Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse

How To Post Images

Want to know the how to upload images to your posts? Image Posting Tutorial
See more
See less

Buying an air compressor. Porter Cable or Husky?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: Buying an air compressor. Porter Cable or Husky?

    I've had the Ridgid twin tank oiless for only five years now.Sits in the garage for use 2-5 times a week untill I go out on a jobsite every couple months to run the nailgun.

    It is always under pressure.It is bled of condensate at the end of the day of full use.In the garage it does not get bled so often.

    The Ridgid model I have uses an aluminum manifold which has rotted out at the seat for the regulator's washer.
    It is now useless.
    Funny how everything is engineered,just happens to were out in five years.Cheap kitchen faucets,compressors,etc.,etc.


    The manifold is 65.00 to my front door.Now why would I spend that on a deafening possibly worn out compressor when I can buy new for a few bucks more.

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Buying an air compressor. Porter Cable or Husky?

      Continued from my earlier post...

      So today, most compressors are clearly identified with their maximum pressure (PSI) capability and their flow performance in cubic feet per minute (CFM). The latter of course is defined by piston displacement (diameter and stroke) and usually gives two CFM ratings (one number at 40 psi and a second number at 90 psi)

      The numbers are important as you need to take into account the kind of work you will be doing and the particular tool's PSI and CFM requirements... both of which are stated in the tool's literature or advertising label. Generally speaking, nailers require 90 psi at less than 2 CFM. (Basicall... it's just a high-pressure ("whack"). Things like finish spraying take less pressure, but significantly higher CFM (typically 40 to 45 psi @ 8 to 10 cfm, depending on the type of spray gun.

      The other concerns with compressor choice are the whether you want portability or a large air storage tank and of course what kind of build-quality are you looking for.

      Obviously if you have a large shop, use lots of air tools or are spray finishing, and have no need for portability, then a large tank unit is perfect. With that you can pick a vertical tank (small footprint) or a horizontal. In medium-sized units under 40 gallon tanks, you can also get a unit with wheels... but, while these are mobile, they are no where near "portable".

      Portable's are more of the size that can be hand-carried, at least short distances. Some slightly larger work-site "portables" are designed in a wheel-barrel configuration so they can be moved around the work-site and with help, liftd in and out of your pick-up or van.

      Most all conventional home and work-site compressors are of a reciprocating piston design. Some are engine-driven (perfect for work-sites that lack or in which electricity is limited, but most are electric-motor driven.) In either case, the driver may be directly coupled to the compressor or may be belt driven. Most always, portables of the type used with nailers, are direct drive.

      Once your get the size and drive drive differences out of the way, there are two different design configurations that are very important to understand: Lubricated running mechanism or a non-lubricated running mechanism. "Non-lubricated", or as they are most often called, "Oil-Less" compressors are usually made of aluminum or aluminum alloy. They usually utilize a Teflon-like material in their rod bearings and in thier piston rings.

      These "oil-less" units are most often relatively lightweight (when compared to "lubricated" units. Their pistons and cylinders are most always aluminum, employing teflon-type rings to seal against the cylinder wall. But, they are exceptionally noisey, often emitting 80 dB or more. "Oil-less" compressors, generally require little maintenance, since there is no oil to be checked or changed on a periodic basis. Because there is no oil, there is less concern for cold weather operation. Unfortunately "oil-less" compressors, while often performing for several years, do have a shorter lifetime than thier "lubricated" counterparts. Teflon rings will wear out quicker than oil "lubricated" steel rings under similar operating conditions.

      "Lubricated" compressors often employ cast iron materials in their design. The crankcase (frame) holds the oil and as the crankshaft turns, there is often a "tail" located at the lower end of the piston crank which splash lubricates the crankshaft, connecting rod and cylinder and piston.

      On stationary units, cast iron is usually the primary choice of materials, but on portable units, the crankcase (frame) may be aluminum, as may the cylinder and piston... but usually in the case of an aluminum cylinder, a cast iron cylinder sleeve is employed.

      Because of the use of the heavier cast iron and the oil lubrication, "lubricated" compressor a significantly more quiet.

