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Vac Electric Shock

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  • #31
    Re: Vac Electric Shock

    Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
    i have as many vacuums as i do snakes most are used for wet pickup and concrete cutting/ slurry. i can't remember being shocked while using them even in a wet environment.

    yet there are times when i'm afraid to open the door on my truck due to static electricity.

    it's something that you're aware of when the conditions are right.
    Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
    One way to prevent static electricity is to keep the humidity up.

    Mark
    Rick, in your humid neck-of-the-woods (I know there's a "hot air" joke in there, but I'm leaving it alone! ), it doesn't surprise me that you've never had a static thing with wet pick-up.

    It's a very common thing when it's wintertime here in the Great Lakes region, and our humidity is only around 30 to 38% humidity or so, and if you're vacuuming up drywall dust or the like. Definitely not unheard of - I've experienced more than my fair share. Man, I've had times where I could noticably see the spark out of the corner of my eye, and I could actually hear the "snap!" of the spark - even over the noise of a vac and sander! But, you either deal with it (yes, ground the vac's hose, or don't, and use non-grounding shoes, etc.), or you get the anti-static / grounded hoses.

    I'm very surpised that it's never happened to the OP with his DeWalt vac, that he's never experienced this.

    Hey, maybe he has, who knows. Maybe he knows the difference between the massive shocks that you can get from such a build-up of static you get with sucking up drywall dust, and a shock from a short. All I'm saying is this seems curious to me. It does truly suck if he is actually explaining an issue with the sander he has. But again, it's in everyone's best interest for him to take it to a service center to have it checked/tested/verified, and not just screaming on here.

    Comment


    • #32
      Re: Vac Electric Shock

      NOTE: Static shocks are common
      in
      dry areas or when the relative humidity of
      the air is low. Vacuuming fine debris with
      your Vac can deposit static charge on the
      hose or on the Vac. The best remedy to
      reduce the frequency of static shocks in
      your home or when using this Vac is to
      add moisture to the air with a humidifier.

      copied from page #3 of the owners manual

      http://www.ridgid.com/ASSETS/77C3150BCC084195B655D2AD98882D4F/WD1250_12G_Man.pdf

      read it for yourself.

      rick.

      phoebe it is

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: Vac Electric Shock

        Of course he is using the WD7000 and I could not find an online manual for that model.

        Mark
        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: Vac Electric Shock

          Okay I found the correct manual and it has the same warning on the same page.

          NOTE: Static shocks are common
          in
          dry areas or when the relative humidity of
          the air is low. Vacuuming fine debris with
          your Vac can deposit static charge on the
          hose or on the Vac. The best remedy to
          reduce the frequency of static shocks in
          your home or when using this Vac is to

          add moisture to the air with a humidifier.

          http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdf...92fc07a148.pdf

          Mark
          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: Vac Electric Shock

            I've been following this thread for the last couple of days.

            I'm still concerned, as to what the source of the shock is. I don't have that particular vac, but do have the older 12 gallond Ridgid and over the last two day, I've been doing a lot of sanding with both my R2600 and my R2500 sanders. I'm using the standard larger diameter plastic hose with the Ridgid extention hose (the smaller diameter size) plugged into back of the sander in use.

            I've probably spent about three to four hours each day and the humidity in my shop is presently 35% according to the humidgraph.

            I've been wearing moccasins and on a dry Dri-Cor floor over concrete. I've not received any shocks, nor have I seen any evidence of static; but, I admit it would be tough to see unless I had the lights off.

            Perhaps his vacuum has a higher velocity than mine or perhaps his ceiling dust is more prone to static build-up than my pine sawdust might submit.

            I think it was BHD's earlier post about static electricity in wire antennas during a dust storm... adding to that, I have seen severe static build-up on my shortwave antenna (300 ft of 12 ga wire being hit by severe wind shear/rain)... and Yes, it will cause some nasty arcing in the radio shack, if it isn't disconnected and properly grounded.

            So, I have no doubt as to the probabilities of such discharge under the right conditions.

            CWS
            Last edited by CWSmith; 01-31-2010, 01:55 AM.

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: Vac Electric Shock

              I may be goofy, but...

              I always hesitated using my shop vac hooked up to my sanders directly while sanding drywall compound. At, least on larger jobs. I generally will run it through a 5 gallon bucket 1/2 filled with water, the drywall dust stays in the bucket and saves my vacuum from eating all that dust that I thought would cause premature failure and at least will save my filter from plugging up...

