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New "Commercial" Ridgid Tile Saw "The Beast", Anyone?

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  • New "Commercial" Ridgid Tile Saw "The Beast", Anyone?

    I saw online the "Beast" tile saw on Home Dumpo website.
    I have no other info, no other reviews.
    Has anyone used one or even seen one in person?
    It seems to want to be bigger and hardier than the Dewalt and the older Ridgid 10" that's available in the Home Dumpo stores.

    http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/...62&marketID=48
    Last edited by morogue; 06-07-2010, 06:47 PM.

  • #2
    Re: New "Commercial" Ridgid Tile Saw "The Beast", Anyone?

    I saw `The Beast`tonight at Home Depot. It looks like a great wet saw. Built tough. However I have not seen it in operation. Cost $999 CND. I bought the next machine down from the Beast for $799 CND. Its also a 10 inch but it doesnt have a variable motor (not sure why I need it for tile cutting) and it can rip a 24 inch tile vesus 34 inch for the beast. Both models are 15 amps. The R4010 (which is 1 model down from the beast) may be over kill for me, but I didnt want the 7 inch smaller model. I will now have to test it out!
    I had purchased a machine called a BRUTUS last week, but returned it since it would NOT cut straight no matter how it was adjusted. Its JUNK! Stay away from Brutus wet saws.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: New "Commercial" Ridgid Tile Saw "The Beast", Anyone?

      I recently purchased "The Beast" tile saw and used it on a job cutting porcelain and ceramic tile. Here is my list of pros and cons:

      Pros:
      plunge feature a major plus
      laser is helpful with angle cuts.
      separate reservoir for fresh water supply is good, allows for filling with hot water when cutting outside in the winter.
      miter gauge attachment is accurate.
      table/head seem to run true right out of the box.
      supplied blade cuts ceramic tile like butter and was average cutting porcelain.
      portability is good but is on the heavy side.
      easy to clean after use. (simply hose off)


      Cons:
      assembly instructions for stand require patience.
      too many hoses and cheap plastic valves that have already broken.
      fill valve in supply tank leaks and doesn't shut off.
      Ridgid/Home Depot don't seem to know if this is available in Canada yet despite showing many units in there distribution center(picked mine up in Woodbridge)

      In summary, the basic saw design is great but the gadgets need much improvement.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: New "Commercial" Ridgid Tile Saw "The Beast", Anyone?

        I bought the 7 inch model and really like it. I haven't done a ton and I'm not commercial in any way. Did about 500 sq. ft. in a day and a half. Ceramic and huge 18 inch porcelain cut on a diagonal. I think the 7 inch is fine for most use and seems easier to plunge with than a 10 inch. Got the saw for $400 on sale plus 10% off so it's much cheaper than the bigger ones. If price is a factor and you want a good saw then consider it. But if you do lots of commercial work then the motor upgrade and garden hose feed are nice additions.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: New "Commercial" Ridgid Tile Saw "The Beast", Anyone?

          I am concerned with overall toughness, the motor (power, for stone), table alignment (solidity and ease of readjustment), and plunge smoothness. If the hoses and other water ditties come loose, I can handle that by just getting some better metal ones.
          So, sounds like a winner overall. Just worried that it's still not better than the Dewalt, while costing a bit more...
          Last edited by morogue; 07-07-2010, 01:20 AM. Reason: oops

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: New "Commercial" Ridgid Tile Saw "The Beast", Anyone?

            I just purchased one of these after a 10 month parts fiasco with QEP trying to repair my existing saw. QEP has nice helpful people but they have no revision control on their products and no quality control at their incoming parts inspection. Most of the parts received were the wrong configuration, not compatible or damaged.


