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  • #16
    Re: Help me pick a drill

    Wow, you started off looking for a drill to occasionally drill some holes, drive some screws and for an immediate project remove a bunch of deck screws and/or "hole-drill" around them and you'd like to keep your expenditure under $200.... so here we are now talking a possible $300 and an impact driver!

    Let me simply things a bit, if I may.

    #1 I don't think you need an impact driver... I have a 14.4 volt impact that I picked up a few years ago as part of a combo. In doing a lot of renovation work on my 1887 home, I have found the impact driver total overkill as it will easily rip the head off a screw and tighten down bolts so tight that they become very difficult to loosen. They require special bits as they have the power to literally tear apart bits and drivers that are not rated for impact use. So, for normal DIY applications the impact driver is not a "must have" tool.

    #2. Cordless tools are great... but as previously advised by one of the other forum members, batteries work best and last longest when used frequently. Used on occasion, they're a pain in the butt... as you have to then wait for them to charge or recharge after a few minutes of use.

    Also, "cordless" comes at a premium price, with their battery and charger; and, they simply don't last a long time (three or four years if you maintain them well for "occasional" use. They are also quite expensive to replace.

    But that said, I have found myself loving my Ridgid cordless stuff... but "RIDGID" is the only brand that I would buy, because (once you properly register) the optional Limited Lifetime Service Agreement will replace the batteries and charger once they wear out.

    #3. Corded tool will last you decades... even when they are cheap. I have an $8 1968 Companion drill that is as cheaply made as you can get (bronze bearings instead of ball-bearings, 1/4-inch chuck, single speed, no reverse) and it works every bit as good today as it did back then. But at that cheap of a build, it heats up quickly... but it is still useable for light/medium drilling.

    I have a current modele Ryobi D40 "Clutch Driver" that has all the features of a modern "cordless". Adjustable clutch, variable speed, keyless chuck, etc. At $40 it works great and I've used it for several years. Never have to worry about it being obsolete and/or replacing batteries. I also have very nice Craftsman, that is now approaching it's 40th year... none of the features of my modern Ryobi... but it bores holes in concrete, heavy timbers and anything I ask of it.

    So, bottom line is you don't have to spend a bloody fortune, if you go corded... and it takes less time to plug them in then it takes to charge and/or replace a battery pack on your cordless. A good 12 or 25 ft extension cord is a good inexpensive option, when needed.

    If you absolutely MUST have a cordless (and I do like them and use mine often) and can fit it into your budget, then great... but my only recommendation there is to buy a Ridgid product and register for the LLSA. I'm probably just frugal... but I hate the thought of having to pay for replacement batteries a few years down the road. And of course, the question is always, "Will a replacement battery still be available for this particular tool... 10 or 15 years from now?"

    That's my opinion anyway...

    I hope it's helpful,

    CWS

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    • #17
      Re: Help me pick a drill

      Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
      Wow, you started off looking for a drill to occasionally drill some holes, drive some screws and for an immediate project remove a bunch of deck screws and/or "hole-drill" around them and you'd like to keep your expenditure under $200.... so here we are now talking a possible $300 and an impact driver!

      Let me simply things a bit, if I may.

      #1 I don't think you need an impact driver... I have a 14.4 volt impact that I picked up a few years ago as part of a combo. In doing a lot of renovation work on my 1887 home, I have found the impact driver total overkill as it will easily rip the head off a screw and tighten down bolts so tight that they become very difficult to loosen. They require special bits as they have the power to literally tear apart bits and drivers that are not rated for impact use. So, for normal DIY applications the impact driver is not a "must have" tool.

      #2. Cordless tools are great... but as previously advised by one of the other forum members, batteries work best and last longest when used frequently. Used on occasion, they're a pain in the butt... as you have to then wait for them to charge or recharge after a few minutes of use.

      Also, "cordless" comes at a premium price, with their battery and charger; and, they simply don't last a long time (three or four years if you maintain them well for "occasional" use. They are also quite expensive to replace.

      But that said, I have found myself loving my Ridgid cordless stuff... but "RIDGID" is the only brand that I would buy, because (once you properly register) the optional Limited Lifetime Service Agreement will replace the batteries and charger once they wear out.

      #3. Corded tool will last you decades... even when they are cheap. I have an $8 1968 Companion drill that is as cheaply made as you can get (bronze bearings instead of ball-bearings, 1/4-inch chuck, single speed, no reverse) and it works every bit as good today as it did back then. But at that cheap of a build, it heats up quickly... but it is still useable for light/medium drilling.

      I have a current modele Ryobi D40 "Clutch Driver" that has all the features of a modern "cordless". Adjustable clutch, variable speed, keyless chuck, etc. At $40 it works great and I've used it for several years. Never have to worry about it being obsolete and/or replacing batteries. I also have very nice Craftsman, that is now approaching it's 40th year... none of the features of my modern Ryobi... but it bores holes in concrete, heavy timbers and anything I ask of it.

      So, bottom line is you don't have to spend a bloody fortune, if you go corded... and it takes less time to plug them in then it takes to charge and/or replace a battery pack on your cordless. A good 12 or 25 ft extension cord is a good inexpensive option, when needed.

