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  • Thinking of giving up on cordless?

    I have two older models of this drill and have one with a motor that smells like its burning and one that has a broken chuck that I have been using two 12" pipe wrenches to open and close it. These drills can barley handle drilling thru floor joist and drilling out pvc pipe out of fittings.The batteries don't hold a very good charge. And for what it's worth I think my money would be better spent on Ridgid's corded tools more power and power all the time keyed chucks I just wonder if they will hold up past four years?

  • #2
    Re: Thinking of giving up on cordless?

    I bought the dewalt 18 volt drill and smoked two of them right off of the bat, it was then I realized that they could only be be used for little things like putting up hangers and drilling in sheet rock or cutting holes in sheet metal, nothing more. For drilling holes for saddles in steel pipe or through wood, something that will require some "grunt" from the drill I always go to my corded milwalkee 1/2" drill. The cordless stuff just does not have the GUTS for a whole lot of hard drilling.

    I also have a dewalt 18 volt saws all that has worked great and cut a ton of cpvc sprinkler pipe, 6 and 8 inch c-900 underground water mains, some steel pipe every now and then and several 3/4" all thread rods, wood beams and metal siding. It has worked great, you just can't force feed it.

    The batteries lasted right at four years, and I bought replacements just this past spring.

    To me the cordless tools are just heavy duty TOYS that have a limit. I really don't think they were made for the hard chores.

    Not knocking ridgid since I have never owned any of their cordless tools.
    Just my personal view.

    G3

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    • #3
      Re: Thinking of giving up on cordless?

      I have a DeWalt 18V and haven't had any problem going through wood with spade bits or up to 2" holesaws. I've abused mine to the point where I have to give it a rest because it's too hot to hold, but it comes back just as good as ever. Cordless is a must for me when working in the crawl space.

      I do grab the big Milwaukee D-handle for any drilling in stone or concrete.

      Got a DeWalt cordless circ saw a while ago that I use for cutting up plywood panels. It works great. A lot lighter than my Skill 77, and plenty of grunt for 3/4 ply.

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      • #4
        Re: Thinking of giving up on cordless?

        most people who claim "i burned up a 18v drill" don't know how to use power tools and shouldn't be allowed to use them. 99% of "burned" drills are from drilling in high gear or incorrect accessories - go to any brand service center and ask. It takes a lot of torque to stall a 18v drill at 500 RPM. Dewalts are rated (dc925) at around 525 in-lbs, which is equivalent of using a 12 inch wrench and applying 44 pounds of force on the end of it.

        I have a 36v which can drill telephone poles with a 1" auger bit. If it binds in low gear, it will literally break your wrist, like a hole hawg.

        I also have a 18v dewalt DCD950 and drill anything from steel doors to 1/2" thick steel H-beams.

        18v tools are used worldwide in all industries including aerospace (NiMH Makitas on ISS) and they are only toys in the hands of a layman.

        If you are such a macho that 18v doesn't do it for you, get a 36v Bosch or Dewalt and see if you can hold on to it in low gear.

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        • #5
          Re: Thinking of giving up on cordless?

          I have both corded and cordless tools. I really think it depends on the type of tool and how it will be used. I would never want to give up my cordless "Handy" tools. When working on a ladder I do not what to be dealing with a power cord at all. When working in wet areas or outdoors, I really want the safety of a cordless tool and not have to worry about ground faults or a GFCI not working when needed. On the other hand if I need a high power power tool for long runs, then I really need to use a corded tool or have lots of charged up battery packs. I can just imagine the idea of a large chainsaw cutting through a 18" diameter oak tree trunk and being battery powered. Maybe in 50 years, but no way will that happen for now. On the other hand no way would I want an engine powered cordless tool for indoor work.

          As for premature power tool failure, sure there are some junkers out there, but I really think mostly it's users abusing their tools.

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          • #6
            Re: Thinking of giving up on cordless?

            I always have a corded back up
            Reciprocating saw and circular saw for sure.

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            • #7
              Re: Thinking of giving up on cordless?

              Originally posted by DRC-Wartex View Post
              most people who claim "i burned up a 18v drill" don't know how to use power tools and shouldn't be allowed to use them. 99% of "burned" drills are from drilling in high gear or incorrect accessories - go to any brand service center and ask. It takes a lot of torque to stall a 18v drill at 500 RPM. Dewalts are rated (dc925) at around 525 in-lbs, which is equivalent of using a 12 inch wrench and applying 44 pounds of force on the end of it.