            I have unpacked and assembled the Ridgid R4090 Beast 10" commercial wet tile saw and here are a few of my observations.
            1. Plastic water supply valves are inadequate for this application. The diverter valve failed before the first use. The screw that holds the knob to the valve fractured the attachment point when it was assembled at the factory. Soon as it was moved it broke. This needs to be redesigned and retro fit parts sent to each owner as soon as possible. I contacted the customer service center in South Carolina and spoke to the supervisor, Andrea. Her statement indicated that there are no domestic parts for this saw and they cannot supply replacement parts for 90 to 120 days. The result is that I have to return the saw, 65 miles one way, to get a replacement saw and then spend the 2 hours assembling it again. My suggestion is to hold off buying this saw for 120 days until Ridgid can get their act together. Or you will need to be prepared to have to return to the Home Depot store to get parts if your saw has the same design flaw. It is short sited on Ridgid's part to have a business plan that does not anticipate this type of issue. I guess it is because the saws are produced off shore in Taiwan along with the parts. Not having the parts stops the sale of a $900 saw for a $1.50 valve. Where is the sense in that? I went to HD and they removed one from the floor model and I was on my way.
            2. The assembly instructions need a better diagram for the water supply tubes for routing purposes.
            3. Poor water supply hose hook up valve. Had to use channel locks to get the hose fitting to seat. This should be a 90 degree down pipe to take the strain off the valve assemble as the support bracket is too weak. I have now fixed this with an additional bracket and some brass pipe fittings.
            4. No pump motor tether that would allow you to stow the pump when the saw is being moved. Saves time to not have to pull the tubes each time.
            5. The water tank should have holes to accept hooks to hang the tank on when the saw is in the stowed position. These hooks could be welded to the inner wheel assembly cross member so the tank and pump can be hung on it when not in use. This would solve the challenge for item #4. I have added a threaded rod, nylon spacers and stainless hooks to the handle so it will hang from the frame when I break it down to it's storage position.
            6. I have made my first test cut and it is off square by 1/16th of an inch. I will try to square the table using the proceedure in the manual.
            Over all the saw is far better then the QEP I had before without all the design flaws of the QEP. I think I will be customizing it as I go to improve the functionality. May add an additional pump as there is not the water flow I want.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: New "Commercial" Ridgid Tile Saw "The Beast", Anyone?

              Just wondering what your guys experience is in cutting PORCELIN TILES with the Beast?, .......... any problems?, much slower to cut than ceramic?.......

              Since RIDGID does NOT recommend the Beast to be used to cut porcelin tiles.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: New "Commercial" Ridgid Tile Saw "The Beast", Anyone?

                I've cut 18" porcelain on diagonal and had no problems. I don't know why someone from Ridgid would say that it doesn't cut porcelain, the variable speed was one of the reasons for getting the saw. It even says it cuts porcelain on the box. It also cuts through stone with no problem.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: New "Commercial" Ridgid Tile Saw "The Beast", Anyone?

                  Trekhead:
                  are you sure it says it on the box?........ I thru my box out already.
                  Anyway you can post a photo of this box info?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: New "Commercial" Ridgid Tile Saw "The Beast", Anyone?

                    Here is the advertising pamphlet for the beast it says at te bottom:

                    Variable Speed Dial
                    Easily adjust blade speed resulting in superior cut quality on a variety of materials including glass tile and porcelain.
                    Attached Files

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: New "Commercial" Ridgid Tile Saw "The Beast", Anyone?

                      thanks Chemeng,
                      I had a chance to use my saw for the 1st time this weekend and it cut the porcelain tile without any problems at all. I did dial the speed down a bit. I am wondering just what speed I should use with different types of tile. Is there a chart somewhere? The diverter valve broke as someone else mentioned. I'd like to find a brass valve to replace it.
                      Last edited by kramer99; 10-08-2010, 01:00 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: New "Commercial" Ridgid Tile Saw "The Beast", Anyone?

                        Originally posted by PBartAZ View Post
                        I just purchased one of these after a 10 month parts fiasco with QEP trying to repair my existing saw. QEP has nice helpful people but they have no revision control on their products and no quality control at their incoming parts inspection. Most of the parts received were the wrong configuration, not compatible or damaged.


