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  • lifetime warranty?

    Question? I was interesting buying the new x4 combo set when out, but the lifetime warranty seems wrong? The sign at Home Depot says "free parts,service ,batteries for life". Commercial says "free" as long as you can pull the trigger. But your website says" normal wear and tear not covered?" only factory defects? The implied advertising seems misleading. I would hate to have a battery for 5 years and looking for a replacement only to find out that 5 years is beyond normal wear and tear?
    thanks for a response.

  • #2
    Re: lifetime warranty?

    The sign is correct. It is not a warranty, but a service agreement beyond the normal warranty which I believe is three years. Register each product immediately and keep copies of your receipt and UPC code from the box. It will take months to get confirmation on your registration. Ridgid has lost many registrations in the past.

    Welcome to the forum.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: lifetime warranty?

      Really? not a warranty? check this commercial out and you tell me?
      This would be false advertising then and I think anyone would have a good case if this ever went to court.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: lifetime warranty?

        They make it clear in that ad and elsewhere that it is a "lifetime Service Agreement". Most of their boxes say three year warranty and lifetime service agreement (LSA).

        They go to great lengths not to use the term warranty and otherwise call it a LSA. I read in one place where the explicitly disclaim it is not a "warranty".

        I think it is some kind of technical/legal issue where they do indeed have less liability under the LSA than if they called it a " lifetime warranty". However, I also have never totally understood that myself and will not even pretend to know the difference.

        To me, it is just a matter of semantics and, while there may technically be a legal difference, for all practical purposes, they are the same.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: lifetime warranty?

          I wouldn't worry about it... in the end if it does break, the service center will be unwilling to fix it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: lifetime warranty?

            Revisit the link you posted and watch it again. Not once during the whole thing did they ever use the word "warranty".
            Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: lifetime warranty?

              With the LSA it may depend on how good a service center it is.

              My height gear stripped out on my R4511, and it looked like a pain to fix with all the roll pins that hold each part in place.

              I called a service center that was an hour away and lucked out in that they were a large Ridgid service dealer/center.

              I took the saw in and no questions asked they fixed and returned in 3 days. Replaced every part that connected with the height adjustment, greased, cleaned. Nice.

              I was very pleased. Not so much with taking the rails and top off, but I was down a week in all. Lucky with that one.

              Not so lucky with my jointer which I got a year ago and still no LSA in place.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: lifetime warranty?

                There is no lifetime warranty. The tools have a three year warranty.

                You have to personally register the tools within 90 days of purchase for a free Lifetime Service Agreement, which practically speaking is almost like a Lifetime Warranty.

                Most likely the LSA was put in place so it would not be an automatic lifetime warranty for all tools. Helps Ridgid's bottom line and avoids confusion vs putting both 3 year warranty & lifetime warranty on the box.

                Any manufacturer's warranty typically does not cover cosmetics, accidental damage, abuse, replaceable parts (filter), ...

                Wear & tear is a good question.

                The Lifetime Service Agreement would seem to imply to me that normal wear & tear is covered, above strict "factory defects" -- the little clause that any manufacturer can hide behind. What constitutes a "factory defect" for them vs the consumer, when whichever internal component wears out???

                I guess I should read up on the warranty & LSA details

                I have heard & read that parts that wear out under normal use typically will be replaced under LSA, but are at the discretion of the service center and Ridgid's authorization.

                I don't know if my local tech was joking or not, when he said that he could refuse repair on my cordless drill since it had rust on it (I had it with me for a battery exchange). Mind you my tools look mint compared to some I have seen on job sites, for sale online, ... but yes, there was some minimal surface rust on the chuck caused by some scratches, humid weather and sweaty hands operating the chuck.

                I have wondered what would happen for instance when let's say after 10 years or so, tools have been revised a couple times and original parts are no longer available ... for instance if 24v batteries are no longer available or no parts are available for the maxselect series. I was lucky to score two new 24v batteries ... but what will happen 5 years from now? Exchange for a new kit? Because you can't pull the trigger without juice.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: lifetime warranty?

                  Originally posted by icerabbit View Post
                  ......I have wondered what would happen for instance when let's say after 10 years or so, tools have been revised a couple times and original parts are no longer available ... for instance if 24v batteries are no longer available or no parts are available for the maxselect series. I was lucky to score two new 24v batteries ... but what will happen 5 years from now? Exchange for a new kit? Because you can't pull the trigger without juice.
                  that's a good question. in threads on single tools, posters have noted that ridgid has replaced the offending single tool of one voltage with a comparable tool of another voltage, along with batteries and a charger. a combo kit?....that would be an interesting situation.
                  there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: lifetime warranty?

