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  • Do you use a blade stabilizer?

    I'm just wondering; what are your thoughts on using a blade stabilizer on a saw such as the TS2424? Do you find that you get more accurate cuts and do you recommend them over the stock washer that comes with the saw?

  • #2
    Re: Do you use a blade stabilizer?

    Denis001,

    Welcome to the Ridgid forum!

    Good question! I'd like to know the answer to that myself.

    Years ago, I used to use the standard kerf blades on my old Craftsman RAS and never really noticed any faults with my cut quality, other than my own mistakes.

    Of late, I've been using only thin-kerf blades and for the last year or so, I've got the Ridgid 50-tooth Titanium-coated blades (10") on both my RAS and my Ridgid 10" CMS.

    Last week, I was doing the oak trim in our kitchen and decided that the CMS should be the preferred tool for that. (My RAS is getting a bit old and I really don't like having to change angles all that much with it, because of a worn indexing pin.)

    But, my 10" CMS simply doesn't make great bevel cross cuts. This has been a much discussed "problem" and for the most part it is blamed on the Ridgid saw model. But, I'm not really convinced of that, because the "error" isn't consistant and with the motor off, the measurements are perfect. So, I see no reason why the cuts are NOT, unless of course it's because of blade deflection. So, would a "stabilizer" correct that? I would hope so... but, I also wonder if there's enough space on the CMS arbor to accomodate those?

    I ended up doing all my bevel crosscuts on the RAS, simply because I could not correct the problem on the CMS. With the RAS, I could also control the crosscut better, and it was easier to observe the cut as I drew the blade through the oak.

    Even though it was the same blade (brand and style), my thoughts are that there's more deflection force caused by the downward motion of the CMS, than the cross-cut motion of the RAS. But, of course, that's just my guess.

    I am still using the Chinese-made OEM original (thin-kerf, 36-tooth combination) on my Ryobi BT3100, with great success. I rarely do cross-cuts on the table saw, as it just seems too awkward to me. But my rip cuts are almost "glue-up" quality even after three years and lots of pine boards. (I make it a habit to clean my blades regularly.) I don't see how a stabilizer could improve on that, but certainly it's a possibility.

    Hopefully, another member with far more experience will jump in here and give us both some good advice on the subject.

    CWS

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    • #3
      Re: Do you use a blade stabilizer?

      Nope. They are yet another in a long list of woodworking gadgets that cost good money and are unnecessary. A properly set up table saw with a sharp blade is all you need.

      If you find yourself making a lot of shaving cuts (i.e., shaving half the width of the blade or less) and you notice that the result isn't as square as you like, try a smaller diameter blade and slow the feed rate way down. A small blade is much stiffer than a large one. The smaller blade requires a slower feed rate.

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      • #4
        Re: Do you use a blade stabilizer?

        I bought a set a number of years ago, but never found them to do any thing that I could see, I am sure there is or are times when they may help, but if the blade is bent or heats up and warps, the stabilizer is not going to help much if any,
        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
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        • #5
          Re: Do you use a blade stabilizer?

          I've never had any problems when not using one so I figured that I don't need one.
          Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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          • #6
            Re: Do you use a blade stabilizer?

            I never tried a stabilizer, but my crown moulding miters got a lot tighter when I bought a Forest blade for my saw.

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            • #7
              Re: Do you use a blade stabilizer?

              Great comments. Thanks. This is the kind of feedback that I was looking for. I just picked up a set for short money. I'll try with and without and report my findings. My suspicion is that what Andy said will be the case. Well tuned ts and good quality sharp blade will be the driving factor.

              BTW, dcdude, is your Forrest blade thin kerf, or standard?

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              • #8
                Re: Do you use a blade stabilizer?

                Hi Denis - With a high quality blade and a saw that runs true, you shouldn't need a stabilizer. I've used and tested a lot of blades, full and thin kerf, with and without a stabilizer, and have never noticed an improvement from a stabilizer on a well tuned saw. Based on what I've read from others, the majority seem to have similar experiences, although some do experience an improvement. If you've got a poorly balanced blade, and/or excess vibration somewhere in the saw, then a stabilizer can provide some improvement, but it'll come more by way of a bandaid than cure. Some very tough woods with stiff grain like mequite can cause the blade to follow the grain patterns, and a stabilizer might help with those woods. Unless you've got an existing runout issue, I'd save the money for the stabilizer and spend it on a better blade.

                More on picking blades here.

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