                        I have unpacked and assembled the Ridgid R4090 Beast 10" commercial wet tile saw and here are a few of my observations.
                        1. Plastic water supply valves are inadequate for this application. The diverter valve failed before the first use. The screw that holds the knob to the valve fractured the attachment point when it was assembled at the factory. Soon as it was moved it broke. This needs to be redesigned and retro fit parts sent to each owner as soon as possible. I contacted the customer service center in South Carolina and spoke to the supervisor, Andrea. Her statement indicated that there are no domestic parts for this saw and they cannot supply replacement parts for 90 to 120 days. The result is that I have to return the saw, 65 miles one way, to get a replacement saw and then spend the 2 hours assembling it again. My suggestion is to hold off buying this saw for 120 days until Ridgid can get their act together. Or you will need to be prepared to have to return to the Home Depot store to get parts if your saw has the same design flaw. It is short sited on Ridgid's part to have a business plan that does not anticipate this type of issue. I guess it is because the saws are produced off shore in Taiwan along with the parts. Not having the parts stops the sale of a $900 saw for a $1.50 valve. Where is the sense in that? I went to HD and they removed one from the floor model and I was on my way.
                        2. The assembly instructions need a better diagram for the water supply tubes for routing purposes.
                        3. Poor water supply hose hook up valve. Had to use channel locks to get the hose fitting to seat. This should be a 90 degree down pipe to take the strain off the valve assemble as the support bracket is too weak. I have now fixed this with an additional bracket and some brass pipe fittings.
                        4. No pump motor tether that would allow you to stow the pump when the saw is being moved. Saves time to not have to pull the tubes each time.
                        5. The water tank should have holes to accept hooks to hang the tank on when the saw is in the stowed position. These hooks could be welded to the inner wheel assembly cross member so the tank and pump can be hung on it when not in use. This would solve the challenge for item #4. I have added a threaded rod, nylon spacers and stainless hooks to the handle so it will hang from the frame when I break it down to it's storage position.
                        6. I have made my first test cut and it is off square by 1/16th of an inch. I will try to square the table using the proceedure in the manual.
                        Over all the saw is far better then the QEP I had before without all the design flaws of the QEP. I think I will be customizing it as I go to improve the functionality. May add an additional pump as there is not the water flow I want.
                        I realize I am responding to an old post, however, for those looking up the 'Beast" the ONLY problem i've encountered is the same as that above mentioned water valve-- poor engineering for such a vital part of the saw. Mine was broken prior to assembly too. I conjurer that the instruction manual could be a bit more user friendly. My main question, what I was hoping to find in the instruction book yet found nothing has to do with the variable speed.. It would be nice to have an understanding what recommended speeds and what they represent on the dial mean-- For now all I know is slow, slower and faster.

                        The blade that comes with the saw should not be used for marble or porcelain as the material (((WILL CHIP))) experience speaks volumes. Be prepared to do allot of cleaning as there are a million and one places for residue to hide with this beast.

                        Its an awesome saw for very large tile, recently had cut 2' x 4' x 1/2 thick porcelain. Love how the stand breaks down and is easily able to be transported.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: New "Commercial" Ridgid Tile Saw "The Beast", Anyone?

                          Originally posted by kramer99 View Post
                          thanks Chemeng,
                          I had a chance to use my saw for the 1st time this weekend and it cut the porcelain tile without any problems at all. I did dial the speed down a bit. I am wondering just what speed I should use with different types of tile. Is there a chart somewhere? The diverter valve broke as someone else mentioned. I'd like to find a brass valve to replace it.
                          Just saw your post Kramer-- had the same problem and have the same question-- did you ever find a chart??

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: New "Commercial" Ridgid Tile Saw "The Beast", Anyone?

                            also states it online.

                            Variable Speed – easily adjust blade speed resulting in superior cut quality on a variety of materials including glass and porcelain

                            Comment

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