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DP1550 - positive / negative ?

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  • DP1550 - positive / negative ?

    Hi, looking for positive or negative experiences with drill press.
    I'm looking at the DP1550 drill press at local HD.
    Then looking at the Porter Cable PCB660DP down the street at Lowes.

    Any users out there of either (or neither) of these machines can give pros or cons ?
    I'm leaning toward the Ridgid, but I'm wondering about the depth scale locking method on the Ridgid vs. the rod locking method on others.
    Any thoughts?

    Also, I like the table on the 1550, nice and thin. I do only woodworking, not metalwork.

    In general, are there any reasons why I should NOT buy the Ridgid, or is there another tool in that price range that blows it out of the water?
    I do own other Ridgid tools and am very pleased with them.
    Thanks in advance.
    -Steve
    Steve

  • #2
    Re: DP1550 - positive / negative ?

    The only shortcoming with the Ridgid DP is the motor. At only ½ HP, it's a little on the light side and may labor when using larger forstner bits for example. Other than that point, the rest of the units' specs are right there with units costing more.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      Re: DP1550 - positive / negative ?

      I have the DP1550 and use it far more than I ever thought I would. It's proved to be a very valuable tool in the workshop.

      I looked a several drill pressed before I bought the Ridgid and I haven't been sorry. For woodworking, it has proved to have plenty of power; though I must admit that I haven't tried boreing big diameter holes in Ash or anything like that.

      The setstop is on the collar, and not an adjustable rod. While some people prefer the latter, the collar lock seems natural to me and I have had no problems with using it at all.

      For woodworking, I purchased a Rockler drill press table w/fence. With a little added thought, I designed my own mount and it the Rockler table simply slides onto the Ridgid and then is fixed in position with a couple of setscrews. Makes it easy to slide on and off and the larger table/fence adds tremendously to woodworking efficiency.

      I hope this helps,

      CWS

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      • #4
        Re: DP1550 - positive / negative ?

        BadgerDave, Thanks. That's what I'm thinking too. That a little more beefy HP would make a difference, but 1/2 HP is adequate, yes?.

        CWSmith, Thanks. I'm worried that the little twisty screw-thread stop thingy is going to wear out and start slipping after hundreds of times of getting jolted by the downward pressing. I would hope not, but you say it's not been a problem so that makes me feel better that it is designed to take that kind of abuse from normal tool operation. Thanks again.
        Last edited by pemdas89; 05-19-2010, 01:12 PM.
        Steve

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        • #5
          Re: DP1550 - positive / negative ?

          Originally posted by pemdas89 View Post
          ...........That a little more beefy HP would make a difference, but 1/2 HP is adequate, yes?.
          IMO for most woodworking applications, yes, a ½ HP motor would be adequate.
          Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: DP1550 - positive / negative ?

            If you can please tell us more about the intended uses for your new drill press. Will you need to drill holes over say 1/4" in steel? What about the use of large (over 2") hole saws in wood? For my own use I needed slower spindle speeds than what the DP1550 offers and went for a nice JET but it did cost a good bit more too.

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            • #7
              Re: DP1550 - positive / negative ?

              I'm a DIY'er at home in the garage in my spare time. I like to think that having my fingers near rotating cutting tools is a good way of relaxing after a hard day at the office.
              I like to make things from wood. Mostly in process of remodeling for the house, but I hope to graduate to making some furniture pieces for the decor. I have no need for cutting metal. The workshop right now is table saw, miter, router table and a hundred hand tools. Drill press is close on the horizon along with band saw and dust collector. I'm hoping at that point I might start being able to explore some of my ideas and not get discouraged by lack of the proper tool. If I needed to run a largerer 2"+ forstner at slow speeds, I hope the 1550 is suffiecient. Don't know. Thanks!
              Steve

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              • #8
                Re: DP1550 - positive / negative ?

                pemdas89, here is a drill press speed chart that you might want to copy and keep for future reference. If you follow the suggested speed settings from that chart, you'll be amazed at how well your future drill press will work for you.

                EDIT: I'm not sure why that link doesn't work the way it should but if it doesn't work right away just refresh the page and it should come up. It did for me anyways.
                Last edited by BadgerDave; 05-19-2010, 02:51 PM.
                Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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                • #9
                  Re: DP1550 - positive / negative ?

