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  • ALMOST ashamed to ask

    I'm looking to buy a benchtop drill press. Alot of one's I have looked at say 8" or 10" drill press. Here's the part I'm ALMOST ashamed to ask, what does the 8" or 10" refer too? If this is a stupid question note I said ALMOST cause I'm too old to let this bother me. The reason I'm looking for a benchtop DP is my lack of floor space (share the garage), but if there are issues with benchtop vs. floor model, please let me hear about them. Thanks in advance.

    Craig
    Never outsmart your common sense

  • #2
    Re: ALMOST ashamed to ask

    on a 8" if you had a disk of 8" you could drill to the center of it, or if it is a 10" you could drill to the center of a circle of 10"

    simply it is the distance of the center of the drill bit to the column of the press, divide in halve, so a 10" should have 5" of space,

    The size of a drill press is typically measured in terms of swing. Swing is defined as twice the throat distance, which is the distance from the center of the spindle to the closest edge of the pillar. For example, a 16-inch (410 mm) drill press will have an 8-inch (200 mm) throat distance. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drill
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
    attributed to Samuel Johnson
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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    • #3
      Re: ALMOST ashamed to ask

      The 8" or 10" designation refers to the widest board you could drill a hole smack dab into the middle of. Or put another way, it's twice the distance from the center of the chuck to the front of the column. At least that's what I always thought those designations meant.
      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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      • #4
        Re: ALMOST ashamed to ask

        Thanks guys

        Craig
        Never outsmart your common sense

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        • #5
          Re: ALMOST ashamed to ask

          Originally posted by Craig Moore View Post
          I'm looking to buy a benchtop drill press. Alot of one's I have looked at say 8" or 10" drill press. Here's the part I'm ALMOST ashamed to ask, what does the 8" or 10" refer too? If this is a stupid question note I said ALMOST cause I'm too old to let this bother me. The reason I'm looking for a benchtop DP is my lack of floor space (share the garage), but if there are issues with benchtop vs. floor model, please let me hear about them. Thanks in advance.

          Craig
          I bought a floor model and mounted it on casters because I was running out of Benchtop space I like the idea I can move it around easily and use the table to support an outfeed board when I use my cheap bandsaw to resaw long boards. Other than that, I could have done most drilling tasks with a benchtop one.

          Go
          Practicing at practical wood working

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          • #6
            Re: ALMOST ashamed to ask

            I've found that while benchtop drill presses don't have the size/ability to drill larger pieces, compared to that of a floor-standing model, they are a little bit better and more stable if you bolt them onto your workbench. Granted, you could also bolt down a floor standing model. But then you couldn't really move it around. Also, I still find that floor standing models have a tendency to rock/move when you're using them. A well-made and heavily anchored benchtop model just seems to me to be more stable (just make sure that your workbench is a heavy duty item itself, and also bolted down to the floor - not a little cheapie, put-together-from-a-kit workbench).

            My 2 cents.

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            • #7
              Re: ALMOST ashamed to ask

              personally I would not have a floor model with out bolting it down as top heavy as they seem to be, (few have a large enough or heavy enough base not to bolt down, IMO)

              some times placement is the key, set it up where a window or door is and you can get it in a corner or an out of the way place, but still have an option with the window or door, to have an extended length materials on it,

              I my self would have surely missed the capacity of the floor model many, many, times if I would have opted for a bench unit when I bought mine years ago, no it is not often I have needed the extra depth, or distance to the column, but it sure is frustrating to put some thing up on the table or go and adjust the table and find it will not adjust far enough and you have punt and figure out some thing else to accomplish the job,
              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
              attributed to Samuel Johnson
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: ALMOST ashamed to ask

                True. Granted, I have lots of clearance in the workshop that I use the table-top drill press. It's a large (10 feet or so long) workbench, with a benchtop vise on one end/corner, and a drill press on the other. Yes, like BHD said, clearance on the lengths of a workpiece are a major factor to consider too - it all depends on what your shop setup is.

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