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TS2424 120 volt change to 240 volt

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  • TS2424 120 volt change to 240 volt

    I am in the process of building a new shop. One of the suggestions I was given suggested that I would get better life and performance if I converted certain tools from 120 to use 240. I notice that the plate on the motor says 120/240 volts 50/60 hz or something to that effect. Is it merely a matter of getting a new power cord and removing the old one? What is the correct amp breaker I would want to use if I did this?

  • #2
    Re: TS2424 120 volt change to 240 volt

    About the only real benefit you'll gain by switching over from 110V to 220V is that your saw will be running on a dedicated service. You might see the saw come up to full speed a little quicker however that won't make the saw perform any better. Other than putting in a new 220 circuit, if you don't already have one, you will have to change out the plug but there is no need to replace the cord unless you need a longer one for some reason. You will also have to move some wiring connections around at the motor end of the power cord. That process is outlined pretty clearly in the Owners Manual.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      Re: TS2424 120 volt change to 240 volt

      Thanks, I will read the manual. The shop is not wired yet, so if I wanted to do such a thing, now would be a pretty good time

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      • #4
        Re: TS2424 120 volt change to 240 volt

        since you have two wires carrying half of the amps, the wear on the switches are less, the voltage drop is less, the lights dim less,and it balances the electrical load (I think there is less heat, and wear on the motor it self),
        my reasoning on this is that if you look at the diagram the lower voltage is split so each winding consumes half of the amps, and on the higher voltage the amps is ran through both winding in series, and the wires in the motor are sized for the lower amps and if all stays balanced it is fine on the lower voltage, but if some thing causes more or less resistance a winding over heats,

        when the motor is started there is a large inrush of power to get the motor up to speed, and with a circuit that is nearly maxed out on normal run conditions, that short but massive amp rush will cause heat and since most wiring is near capacity the voltage will drop, thus upping the amps more, and prolong the starting of the motor,
        (if you ever want to use on portable generator, the best gift you can give the generator is to have it on 240 volts and use both sides of the generator windings to pull the Table saw,

        nearly all info on motors recommend you run them on the higher voltage,

        the reason the TS manufactures do what they do is so they will run on standard house hold currents, as there make for the contractor and home craftsman, using them in the garage or on the job site, and they will function with out special wiring, or wiring configurations, or receptacles, (OSHA and NEC inspectors frown on some temporary wires hanging out of the breaker box with a receptacle on it to run 240 volt tools)

        (NOTE: follow your manual for the change over),

        Single-phase motors

        The motors most commonly found in homes and on farms are called single-phase motors because they operate on the usual 120/240- volt, single-phase current. They are not usually available in sizes larger than 7 1/2 hp although a few larger ones are made. The three types described in this discussion operate only on single-phase AC.

        Larger single-phase motors are often dual-voltage, meaning they are designed to be operated at either of two voltages, For example 120 or 240 volts. The motor has four leads. Connected one way the motor operates at 120 volts; connected the other way it operates at 240 volts. See diag. below.


        below Diag.: By reconnecting the leads, the motor can be used on either 120 or 240 volts.

        If there is a choice, always operate your motor at the higher voltage. At 240 volts it will consume only half as many amperes as at 120 volts. With any given wire size the voltage drop will be only one-fourth as great (measured as a percentage) on the higher voltage than it would be on the lower voltage.
        AC Motors: Types
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        • #5
          Re: TS2424 120 volt change to 240 volt

          So it is possible (read that as safe and code compliant) to run multiple outlets on the same circuit for 220/240 in the same way I would for 120? Or do I need to run one dedicated circuit to each receptacle/outlet?

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          • #6
            Re: TS2424 120 volt change to 240 volt

            I know that most 240 volt are dedicated lines in practice, I do not know if code prohibits multipliable receptacles or not,

            they make and sell duplex 240 volt receptacles, and I would think if it prohibited, by code a receptacles with two outlets on it would be prohibited, I have seen them in both 15 and 20 amp configurations,

            and they make boxes that plug in to generators that have multipliable 240 volt receptacles, and there boxes that are used by vender's that have multipliable outlets on them.

            in a quick search on the web I have seen Yes and NO answers but no code reference to the question,
            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
            attributed to Samuel Johnson
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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            • #7
              Re: TS2424 120 volt change to 240 volt

              I will do the code research. I see that the manual for my rigid jointer/planer has similar reqiring instrcutions, but unfortunately the 13" thickness planer just says it is grounded 120 To bad, thought I was on a roll

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              • #8
                Re: TS2424 120 volt change to 240 volt

                Your jointer has a smaller motor than your saw which draws less amperage so it poses less load to the circuit, plus it's pretty rare to ever bog a jointer (IME) so there's less incentive to bother switching it.....not necessarily so with the TS. Every circuit and situation is different, and the interaction with each motor is different, but as the circuit approaches it's full capacity, 220v tends to have less voltage loss overall, which enables the circuit to better supply full amperage during peak demand. I found that switching to 220v made my 2hp saws start up faster, and recover more quickly from bogging, which makes it easier to make heavy cuts with less strain on the motor....it was more noticeable on one saw than the other. If it's an easy installation for you, I'd suggest doing it.
                Last edited by hewood; 05-30-2011, 08:53 AM.

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                • #9
                  Re: TS2424 120 volt change to 240 volt

                  The jointer/planer is the only other tool in my stable that I can easily convert to 240. Both the TS and JP have simple instructions in the manual for changing the wirnig over. Both suggest a 15 amp 240 plug and since I am in the process of planning out the wiring of the shop if I wanted to convert them at all, now would be the optimal time. It struck me as odd, that the other Rigid tool, the thickness planer, did not have similar instructions (and gettnig at the motor plate to see if it claims to be able to use 240 is presently quite inconvenient

                  My only concern now is whether I can wire multiple 240 outlets on the same circuit. I can envision no scenario where I would ever want to turn on both the TS and the JP at the same time.

                  I am curently in the process of building a cyclone for use with a shop vacuum (and I will use my huge Genie with it, until it dies) The next step is to build the squirrel cage and put my own motor on it and many iof th eplans I have seen for that involve using a 240 v motor.

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                  • #10
                    Re: TS2424 120 volt change to 240 volt

                    Your thickness planer uses a universal motor, which can't be rewired in the same manner as an induction motor.

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                    • #11
                      Re: TS2424 120 volt change to 240 volt

                      I assumed as much.

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                      • #12
                        Re: TS2424 120 volt change to 240 volt

                        here is thread on a electrical board that some one asks about multiple 240 volt outlets on one circuit, (in the question that is asked is about a dryer and welder sharing the same circuit) nec references, 210.23 , 210.19(A)(4) , 213.23 A (2) , 210.21(B)(3) , 210.23(B) , and plenty of discussion about each code references
                        Clothes Dryer Circuit (if you read through it seems to be an area that is not clearly defined,

                        if your going to pull a permit and do your wiring according to the powers that be, I would call the local inspector that would be inspecting the wiring and ask how he would see this done and how he would pass the wiring when done, and how he sees NEC in this area,
                        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                        "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                        attributed to Samuel Johnson
                        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                        PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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