                    Ok, I understand that they do not use the word "Warranty" and that this is a life time Service Agreement. I guess what I am trying to say that Legally "Service" means Just that "Service".
                    Anytime you include Terms like FREE parts, FREE Battery, you are implying a Warranty of the product. That is Contract law "101", you can have a Implied contract with out actually saying the word. I think that is what we have here. Also note in the Commercial they say the Life time service agreement is based on " your Life" Not the life of the tool. Just something to think about.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: lifetime warranty?

                      FREE Parts,FREE Batteries? Implied Warranty. Not Service. "Service" is like technical help, labor, or even Maintenance.
                      Last edited by mike123; 05-24-2011, 03:25 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: lifetime warranty?

                        Well Mike, you seem tough to convince.

                        Basically, a "warranty" comes with the product and in most cases you don't have to do anything, other than prove your purchase date, to have it honored. With Ridgid power tools, the warranty is three years.... and you don't have to do anything to get that, other than keep your receipt to prove that the tool was purchased by you within three years prior to your warranty claim.

                        The "agreement" part of the LLSA is simply that you don't get it, unless you take the necessary steps to properly register the tool. If you don't "agree" to follow the proper procedures to register it, than Ridgid (actually, it's TTI who uses the name under license) has no obligation to you beyond the 3-year warranty. (In other words, if you don't meet the terms of the agreement, then there isn't one!

                        The LLSA covers motors, bearings, switches, batteries, chargers, etc. But, it doesn't cover certain wear items, like those hook & loop subbase pads on sanders, which simply wear out within a year or so. I doubt that it would cover the rubber boot on the Recip Saw and other such items that could be simply worn or damaged during use. Bearings, chucks, motor windings, switches, and similar internal parts can be of such quality that they simply shouldn't be worn out during even extended use. Such components could of course be of cheaper quality in order to keep the mfg. cost down, but as I recall from TTI's original "Ridgid" tool introduction, the idea was to instill confidence in this brand-new line of tools.

                        While there are more than a few complaints of lost registrations and lack of proof on the part of the buyer, I think most registrations go through without a hitch. My understanding is that the "authorized" Ridgid Service Centers are independantly owned and therefore some variation exists in the quality and the response. I think we have all seen an official response on occasion when such problems come to light. I see no real difference in "Ridgid" authorized service than what one might run into with getting their car serviced with a dealer... some dealers are great and some are seriously lacking. Often it's an entire dealorship (or service center), and sometimes it's just an individual. Hopefully such things get straightened out in time, and I have noted in my area of the country, that my authorized Ridgid service center has changed a few times. Bottom line is that if you run into a problem, you do some calling and/or find another service center.

                        For the record, I have only had two service requests with the many Ridgid tools that I have owned (starting in 2003). In both cases the service was good and it was timely. I have had a couple of "concerns" with lengthy registrations... both exceeded five months and/or were incomplete in their listing on my "dashboard". A courtious phone call was met in kind and the records were immediately fixed.

                        I hope this is helpful,

                        CWS
                        Last edited by CWSmith; 05-25-2011, 01:13 AM. Reason: typos

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: lifetime warranty?

                          Most warranties are pointless, and most companies would just as soon you go fix problems yourself, with you going to the company part-purchasing service to obtain (and pay for) the required parts. I have dealt with a few companies that had bulletproof warranties (these were audio companies like Acoustic Research in the old days and Allison Acoustics somewhat later on) but most outfits are betting that you will lose your sales receipts or bar codes, or simply fail to send in the proper documentation after you buy the product. The warranty promotions that most have are not much more than sales techniques and not real warranties that are handled, no questions asked, with little in the way of required documentation.

                          Howard Ferstler

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: lifetime warranty?

                            Interesting opinion, but I find it difficult to understand how you got such an idea. I imagine that most of us have made plenty of purchases and never given the product warranty a second thought, primarily because the product has lasted well beyond the warranty period. Certainly that has been my experience, but I always pay attention to warranty and if there's no warranty or a clear reputation of the company, then there's no purchase. (Let the buyer beware!)

                            A manufacturer who markets a product without standing behind it would make me think twice about any purchase. But for those times when a product requires service, I've never hesitated in either returning the product or seeking service under the provisions of the warranty; and, I've never been refused service or not gained satisfaction under the provisions of a product warranty, no matter who the company was.

                            A "Warranty" is a legal obligation that the company makes to back up its product. No state AG would take lightly any company who's selling a product in that state and not meeting its warranty obligations. Of course some customers prefer beligerance over common courtesy and in such cases, one doesn't get a lot of understanding from the customer service rep on the other end of the line or on the other side of the counter. That often get followed with embarrassment and no follow-up or further attempts to get help.

                            Similarly, I know a lot of people who just declare the product junk and they make no effort to get warranty service. I have a couple of relatives that are like that, they just can't be bothered.

