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sliding miter saw swivel table is stiff to move

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  • sliding miter saw swivel table is stiff to move

    I recently encountered a problem with my Ridgid 12" sliding compound miter saw. The swivel table will not move without great effort. It feels as if something is jamming thing up but I have not discovered how to separate the swivel table from the base. I have removed the central bolt and can find no other fastner. As well, I have been unable to find a drawing to work from. Please help!

  • #2
    Re: sliding miter saw swivel table is stiff to move

    here's the parts list:

    http://www.ridgid.com/ASSETS/0F9AF27..._017_r_eng.pdf

    and here's the owners manual:

    http://www.ridgid.com/ASSETS/1BC0D6C...ZA_017_eng.pdf

    HTH
    there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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    • #3
      Re: sliding miter saw swivel table is stiff to move

      Thank you for your assistance. I had in fact located those resources as well. As it turns out, the application of light lubricant seems to have solved the problem.

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      • #4
        Re: sliding miter saw swivel table is stiff to move

        I had the same problem, which was eventually solved...sort of. Initially, the table was bound up to the point that it was extremely difficult to turn, and virtually impossible to taike apart. The table loosened up somewhat after applying oil to the joint where the castings are bolted together. After a couple of applications, it loosened up enough to remove the table from the base. Surprisingly, the male and female surfaces of the rotating joint are chewed up, most likely due to a sloppy job of machining, or perhaps their failure to remove debris before bolting it together. The saw is back together and working, but probably just a matter of time before the problem resurfaces.

        In summary, this looks like a poor design. Rather than relying on machined castings with direct contact, Ridgid should have installed bearings and seals as a means of ensuring a lifetime of trouble-free operation. Another observation is that the "brake" mechanism is pretty cheesy....simply a small diameter rod that creates friction against the base. Unfortunately, the rod chews into the soft metal over time.
        Last edited by TooCoolTools; 01-02-2011, 03:34 PM. Reason: Update the solution and status

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