              While not a professional drywaller, I do quite a bit... am I wasting my time doing the bucket thing? Are the Ridgid shop vacs we're looking at designed to operate in a commercial drywall sanding environment?

              Also, I think if it's a static electricity problem... it's not Ridgid's fault. But that's just my humble opinion.

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: Vac Electric Shock

                Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
                Perhaps his vacuum has a higher velocity than mine or perhaps his ceiling dust is more prone to static build-up than my pine sawdust might submit.

                I think it was BHD's earlier post about static electricity in wire antennas during a dust storm... adding to that, I have seen severe static build-up on my shortwave antenna (300 ft of 12 ga wire being hit by severe wind shear/rain)... and Yes, it will cause some nasty arcing in the radio shack, if it isn't disconnected and properly grounded.

                So, I have no doubt as to the probabilities of such discharge under the right conditions.

                CWS
                CWS, in the same situation as you point out, I've received no notice of static in that situation either. The only times I've had it happen was when I've been sanding/vacuuming particles as fine and numerous as the plaster/drywall dust. I think that the sawdust particles are too big / too moist / not enough of them / not enough friction. Drywall dust seems to just be perfect for this condition. That, and vacuuming up likewise stuff - sand, spilled cement powder, etc. I think it's because there has to be tons of particles, and the friction generated must be greater than what can be gained from other things.

                Just a thought.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: Vac Electric Shock

                  Originally posted by iamwelty2 View Post
                  I may be goofy, but...

                  I always hesitated using my shop vac hooked up to my sanders directly while sanding drywall compound. At, least on larger jobs. I generally will run it through a 5 gallon bucket 1/2 filled with water, the drywall dust stays in the bucket and saves my vacuum from eating all that dust that I thought would cause premature failure and at least will save my filter from plugging up...

                  While not a professional drywaller, I do quite a bit... am I wasting my time doing the bucket thing? Are the Ridgid shop vacs we're looking at designed to operate in a commercial drywall sanding environment?

                  Also, I think if it's a static electricity problem... it's not Ridgid's fault. But that's just my humble opinion.
                  No, good call with the bucket thing. I've seen pro drywall guys in my area do something similar to that. It also gets rid of the static thing for the most part.

                  I'm just a masochist. I'm not a pro drywall guy by any measure of the word - I just do some small drywall stuff, like if it's no bigger than a single room, a couple corner beads, some simple taping, etc. If it's a crazy room (one with a ton of corners/edges), or if it's an overly large room, or more than just one room, then I myself, or the guy that I work with/under, will call in a couple of select local pros.

                  And I've not seen one of those guys run an electric sander without a bucket attachment that you describe, or without a specifically designed drywall vac. Most guys just use pole sanders (non-electric), and they deal with the dust. The real pro guys are so good with their mudding that they don't need to sand that much in the first place.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: Vac Electric Shock

                    Haven't run into this one myself... I'll try to ask our tech service tomorrow.

                    Josh

                    BTW... have you tried calling our tech service line yet? Just wondered if you tried contacting us somehow other than the forum first.
                    Last edited by Josh; 02-01-2010, 09:37 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: Vac Electric Shock

                      Originally posted by BOUGIEPROJECTS View Post
                      Hi All

                      Well - I decided to upgrade all my tools - Bigger jobs - Bigger clients.

                      I since have bought the :
                      Ridgid 11 Gallon 6.5 hp WD 7000
                      Ridgid 4.5 Gallon Pro Pack WD4522
                      Ridgid 10' Extension Hose VT2570 4X Pro Hose
                      Ridgid Orbit Sander R2601
                      Ridgid 1/4 Sheet Sander R2500

                      and the Brad Nailer - Don't have the manual near me at this point.

                      Basically - i thought I bought the Best - and paid over $1000 Canadian

                      WOW - Am I Pissed!

                      I am in front of one of my top clients - Bragging about my Ridgid
                      Tools - while sanding a ceiling - was a dust free thing, only to
                      receive a Shock after Shock! I looked like a total idiot!

                      I figured I would buy all Ridgid - to make sure everything is compatable
                      and would work flawlessly - Ouch!!!!

                      I then noticed on this forum - another user complained about the same
                      thing - and was suggested to " ground the hose with some make-shift
                      wire" ... and it was a common problem. This was from Ridgid.

