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  • #2
    Re: Can anyone identify this jointer?

    I am not trying to be smart here but what do you think the manual will tell you that you do not all ready know?

    or what is it your wanting to KNOW?

    besides the out feed table appears to be stationary on that version,

    I do not know if you looked up any of the other sites that were posted and with manuals for other models of jointer's or not, but there is not really much one can say, about a jointer, adjust the blades in it correctly, and the stops and Keep your fingers out of the way, it looks as if there are no dovetail gibs to adjust, on that unit, only the slide rods under the front table, the locks look simple enough, and (in 98% of all the cuts one can do on the jointer, the rear table hardly ever gets moved, the videos and the sited I posted on your other post on how to set your blades should get you into business, there is a lot of info out there on jointer's and adjusting them and setting them, if one looks,
    I really do not know what you are expecting to find in the manual, (If your missing some part, my guess is your up the creek with out the paddle, as if they do not list the unit, I am guessing they are not stocking any parts, they will or would have to be made at a machine shop or repaired, the motor looks as if you could put a different motor under it and power it if ever needed, you would need some type of stand to support the motor),

    my guess is that unit was made in the 70's may be early 80's if my memory serves me right, I remember looking at them and seeing the solid (or appears to be solid) rear table,

    here are some that are similar, these were all posted on the other post by, Bob D, or at the site he posted,
    http://www.owwm.com/pubs/222/2356.pdf

    this one seems to have more information,
    http://www.owwm.com/pubs/222/2881.pdf
    or
    http://www.owwm.com/pubs/222/2093.pdf

    how to set knives,
    http://www.owwm.com/pubs/222/1475.pdf


    http://www.owwm.com/pubs/222/599.pdf
    Last edited by BHD; 12-08-2009, 11:49 PM.
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    • #3
      Re: Can anyone identify this jointer?

      Originally posted by BHD View Post
      I am not trying to be smart here but what do you think the manual will tell you that you do not all ready know?

      or what is it your wanting to KNOW?

      besides the out feed table appears to be stationary on that version,

      I do not know if you looked up any of the other sites that were posted and with manuals for other models of jointer's or not, but there is not really much one can say, about a jointer, adjust the blades in it correctly, and the stops and Keep your fingers out of the way, it looks as if there are no gibs on that unit, only the slide rods under the front table, the locks look simple enough, and (in 98% of all the cuts one can do on the jointer, the rear table hardly ever gets moved, the videos and the sited I posted on your other post on how to set your blades should get you into business, there is a lot of info out there on jointer's and adjusting them and setting them, if one looks,
      I really do not know what you are expecting to find in the manual, (If your missing some part, my guess is your up the creek with out the paddle, as if they do not list the unit, I am guessing they are not stocking any parts, they will or would have to be made at a machine shop or repaired, the motor looks as if you could put a different motor under it and power it if ever needed, you would need some type of stand to support the motor),

      my guess is that unit was made in the 70's may be early 80's if my memory serves me right, I remember looking at them and seeing the solid (or appears to be solid) rear table,
      It's at least partly a security issue about the manual. I always feel more comfortable having the factory documentation. Especially since I'm relatively new to woodworking. There are probably some adjustments that might need to be made down the road and at least with a manual I would have some idea of what needs to be done to make those adjustments. Professionals write those manuals (or at least used to) so mostly I feel comfortabe reading the procedure to adjust something before I attempt it. Granted, years of experience count for a lot, but some people aren't able to adequately convey instructions so that a relative novice can understand them. Manual pictures are helpful often as well.

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      • #4
        Can anyone identify this jointer?

        I have a Gilbro combo 10inch Tilt top saw and 6inch jointer. The Jointer is the same as yours,but the saws are chalk an chesse.I suspect that someone has collected a saw, jointer,motor etc and made a frame to set them up as a combo unit. The saw is not familiar to me, nor is the overall layout.Was in the metals game a while ago and we used Gilbro Engineering for surface grinding.They are in Preston and had some mammoth old world grinding machines running,I wouldn't be surprised if they are decended from the original Gilbro company.
        r4i firmware

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        • #5
          Re: Can anyone identify this jointer?

          Well, the 113.xxxxx tells me it was made by Emerson Electric, Ridgid's parent company. Beyond that I don't know... do you have a date of manufacture on the nameplate? That may go a way towards identification. The last several digits appear longer than usual, but I may be wrong about that. Is that the number on the nameplate?

          It's odd that a Google search doesn't find anything beyond what appears to be your search at a couple of other websites. Usually Craftsman stuff can be traced back at least four or five decades.

          Sorry that I can't be more helpful,

          CWS

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