                            I'm sure there are other reasons, but I always looked at it from the point of view that if I liked a product well enough to buy it, then I certainly ought to ensure that it better work or I get my money back. The one thing that I absolutely won't accept is a product that doesn't work "out-of-the-box" and then accept a warranty repair. If I wanted a "repaired" product, then I would expect to pay far less for it as a factory reconditioned item. I've had that kind of a problem only a couple of times and in both cases the company and the dealer wished that they never heard my name, as I will go to whatever lengths necessary to have things made right!

                            Whatever the reasons for your opinion, my experience has been different.

                            CWS
                            Last edited by CWSmith; 05-25-2011, 09:43 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: lifetime warranty?

                              Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
                              Interesting opinion, but I find it difficult to understand how you got such an idea. I imagine that most of us have made plenty of purchases and never given the product warranty a second thought, primarily because the product has lasted well beyond the warranty period. Certainly that has been my experience, but I always pay attention to warranty and if there's no warranty or a clear reputation of the company, then there's no purchase. (Let the buyer beware!)

                              A manufacturer who markets a product without standing behind it would make me think twice about any purchase. But for those times when a product requires service, I've never hesitated in either returning the product or seeking service under the provisions of the warranty; and, I've never been refused service or not gained satisfaction under the provisions of a product warranty, no matter who the company was.

                              A "Warranty" is a legal obligation that the company makes to back up its product. No state AG would take lightly any company who's selling a product in that state and not meeting its warranty obligations. Of course some customers prefer beligerance over common courtesy and in such cases, one doesn't get a lot of understanding from the customer service rep on the other end of the line or on the other side of the counter. That often get followed with embarrassment and no follow-up or further attempts to get help.

                              Similarly, I know a lot of people who just declare the product junk and they make no effort to get warranty service. I have a couple of relatives that are like that, they just can't be bothered.

                              I'm sure there are other reasons, but I always looked at it from the point of view that if I liked a product well enough to buy it, then I certainly ought to ensure that it better work or I get my money back. The one thing that I absolutely won't accept is a product that doesn't work "out-of-the-box" and then accept a warranty repair. If I wanted a "repaired" product, then I would expect to pay far less for it as a factory reconditioned item. I've had that kind of a problem only a couple of times and in both cases the company and the dealer wished that they never heard my name, as I will go to whatever lengths necessary to have things made right!

                              Whatever the reasons for your opinion, my experience has been different.

                              CWS
                              Well, Ridgid makes (well, markets) pretty good tools. I own quite a few of their items, myself, and have been very happy with them. No warranty service has been required at all. All I have to go on is what I have read here and on other product-related sites; and this involves a wider variety of products than woodworking tools. I would imagine that most warranty-service personnel look at customers coming through their doors or phoning in for help with a certain degree of suspicion (suspicion encouraged by the higher-up management), because for all they know a "broken" tool is broken because the owner abused the thing.

                              In my case, if something had happened within the store-return period I would take the item back there and get an exchange or refund, a much easier task than hauling it to a distant repair facility. After that store-return deadline, I would say that all bets are off; the customer is on his own, literally. I will admit that in nearly all cases I modify the tools I buy from whatever store is involved (I have posted some of the modifications on this web site, so it is no secret), and so I pretty much have voided most of my warranties, anyway. (Even if the mod has no impact on the durability of the tool, I can guarantee you that the warranty evaluator will claim that it does.) Life is a gamble, and you take your chances. Thankfully, my stuff soldiers on better than ever.

                              However, getting back to the issue here of warranties, if the Ridgid warranty service is all that great, how come we get so many complaint posts on this site? (If one goes to non-Ridgid chat-group sites it can be seen that other brands often get the same kind of complaints.) The reason is (and this is typical with any larger outfits that sell everything from tools to refrigerators to cameras to air conditioners) that they are hoping the product owner will either (1) just go out and purchase a replacement item; even a competing brand is OK, because the company has already made a profit on the initial sale and they will not have to spend time and money on fixing the customer's problem, or (2 the customer will fix the problem themselves, at their cost (or possibly for no cost at all), and then forget about the issue.

                              This is to say that the companies will certainly be hoping that everything goes fine for the customer, with no warranty problems, but, well, they are in the business to make money, and if the customer ends up being alienated by their warranty experience the company will still have plenty of new customers down the line who are not familiar with the customer's problem, or if they are familiar with it they will be dismissing that customer as a crank, and so will not hesitate to buy the company's products. Generally, few customers who have had issues involving poor warranty support will not bother to notify the authorities about their problems. They will just move on.

                              Customer service at the warranty level is not a priority with most companies because most of the time customer service is not required (the product lasts long enough to satisfy the customer) and because the advertised warranty (whether it is going to be rapidly and smoothly honored or not) is enough to attract more than enough new customers. That is the function of the warranty.

                              Howard Ferstler

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