      (it's all relative of course, because all compressors are noisey... but at least you can stay in the same room with a lubricated unit.)

      For the same reasons, Lubricated compressors will usually have a longer life span too. However, service is higher as one must pay attention to the oil level and, like with a truck, you've got to change the oil on occasion.

      The other disadvantage to oil lubrication is the simple fact that cold weather causes some challenges. But with many of today's oils, that may not be a major hindrance.

      The last factor in making a decision is simply brand reputation and the build quality and materials used. Preferred of course would be a good old "Made in the U.S.A." unit with ASME certified tank and safety valves. Unfortunately, that's no longer the case with most brands.

      Any compressor that you buy should be at least "ITL" (Intertek Listed) international trade approval stamp on it. Ratings should be clearly marked and all components should be clearly identified with well written instruction and repair parts information. Likewise, you should ensure that you have a reputable service operation behind your purchase.

      Regardless of your compressor brand and style, you'll need to have a clear understanding of the maintenance procedures, one of the most important being to keep the condensate out of the tank and checking the safety valve system often to ensure proper operation.

      (Note that industrial-class compressors come in a variety of designs and are somewhat different than the descriptions I have provided. Centifugal, turbine, sliding-vane, and rotating lobe units are just a small example of various compression methods, beyond the commong pistion and cylinder "reciprocating" designs.

      "Non-Lubricated" recips most often employ oil-lubricated crankcases and design features which restrict that oil from reaching the "NL" cylinder. NL cylinders employ a variety of piston ring designs, including sythetic "rider" bands. Lubricated recips employ oil pumps, rifle-drilled passages to aid in lubricating the running gear/bearings, and even special lubrication pumps with thier own oil reservoirs for lubrication of the cylinder(s).

      I hope this helps,

      CWS

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Buying an air compressor. Porter Cable or Husky?

        Bringing this one back to life for an inquiry.

        The customer I'm doing this research for has a couple pieces of exercise equipment that operate off of 80-100psi with less than 2.0 CFM.

        They have a Thomas Industries Air-Pac 3/4 T-20HP.This compressor has served them well for years.It was incredibly quiet for oiless.Unfortunately it only reaches 20psi.
        I called the exercise equipment manufacture,compressor has to be oiless to prevent possible oil leakage from damaging equipment.
        I called Thomas Industries only to be informed they no longer offer this line(I'm thinking they couldn't compete with the consumer base wanting cheaper/louder).

        I will be communicating to this customer the products that come off the shelves of the various home centers.This compressor will be installed in a mechanical room adjacent to an office.It does emit some noise off of the recirculating pumps for the boiler.Yet one can hear the existing compressor running I can only imagine how much louder the new oiless are going to be.

        Does anyone have any other options.Obviously the unit would be a little more pricey due to the fact that it is not in large demand.

        Thank-You guys
        Adam

        P.S. Does anyone know if it is feasable to rebuild.I'm thinking Rubber yes,my luck the teflon crank/rod bearings would go out in a week.
        Attached Files

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Buying an air compressor. Porter Cable or Husky?

          Adam,

          Yeah, I see after doing a quick "Google" that new Thomas Air-Pac units are no longer available... I wonder about parts though. The couple of websites say "120 days" but of course there is no telling of the date that the web posting was made.

          But, it is a mechanical device and I highly suspect that like any mechanical device it can to some extent be fixed. First observation is that the unit is pretty dirty... I wonder what the intake filter looks like and then of course the condition of the piston rings/seal or whatever?

          Valves would also be a problem, if that dust build-up got past the filter. Main thing is that it needs to be opened up and inspected to see where the low volume and pressure problems are.

          Given the need, I think I'd look locally for a compressor service shop (any brand) or even a small engine repair shop with a decent mechanic. Engines and recip piston compressors are quite similar in design, with the exception that compressor don't require an ignition system of course.

          Regarding a replacement, the specifications are simple enough... all you have to do is match the specifications which are quite common for most "nailer" applications. Biggest problem of course is going to be noise, which this particular unit's main feature seems to be it's quiet operation.

          I hope this helps,

          CWS

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Buying an air compressor. Porter Cable or Husky?