              I have a 36v which can drill telephone poles with a 1" auger bit. If it binds in low gear, it will literally break your wrist, like a hole hawg.

              I also have a 18v dewalt DCD950 and drill anything from steel doors to 1/2" thick steel H-beams.

              18v tools are used worldwide in all industries including aerospace (NiMH Makitas on ISS) and they are only toys in the hands of a layman.

              If you are such a macho that 18v doesn't do it for you, get a 36v Bosch or Dewalt and see if you can hold on to it in low gear.

              Not trying to be "macho" just telling of my experiences. No need for the 36 volt anything, just step up to a 120 volt and carry on.
              I guess my wrist are not as strong as yours from typing on a key board all day. I most definately can hold a dewalt 18 volt drill in one hand in low gear and stall it out. I can even stall out a milwalkee 1/2" hole shooter with both hands, I am not trying to do this to tear up drills, just rather stall a drill than twist my wrist. Send me your drill and I will let the factory smoke out of it. As far as being a "layman", well I have been in the fire sprinkler business full time since 1987, what trade are you in mr. computer programmer?? now go home and play with your fire storm cordless kit
              The first one I smoked was from it getting too hot drilling a 2" hole in 3" sch. 40 pipe for a saddle, smoke just rolled out of it.
              Don't remember on the second one. Still have the cordless tools on the truck and use them when the job at hand calls for them.

              Not wanting to argue with you, but you sarted it

              G3

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Thinking of giving up on cordless?

                Originally posted by DRC-Wartex View Post
                most people who claim "i burned up a 18v drill" don't know how to use power tools and shouldn't be allowed to use them. 99% of "burned" drills are from drilling in high gear or incorrect accessories - go to any brand service center and ask. It takes a lot of torque to stall a 18v drill at 500 RPM. Dewalts are rated (dc925) at around 525 in-lbs, which is equivalent of using a 12 inch wrench and applying 44 pounds of force on the end of it.

                I have a 36v which can drill telephone poles with a 1" auger bit. If it binds in low gear, it will literally break your wrist, like a hole hawg.

                I also have a 18v dewalt DCD950 and drill anything from steel doors to 1/2" thick steel H-beams.

                18v tools are used worldwide in all industries including aerospace (NiMH Makitas on ISS) and they are only toys in the hands of a layman.

                If you are such a macho that 18v doesn't do it for you, get a 36v Bosch or Dewalt and see if you can hold on to it in low gear.
                Why do people have to be such asshats in their replies???

                How many holes do you get out of a charge when drilling the 1/2" steel H beam and what size holes are you drilling?

                Could you also give us step by step instructions on how to properly pull the trigger on a drill (cordless and corded). And please speak slowly and not in too much of a technical language because I may not understand.

                OP - IMO I think there is room for a corded and cordless in any toolbox but if you can only have one I think the corded is the only way to go.

                RC
                Last edited by RapidCut; 11-29-2009, 10:55 AM.

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                • #9
                  Re: Thinking of giving up on cordless?

                  Originally posted by Woussko View Post
                  As for premature power tool failure, sure there are some junkers out there, but I really think mostly it's users abusing their tools.
                  Couldn't agree more. There's a lemon in every batch, but they're vastly outnumbered by the ones that perform flawlessly.

                  My Milwaukee 0624-20 18v hammer drill has the following capacities listed in the op's manual:
                  1/2" steel drill bit, 1-1/8" ship (spiral) auger, 1-1/2" flat auger, and 2-1/8" hole saw. The drill, without a doubt, will fire bigger ammo, but those are the stated capacities. I seriously doubt that any Ridgid 18v ever conceived is more capable than my Milwaukee.

                  When I was a tool tech for Milwaukee we would routinely have customers come in with drills like mine that the motors and/or switches had suffered a meltdown that would do Chernobyl proud. They would threaten to switch brands, sue Milwaukee, place a curse on our offspring, and generally keep on bitching and whining like someone had peed on their grandma's headstone when they were informed that warranty would not pay for repairs to a drill that was damaged by running a FOUR INCH holesaw through double two-bys all freakin' day long.

                  Loose nut on the trigger. That was the final diagnosis.