                  Totally came through as PDF file, no problems. Already saved a copy to my desktop and will go in the drill press folder for furture reference.
                  Thank you very much.
                  From what I see, the lowest speed on the chart is 250. The DP1550 lowest speed is 300. Does that extra 50 really make that big of a differnce or would you call it a wash and it would be fine ?
                  Steve

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                  • #10
                    Re: DP1550 - positive / negative ?

                    In my humble opinion, the 50 rpm difference isn't important... at least NOT for any woodworking in my experience.

                    Picking the right speed is important, as it gets the best efficiency out of the particular cutter. It's also especially important for balance, as using a higher speed on a cutter, like a spade bit might be enough to dislodge the chuck from the taper mounting. (The 1550, like many drill presses uses a taper fit to hold the chuck to the quill.)

                    You can't use an unbalanced cutter, like the adjustable fly-cutter, on the 1550. First off, I consider them to be dangerous as h3ll, but the total un-balance will definitely cause the taper fit to loosen.

                    As far as using large cutters are concerned, I've used up to a 2-1/2 inch hole saw to cut a hole in an 3/4 oak board, with no problem. I suspect using any of the normal size Forstner bits would not be a problem, but like anything, using a dull cutter will always pose a challenge.

                    There's lots of good drill presses out there, and I just happen to think that the Ridgid DP1550 is one of them. Of course, I'm a Ridgid fan! But from a "fit and finish" point of view, the Ridgid compares very nicely and after several years of use, I'm still very happy with mine. Nice features include the wider base casting; those bolt-down ears do improve the footing. The light w/separate switch is convenient, as is the table with the thinner edges to aid in clamping (and for me... mounting of woodworking table). If you were looking for a metal-working drill press, I'd suggest another drill-press, but for woodworking, the DP1550 works great for my needs.

                    I'm sure I have some pictures of my Rockler table and it's mounting, and if you go with the Ridgid and would like, I'll gladly post those.

                    Lastly, I've been building a lot of bookcases for our new home library and drilling shelf-pin and dowel holes has been a major task, which my DP1550 has proved it's value. I've never had the the depth settings slip on me and I've found the hub-type lock/adjustment gauge quite nice.

                    I hope this helps,

                    CWS

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: DP1550 - positive / negative ?

                      Thanks CWS, I've been doing my homework and understand that the taper has to be seated properly or it will dislodge under certain conditions. Speed is the thing, and it seems to me the Ridgid has a good range of features and speeds that 9.5 out of 10 times are more than suitable for my application. I also like that thin table, makes sense to me with aux tables and clamps. I guess it was the depth stop method, seemed a bit odd to me. But never having owned a press myself I wasn't sure what to look for until I saw the difference between that and the rod stop type. I acutally went back to the Porter Cable one and tried the depth stop on that and although it made more natural sense, it was kind of hard to operate smoothly. I'm sure it's 6 one way half a dozen the other after all is said and done. Any pictures would always be appreciated. I am now leaning heavily toward the 1550. Thanks for the input.
                      Last edited by pemdas89; 05-20-2010, 06:39 AM. Reason: missing text
                      Steve

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                      • #12
                        Re: DP1550 - positive / negative ?

                        I haven't used a "rod stop" drill press since high school, which was decades ago. The "hub", as used on the Ridgid actually works quite well and can be used the conventional way, of setting the stop visually against the material and then locking the depth... or it can be "zero'd" with the rotating measurement hub, and then using the hub measurement to say, "set the stop 1/4" (or whatever) and then locking the stop.

                        Also, you can use the hub lock to actually lower the quill to a position and holding it there with the lock... thus not having to operate the quill through it's full range, if drilling several thru holes through thinner material. As I recall, you can't do that with a "rod-stop".... but, as I said earlier, it's been decades.

                        CWS

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                        • #13
                          Re: DP1550 - positive / negative ?

                          I haven't used a "rod stop" drill press since high school, which was decades ago. The "hub", as used on the Ridgid actually works quite well and can be used the conventional way, of setting the stop visually against the material and then locking the depth... or it can be "zero'd" with the rotating measurement hub, and then using the hub measurement to say, "set the stop 1/4" (or whatever) and then locking the stop.

                          Also, you can use the hub lock to actually lower the quill to a position and holding it there with the lock... thus not having to operate the quill through it's full range, if drilling several thru holes through thinner material. As I recall, you can't do that with a "rod-stop".... but, as I said earlier, it's been decades.

                          Note, you can download the manual from the DP1550 product page, here on this website.

                          CWS

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