            I saw this thread and will answer the original question, HUSKY =. I have never had a problem with a Porter tool...ever...though I havn't used their air compressor. I have used the Ridgid 5gal air compressor with no issues and was quite please with it. My large one is a 33gal 1.6h. My first every Husky tool is still in the box after one use. I thought about using it for target practice one of these days. What a waste of money.

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Buying an air compressor. Porter Cable or Husky?

              Again thank-you
              Tommorrow I'll be taking the advice given here and start talking to a guy who rebuilds hundreds of tools used by a major movie set builder.

              We'll see how the word comes back.

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Buying an air compressor. Porter Cable or Husky?

                Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
                Bringing this one back to life for an inquiry.

                The customer I'm doing this research for has a couple pieces of exercise equipment that operate off of 80-100psi with less than 2.0 CFM.

                They have a Thomas Industries Air-Pac 3/4 T-20HP.This compressor has served them well for years.It was incredibly quiet for oiless.Unfortunately it only reaches 20psi.
                I called the exercise equipment manufacture,compressor has to be oiless to prevent possible oil leakage from damaging equipment.
                I called Thomas Industries only to be informed they no longer offer this line(I'm thinking they couldn't compete with the consumer base wanting cheaper/louder).

                I will be communicating to this customer the products that come off the shelves of the various home centers.This compressor will be installed in a mechanical room adjacent to an office.It does emit some noise off of the recirculating pumps for the boiler.Yet one can hear the existing compressor running I can only imagine how much louder the new oiless are going to be.

                Does anyone have any other options.Obviously the unit would be a little more pricey due to the fact that it is not in large demand.

                Thank-You guys
                Adam

                P.S. Does anyone know if it is feasable to rebuild.I'm thinking Rubber yes,my luck the teflon crank/rod bearings would go out in a week.
                I have taken mine apart and it is very simple to rebuild, the reason I bought the Thomas was that it is very serviceable. Parts houses have the kits.

                I also was amazed at the change in CS now in the now basically non existent Thomac AC. This was a $400 A/C, bought it b/c it was made here. I had a tank rust out on a Twin Tank AirPAC, , obvious defective some how, since I always drain the tanks and leave them open in storage. They gave me the BS story of not responsible for the sub. who made the tanks...so they wll do nothing. Did not want to throw out the working pump/motor, so I bought a used Emglo for the tanks alone, so I could transfer the unit to, since it works great otherwise, has a real USA 1 3/4 hp Emerson motor, even the switch is a USA square D. Really is worong that they would no nothing to help me, said ther was no parts left after their move. Now I see that the have a new name. PortaNailer.

                There was rust coming out from day 1 fr. my AirPAC, Thomas said this was normal , it would stop, it never did. I think the tank never had the internal coating placed as it should. No other of my 8 A/C's ever rusted out, or have any significant coming out. I have an older cheap very noisy DeVilbiss Hodog airless[basically like the PC airless used to be] that is 20 years old, paid $99, no rust[ I still am on the first piston, I spray Dry Lube Teflon spray before each use on the piston walls], the same age EC12 Hitachi, no rust.

                I just found this;You might try contacting the "New" company Porta-Nails, as this is my A/C now. Seems they re-named themselves. I am going to try to contact them.

                PO Box 1257, Wilmington, NC 28402
                910-283-9791 * 800-634-9281 * FAX: 910-283-6264
                info@porta-nails.com


                http://www.amazon.com/Porta-Nails-50...7616802&sr=1-6
                Last edited by Andrew M.; 02-13-2011, 01:23 PM.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Buying an air compressor. Porter Cable or Husky?

                  Originally posted by Andrew M. View Post
                  I just found this;You might try contacting the "New" company Porta-Nails, as this is my A/C now. Seems they re-named themselves. I am going to try to contact them.

                  PO Box 1257, Wilmington, NC 28402
                  910-283-9791 * 800-634-9281 * FAX: 910-283-6264
                  info@porta-nails.com

                  http://www.amazon.com/Porta-Nails-50...7616802&sr=1-6
                  Thanks Andrew
                  I'll try and get a hold of them tommorrow.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X