Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ridgid Router Magnesium Corrosion, any good fix?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ridgid Router Magnesium Corrosion, any good fix?

    Hello, I bought the Ridgid router combo a few years back. I have not used it for around a year. A few days ago I found that the motor was practically fused to the fixed base. When I finally got it apart, I saw the motor and fixed base were corroded and rough. Also, the plunge base was also corroded and it was not in contact with the router motor.

    I hit all the surfaces with a greenie scrub pad really well, and then wiped Corrosion Block over all the surfaces. For now the router is back to working great.

    Does anyone have a permanent solution, or does anyone know if Ridgid has updated this model to prevent the corrosion? If so, I will have it swapped out.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Re: Ridgid Router Magnesium Corrosion, any good fix?

    Corrosion is mainly an environmental issue not a manufacturing issue. I would look at changing the way in which you store your router.
    ================================================== ====
    All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Ridgid Router Magnesium Corrosion, any good fix?

      XRayE,

      Yep... the darn thing corrodes when exposed to humidity. Big flaw in the design I think! While "Magnesium" sounds great, I think TTI should have stuck to aluminum on this one or at least come up with some kind of treatment for the magnesium.

      I haven't had a problem with the two bases, but noticed the motor housing almost immediately after purchase and called Ridgid Customer Support about it. That was rather worthless though, as I was told by the particular individual that the motor housing was aluminum... which it definitely is NOT!

      So, is there a cure? Not anything simple, I'm afraid. I caught the corrosion early, so it was very light and I used Brasso to clean it off. Then applied Butcher's Wax. That seems to protect it a little, but still it has a tendency to gray and look spotty. I've also tried WD40 and it appears to do a bit better.

      Problem of course is that Magnesium is known to corrode easily when exposed to humidity. Here in NY's southern tier, we're talking 80 to 90 % humidity at least nine months out of the year. And, if you take to using an abrasive to remove the corrosion, you are gradually reducing the diameter of the motor housing (or increasing that of the base), in which case you will eventually wear beyond being able to securely clamp.

      At present, my basement is showing about 50% humidity in the dead of winter with the furnace coming on all too often. While that is a much better condition for the router, I still am not inclined to leaving it in the table and after every use, I plastic bag it, add some dessicant to the box, and take it up stairs and store it in a closet.

      I have a couple of aluminum base routers, as well as several iron and steel tools and none of them, left in the basement, show any signs of corrosion or even surface rust. NOT SO, with the magnesium motor housing on my 2900.

      If anyone knows of a chemical, like WD-40, that can just be sprayed on and left to dry, it would be great. I do like the R2900 router, but this Magnesium thing, has proven to be a really bad idea in my book!

      CWS

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Ridgid Router Magnesium Corrosion, any good fix?

        Originally posted by BadgerDave View Post
        Corrosion is mainly an environmental issue not a manufacturing issue. I would look at changing the way in which you store your router.

        Dave, I have read many posts by you and not to be rude but is there ever a case where you think that there is a design problem with Ridgid tools? I live in a dry climate, but many do not. How in the world is this the users fault? The CS reps do not even know what the metal type is from a posted account here.

        Actually, Ridgid is not alone in this, Bosch had this same issue with their routers and swapped out them out into all Al casting parts. A web search will show you about the recall. N/C. to fix them. This is a design problem and unless you powder-coat, plate, those parts and they are not subject to wearing off the coating, it will be a problem. Many drills ,saws, etc., use Mg without issues but it will be coated , not a contacting machined surface and will not be on a housing like a router that has constant moving metal to metal contact between base and motor during height changes. So, unless you have constant dry climate controlled conditions you will have issues. That is not realistic and it is not a cosmetic problem only.

        BOESHEILD coating spray, may help, sears has it. Boeing developed it to reduce corrosion on avation parts. Many use it on cast Iron WW tools as there is no silicone. There is also a prep spray[1st step] which is a mild acid I think, that I would be careful to check before using. I do not think you use that except on CI.

        Woodnet forum had this discussion on the Bosch router in the past.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Ridgid Router Magnesium Corrosion, any good fix?

          Originally posted by BadgerDave View Post
          Corrosion is mainly an environmental issue not a manufacturing issue. I would look at changing the way in which you store your router.
          The router is stored in a climate controlled shop, the same as my house, next to all of my other tools that have no problems with corrosion. How would you recommend I store it?

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Ridgid Router Magnesium Corrosion, any good fix?

            I have a little more info about this. The router was stored for a while with the fixed base installed. The plunge base did not have corrosion like I first reported, just a discoloration of the aluminum on the inside. I guess this is because the aluminum is machined and then untreated.

            The corrosion was only between the motor and the fixed base. Where the fixed base made contact with the motor, the metals on both were corroded, pitted and stuck together. All other areas of the motor that were not in contact with the fixed base turned dark black.

            I put a soft wire wheel on my drill and polished all bare aluminum and mag surfaces until they were shiny, and then put on a couple of coats of paste wax. The router works perfectly and looks nice again. When I am through using the router, I will take the motor out of the base and store it.

            I will see if the problem re-occurs, and if so, I will contact Ridgid about it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Ridgid Router Magnesium Corrosion, any good fix?

              Originally posted by xrayengineer View Post
              The router is stored in a climate controlled shop, the same as my house, next to all of my other tools that have no problems with corrosion. How would you recommend I store it?
              For many of my tools that I keep stored in the cases that they came in, I throw one of these packets into the case. For my climate, they work very well at preventing rust and corrosion. I also put a couple in the drawer that I keep my router bits and drill bits. Of course as with everything else in this life, YRMV.
              ================================================== ====
              All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Ridgid Router Magnesium Corrosion, any good fix?

                XRayEng,

                I noted that your corrosion was between the motor housing and the base; mine was actually in the area of the motor housing that was left exposed beyond the what was shielded by the base housing.

                In your case, I would almost think of it as electrolysis, if the metals were different, while with my pattern of corrosion it appeared to be more of exposure to a humid environment. There was definitely a pattern of corrosion that outlined the area that wasn't covered by the router base.

                Either way, it is a problem that needs to be addressed in some way.

                Badger Dave,

                Thanks for the suggestion and link. At present, I'm using those little paper packets of dessicant. The Hartville product is definitely much more practical from my point of view.

                Thanks,

                CWS

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Ridgid Router Magnesium Corrosion, any good fix?

                  CWS, insert WoodNet 15 into the special instructions box and receive an additional 15% off of the listed price. The discounted price will not show on you order but will be given at the time of billing.
                  ================================================== ====
                  All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X