      If you absolutely MUST have a cordless (and I do like them and use mine often) and can fit it into your budget, then great... but my only recommendation there is to buy a Ridgid product and register for the LLSA. I'm probably just frugal... but I hate the thought of having to pay for replacement batteries a few years down the road. And of course, the question is always, "Will a replacement battery still be available for this particular tool... 10 or 15 years from now?"

      That's my opinion anyway...

      I hope it's helpful,

      CWS
      I understand what you are saying. I did up my price as my wife said if you are going to buy something and you think it is worth it go ahead. I started off looking at the drill only, but also like the extra power of the bigger battery. The combo kit comes with a driver and impact wrench for less than 100.00 more than just the drill which I think is a great deal. Right now I need some power to be able to remove these screws or if they break that is great as well. There are some places I would just not have access to a plug, so a corded drill will not do well for me. I have looked at the rigid and they do not have good reviews and more than likely that may be why it has a lifetime warranty. So if I have to replace a drill or battery every time I want to use it, just not worth it.

      Usually when I use my drill I use it for long periods of time and really do not want to wait for a corded one to cool down. I have had a craftsman 15.6 volt for over 10 years and still able to get batteries for it. The charge time for these drills is around 30 minutes. The charger has a built in fan on it to help cool down the battery. Also has a chip in the battery that communicates with the charger to monitor when and how much to charge. Even though you have a lifetime warranty, you have to worry will the company be around in the next 10-15 years. No company no warranty. So in the end buying any type of tool is taking a chance, but if you keep on worry about that then you should not be buying any tools.

      Also from reading and looking online Makita has a very good reviews on all their products I have looked at.
      Last edited by laurandavid; 06-07-2010, 11:22 AM.

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Help me pick a drill

        Originally posted by laurandavid View Post
        Does the impact driver do the same thing for removing screws as well? How do you like your makita? I just hear such good things about them on the net anywhere I look. That kit that comes with all of that will be a little out of my range though.
        The impact driver with the proper bit/socket will remove as well as drive in the "right" hands. The only issue I have with the Makita is the chuck because it does not hold small drill bits tight. If you have no need for the hammerdrill function which can be switched off buy the regular drill/driver to save some money/weight. CWS comments are absolutely correct depending upon your immediate needs versus future plans. I only mentioned the X3 kit in case you needed other tools. Ridgid or Ryobi have other kits available that will fit your budget

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Help me pick a drill

          I have the older style 18V hammer/drill and the 18/24v impact driver.

          Since I purchased the impact driver I can't recall the last time I used my hammer/drill.

          "THE RIGHT TOOL FOR THE RIGHT JOB" is the appropriate mantra here!

          1. The hammer part of a hammer/drill is designed to use masonry bits to drill holes in brick and concrete.
          2. the drill part is for "drilling holes" into wood, metal and soft materials.
          3. If you have the clutch design you can also drive screws using the drilling function safely with minimal screw breakage or over torquing.
          4. Size and weight plays an important role here and may influence the model you purchase.
          5. Battery VS corded is a tough decision to make. both have their virtues, limitations, and costs. The convenience of a battery unit often offsets the grief of battery maintenance, especially if you're a weekend warrior type.

          The impact driver is a versatile tool although initially it was not intended to be that.

          1. the size, weight, and work capability of an impact driver does make it a desirable tool to have in your tool box.
          2. most impact drivers I've seen are only battery operated
          3. Yes they can drive lag bolts, screws, etc into and out of just about anything.
          4. There is a learning curve to understand how to properly use the tool and not destroy bits and screws.
          5. You can even get away with drilling some holes..I'd say no larger than 1/4" with some level of safety. [but no masonry drilling]
          6. I strongly suggest you buy ACER brand bits from McFeely's or other sources as they are very durable and are not too costly.
          7. Learn how to properly screw..[no additional information will be given here on that topic..you figure it out]


          A final thought is..determine the battery/tool brand you like and stay with it. Thus you won't have a myriad of batteries and chargers to deal with.

          Ridgid, DeWalt, Milwaukee, Hilti, Ryobi, etc. all make good stuff!
          Each manufacturer has unique designs and limitations. You need to determine your specific needs...

          For example: As a homeowner that may use a drill once a month so you do not need to spend hundreds of dollars for a Hilti brand.

          As a professional using tools every day you do need a quality and reliable tool.

          Some of the differences between the twenty dollar drill and the three hundred dollar drill is mostly internal. The less expensive tools use nylon or polypropylene gears and bushings. The professional designs may use cast or metal gears and bearings...

          A Harbor Freight 3/8" corded electric drill for $20.00 if not abused can provide a homeowner many years of use.....The professional will burn it up in a few days or a week.

          So much for drills....

          Now I want to buy a new car what should I get?


          Cactus Man

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Help me pick a drill

            Here is the one I am picking up today.

            http://www.homedepot.com/Makita/h_d1...atalogId=10053

            I am sure I will be set for a long time to come.

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Help me pick a drill

              You made a good choice. Use it well, safely, and correctly.

              Cactus Man

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