Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

reciprocating saw blades

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • reciprocating saw blades

    there are a myriad of reciprocating saw blades on the market today.

    Milwaukee, DeWalt, Ridgid, Bosch, generic etc. to name a few.

    Let's say I'm looking at bi-metal general purpose blade 6" long with 6-12 teeth per inch.
    Nothing very fancy just a standard type blade. Let's assume the blade will fit a regular reciprocating saw..Ridgid, Milwaukee etc.

    The blade color [paint] will vary by manufacturer, yellow, white, gray, etc.

    So....other than the price variable what is the difference between brands? I have noticed a variance in the thickness of the blades from various manufactures but is that a very critical indicator of overall quality?

    My experience is a bit limited but I have used Milwaukee, DeWalt, Ridgid, and harbor freight blades of various sizes and types. I have never broken a blade and I've never experienced any specific differences other than price....

    Any insight would be helpful.


    Cactus Man

  • #2
    Re: reciprocating saw blades

    I'm not sure that many aren't the same manufacturer just labeled or painted differently.

    I've tried different types of different brands and don't see enough of a difference to say buy this or that.

    Buy by price and what common sense tells you for the job.

    J.C.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: reciprocating saw blades

      I just looked at my stash of blades, Lenox, Blu-Mol and Milwaukee. I would buy from experience and trust what has worked for me. How do we know if all bi-metals are the same? I got a call from my buddy in Florida who was raving about DeWalt "Fire & Rescue" . He was using them to trim branches, but they are not pruning blades!

      Last year I sold my corded Milwaukee SawsAll after twenty five years of occassional use. Great tool, but I have not used it much in the last several years and my 18volt Ridgid works fine for an occassional cut.

      Aside from any slight differences between manufacturers, folks should know to use the right TPI for the job.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: reciprocating saw blades

        There is a huge difference in quality from what I see. When I want to cut something, that saw blade better perform. No bending, breaking or going dull on the first cut. I keep a big selection of sawzall blades and match them carefully to each cut. I don't think I even keep a general purpose blade in the box.

        I mostly buy Lenox

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: reciprocating saw blades

          Originally posted by plumberscrack View Post
          There is a huge difference in quality from what I see. When I want to cut something, that saw blade better perform. No bending, breaking or going dull on the first cut. I keep a big selection of sawzall blades and match them carefully to each cut. I don't think I even keep a general purpose blade in the box.

          I mostly buy Lenox
          I couldn't tell any difference between Milwaukee, Lenox, or Bosch with comparable teeth design that I've used.

          Haven't used many DeWalts as I recall.

          Have used the Milwaukee Fire/Rescue Ice Hardened (I think that's the names) with the wide height and was NOT impressed at all. Short life.

          J.C.

          Comment


          • #6
            Sorry but nothing cuts Metal Like DIABLO SAW BLADES . I am a Welder . Tool
            I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

            Comment


            • rofl
              rofl commented
              Editing a comment
              Just started using the diablo steel demon blades. Cut a steel bathtub in half to remove it easier. Did great.

          • #7
            Yes They are impressive !
            I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

            Comment


            • #8
              I love the Diablo as well. Great blades.

              Comment


              • #9
                Lets face it, once they find out how good their blades are they all cut down on quality. Early days I bought a Milwaukee corded sawzall. Still got it. Back in those days Milwaukee had the best blades but thepower of the tool made them get hot real quick and then they wore out real quick. Bought a cordless Milwaukee some time later and that was good. Enough power as long as you didnt push the tool. Problem was the obvious, absolutely tish batteries. Didnt matter how good I treated them they were absolute tish. Bought some new batteries, absolute tish. So went and bought the Nimh Hilti 24volts. Absolutely sensational. Only just bought a new 22volt Li-ion one just befoer Christmas becasue the batteries are starting to get tired and not last. That baby is over 15yrs, possibly even nearly 20 years old. So back to the point. Hilti blades are probably amongst the dearest but they sure do hold up. Most important thing that most dont do is LET THE TOOL DO THE WORK. Hold it and work it, DONT PUSH IT. Lennox have some reasonable blades. Havent used Blu-mole, dont even know whether we can get them downunder. Bosch have been putting out some reasonable blades and other but you just need to try and assess for yourself. Just remeber to put them on the job sheet so the client pays for them. Good luck.

                Comment


                • #10
                  yes, the diablo carbide tooth blades are the only ones that actually cut cast iron no hub pipe.

                  Rick.
                  phoebe it is

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X