                      Here is my reply - another common problem is switching back to DeWALT
                      and contacting a lawyer - aka Mr. Class Action. He loves large tool makers
                      and Home Depot.

                      I bought your tool with the understanding - they were the Best!
                      Take your Ground and Shove It - I never suggested I was an electrician -
                      I am a Contractor!

                      Yes - You'll quickly tell me I could have done this privately - but Thanks
                      I don't need another Dumb *** Comment - about attaching a ground to
                      a hose I just paid $50 Bucks For - Thats your Job!

                      Please settle this quick - Contact me - I won't contact you again.
                      The run around has since become boring. I am also affiliated with MANY
                      LARGE Contractor websites - and would be glad to repost this .......
                      including your reply! Welcome to Jobmate Land!

                      PS - Home Depot won't refund me - because my damn Ups has been
                      since mailed to you - for my lifetime warranty - Sucker I Am!


                      FIX THIS

                      Thanks

                      William Bougie
                      Jeeeeeeez. Another one of these guys! I don't like this thread for many reasons. He is one of those guys that keeps promising, "threatening" to do things and then he doesn't do it.
                      1) Right away, he has promised a "class action lawsuit". This guy has obviously never talked to a lawyer in his life. I would love to see just "one" of these guys actually go to a lawyer with this type of nonsense and post their result. He would quickly find out that the lawyer would be more than happy to proceed with a lawsuit, immediately after he receives a retainer of a couple of thousand dollars from this clown.
                      2)This guy doesn't understand that he is communicating with a Ridgid forum, not Ridgid management directly. He is threatening us to contact him and fix his problem immediately or he is going to proceed with all kinds of draconian measures. Somebody please tell this guy that we are a forum of Ridgid users who work together to help people who have legitimate problems and are legitimately looking for help. Most of us wouldn't be witnesses for him in his lawsuit. Hmmmm....maybe if there was enough money involved!!!
                      If he wants to threaten Ridgid management then he should send his communication to Ridgid management. They love class action lawsuit threats.
                      3)This guy is so inept he couldn't get a refund from Home Depot, with his receipt and copy of UPS code, he claims he sent to Ridgid. (He did have a receipt and copy of the UPS code didn't he?) Anybody with a semi legitimate claim can get a refund from Home Depot, unless they treat the Home Depot employee's with an angry, condescending, superior, threatening manner. That always makes employee's of any establishment want to go out of their way to be helpful. You don't think he would do that do you? Of course, the only tool out of those he listed that qualifies for the LSA is the sander.
                      4)Lastly, he promised in his very first post that "I won't contact you again", but of course he keeps prattling on, threatening, condescending and doing his best to make us want to help him. I always respond positively to that type of approach.
                      5) Of course he played the old "competitor brand card" ieewalt. Is this guy a shill for Dewalt? Who know's? It's happened before.
                      Anyway, I say good luck to this guy with his lawsuit! Handsome looking fellow by the way. He should be a good witness in front of a jury.
                      I see that some of my fellow forum members are in their usual spirit of trying to be helpful. Noting that "Mr. Class action" claims a shock when using the Ridgid sander and not when using a Dewalt sander, I was curious if there might be a difference in the grounding mechanism between the two. If his Dewalt sander is an older style? I don't claim to have any knowledge of electrical stuff, however it seems like a few years ago all mfgrs started double isolating the power tools, where the motor is totally isolated from the case. Before that, it was something different? Could that contribute to the problem?......Ray
                      Last edited by roadrashray; 01-31-2010, 01:03 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: Vac Electric Shock

                        Again the problem is he seems to be evasive as to whether his problem is static electricity or line voltage so I suspect it is not line voltage. I believe he feels he has a legitimate complaint but I suspect it has more to do with lack of experience than a defect. If he really wants a static free vacuum cleaner it appears they are available but at a much greater cost than what he paid for all of his tools.

                        Mark
                        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Re: Vac Electric Shock

                          Its common industry practice for the end user to protect themselves from static discharge.

                          Don't think so? Go spend $400,000 on a brand new vac truck. Guess what you won't find on the hose unless you spend extra $$$$.
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                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Re: Vac Electric Shock

                            If you feel any RIDGID product is faulty, you should stop using until they can be inspected by a RIDGID Service Center.
                            Please contact the RIDGID Technical Service Department @ 1-800-519-3456. or email rtctechservices@emerson.com.
                            We will direct you to a RIDGID Service Center.

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