                  But it was always the tool's fault, of course.
                  "HONK if you've never seen a gun fired from a moving Harley"

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                  • #10
                    Re: Thinking of giving up on cordless?

                    I have several Dewalt 18v drills, and have never had a problem over the 3 years of use. Never burned anything out, and still use the batteries I got with the tools 3 years ago. I use them nearly every day. I drill in aluminum, and wood primarily with bits and hole saws up to 3". With my XRP hammer drill, I do concrete as well. Never had an issue. The only time I reach for a corded drill is when doing deep or a large number of holes in concrete( the DW XRP HD is no match for a corded Bosch). These tools have been dropped from ladders and still keep ticking.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Thinking of giving up on cordless?

                      ANY tool may be used outside of it's design causing premature failure.

                      I have very little complaints about battery tools I've owned over the years because I use them within their design tolerances. I've pushed them at times, but know when to back off.

                      You have to do the same thing with CORDED tools.

                      J.C.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Thinking of giving up on cordless?

                        SEE.......that is all I was trying to say there is a time and a place for each and every tool. You just can't push the cordless tools too hard because the warrenty will always say "operater error" or in tech talk " loose nut on switch" or in the owners talk "peice of junk that did not hold up to claims made in advertisement".

                        When mine went up in smoke they were still under the "30 days no questions asked" policy that HD had at the time. I just switched them out for new units.

                        Now I am a properly torqued nut on the switch and know when to reach for the corded tools Even the handyman knows it is no match!
                        Even a shovel (cordless excavator) has its limits and you will have to call in the backhoe.

                        G3

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Thinking of giving up on cordless?

                          Originally posted by G3sprinklers View Post
                          SEE.......that is all I was trying to say there is a time and a place for each and every tool. You just can't push the cordless tools too hard because the warrenty will always say "operater error" or in tech talk " loose nut on switch" or in the owners talk "peice of junk that did not hold up to claims made in advertisement".

                          When mine went up in smoke they were still under the "30 days no questions asked" policy that HD had at the time. I just switched them out for new units.

                          Now I am a properly torqued nut on the switch and know when to reach for the corded tools Even the handyman knows it is no match!
                          Even a shovel (cordless excavator) has its limits and you will have to call in the backhoe.

                          G3



                          Got to remember that one.

                          J.C.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Thinking of giving up on cordless?

                            Originally posted by G3sprinklers View Post
                            I guess my wrist are not as strong as yours from typing on a key board all day. I most definately can hold a dewalt 18 volt drill in one hand in low gear and stall it out. I can even stall out a milwalkee 1/2" hole shooter with both hands, I am not trying to do this to tear up drills, just rather stall a drill than twist my wrist.
                            G3
                            You can stall a hole hawg? How macho! Pat yourself on the back! Programming requires a *lot* more intelligence than threading pipes for twenty years, ok?. I work in construction too, anything from framing to drywall taping, concrete and metalworking. I also own a full 36v dewalt line, 28v track saw, multiple 18v Dewalt and 12v Milwaukee tools, various Fluke clamp and multimeters and a Fluke IR thermal imager which I rent to sprinkler contractors to locate leaks. Now go play with your "value" Ridgid kit from HomeDepot sale, tough guy.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Thinking of giving up on cordless?

                              I can see why you need to be the village handyman since you can not read very well, I never said anything about a hole hawg. A hole hawg would be a hard thing to hold onto, get a catalog and and look at some tools.

                              I guess you had to buy the whole array of various brands of battery toys to play with, whats the matter none of them hold up for you. What you shelled out on all of that junk you could have bought a couple of good corded tools and been way ahead of the game money wise. I do not own any ridgid battery toys, only the dewalt 18 volt drill and saws all.

                              As far as the programming requiring more intellegence, well it is just a different field, and I do just a little more than "thread pipes", never was insulting your smarts (even the dumbest person knows something you don't). Come on out and trouble shoot a rate of rise deluge system with mercury checks for me real quick there smart guy, oh I forgot this was in a time before computers. Get over yourself.

                              I am very curious though about one thing, how do you use a thermal imager to find a leak?? I am so stupid I always just look for water on the floor.

                              JC....glad you liked that now get that furnace fixed it is going to get cold!!

                              G3
                              Last edited by G3sprinklers; 11-29-2009, 03:47 PM.

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