimensions and knowing what is there and what I have experienced but it may not be accurate for the situation you have in hand) (a lot of what I am picturing is what my old drill press has for an arbor in it, just worked on it last week, but it is a different make and model,)
          Attached Files
          Last edited by BHD; 11-06-2009, 10:44 AM.
          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
          attributed to Samuel Johnson
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: drill press chuck 1/2 - 24 thread

            Another idea would be to have an adapter made with 1/2 X 24 internal thread and JT6 on the outside. Thread on the adapter and buy a new JT6 chuck

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