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  • Ridgid Drill vs Ryobi

    I had a few buckets of driveway sealer to mix this morning and decided to use my Ryobi 18volt drill. The mixing was slow, nothing impressive and when the battery died I got out my Ridgid 18volt nicad drill. What a difference! The Ryobi is fine as a backup or spare drill but I highly recommend first time buyers purchase a drill that will not let them down. Frank

  • #2
    Re: Ridgid Drill vs Ryobi

    Not me, for that kind of job I would have reached for my Milwaukee. You know, the one with the tail on it!
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      Re: Ridgid Drill vs Ryobi

      I've used my Ridgid 14.4 drill to stir latex paint, but I don't think I'd attack anything heavier. I have an old 3/8 Craftsman corded that has great torgue... that's the way I'd go, if necessary.

      Reminds me of the guy who posted a really negative review of the Ryobi 3/8 corded drill a few years ago. He bought one, brought it home and commenced to mix tile cement. He said the drill got really hot, then it started to smoke and was so hot he couldn't hold it and it burned up, so he took it back for a refund and then wrote the review. One never quite knows what demands have been put on a tool.

      CWS

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      • #4
        Re: Ridgid Drill vs Ryobi

        I dunno, I have used 1/2" cordless drills for mixing drywall texture and mud, small batches of thinset and grout, but have had terrible luck with using a corded 3/8" drill for doing that kind of work. I think that not loading down the drill too much was the secret to the tools not dying. I also once used a 3/8" drill to prime the oiling system on a fresh 460 I had built. The smoke box broke on the corded 3/8" drill, but my 18V Dewalt ran like a champ.
        We don't have preventative maintenance around here, we have CRISIS MANAGEMENT!

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        • #5
          Re: Ridgid Drill vs Ryobi

          Misuse or abuse of any tool can lead to failure. My point was that the strength of the Ridgid drill far surpassed that of the Ryobi. I was not rough with either drill, but it was clear the Ridgid had no problem stirring the sealer while the Ryobi was in over it's head. I actually got rid of most of my corded tools a couple of years ago. My Milwaukee 1/2" hole shooter would have done a fine job as well.

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          • #6
            Re: Ridgid Drill vs Ryobi

            Frank,

            I understood your point and it was a good post. I think it's important that people know what their tools are capable of and what they are not. I don't think that Ryobi markets their tools to be "top notch" commercial quality, As we know, Milwaukee, Ridgid, and Ryobi (also AEG) tools are all made by TTI, but I think their target markets are different. Problem is that I think many people simply go out and buy a tool, perhaps driven by the lowest price, and espect it to perform any task it is applied to. That was certainly the case of the guy on Epinions who wrote a nasty review of Ryobi drill. My take was that he simply set out to destroy the drill, taking little care as it overheated, smoked, and burned out the windings.

            Your point is well taken and it's good to see the comparison, although I think we would all be surprised if the two brands performed equally. From my own experience, you can just tell the difference just in general handling. I have a good number of both Ridgid and Ryobi tools and I like them both, but as we know, so much of using a tool is simply understanding the limitations (and expectations). I do see a lot of contractors using Ryobi tools though. Perhaps that's simply a price factor, but then again the way some tools are cared for, it's a lot cheaper to replace the lost or dropped Ryobi. It's like using a chisel to scrape up glue... I grab my old 70's era "Companion" set, which I think was about $6 for three. That's pretty much how I choose between Ridgid and Ryobi tools, for serious heavy applications, I buy "Ridgid".

            Thanks,

            CWS

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            • #7
              Re: Ridgid Drill vs Ryobi

              If it wasn't for Ryobi I wouldn't have an 18V miter saw, blower vac, impact wrench, and misc lender-beater powertools

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              • #8
                Re: Ridgid Drill vs Ryobi

                I've had several ryobi tools over the years & still have one or two. I have no complaints. They're not the most powerful or heavy duty, but they're also significantly cheaper than dewalt or even ridgid. If you're a homeowner or someone who doesn't use the tools every day, it's a decent option at the price. I think the biggest problem with ryobi is that people have unrealistic expectations. I know people like this. They buy a tool that costs 1/2 as much but expect the performance to be equal.

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                • #9
                  Re: Ridgid Drill vs Ryobi

                  Originally posted by jerkylips View Post
                  I've had several ryobi tools over the years & still have one or two. I have no complaints. They're not the most powerful or heavy duty, but they're also significantly cheaper than dewalt or even ridgid. If you're a homeowner or someone who doesn't use the tools every day, it's a decent option at the price. I think the biggest problem with ryobi is that people have unrealistic expectations. I know people like this. They buy a tool that costs 1/2 as much but expect the performance to be equal.
                  My main complaint with Ryobi was their nicad bateries, the lithiums make a world of difference. I did not expect the two drill to perfom equally, they are very different. I've been posting here for years requesting more diverse tools in the cordless lineup to no avail. I have some other Ryobi 18+ such as the cutoff tool and soon the 1/2" impact wrench. That new mitre saw looks great, once again Ridgid passed.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Ridgid Drill vs Ryobi

                    I have both Ridgid and Ryobi cordless drills and impact drivers. The nicads batteries that Ryobi offers are not the most robust items of their kind. Some time back, I gave all of mine to my neighbor (along with the charger) and purchased several of their lithium jobs. (The best way to do this is purchase tools and batteries as packages, which effectively sell you the batteries and give you the tools for only a few extra bucks.) World of difference with the lithiums. Those batteries turned the Ryobi units into much better tools. I still use nicads with the Ridgid units, and I will say that the Ridgid nicads are way better than the Ryobi nicads. However, those Ryobi lithiums are something else. The bigger ones (they have two 18-volt sizes) even come with built-in power meters, and Ryobi also offers a separate and more refined charge evaluator (that you temporarily plug into a battery to check it) for only about ten bucks. I find it odd that Ridgid does not offer something like that.

                    Howard Ferstler

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                    • #11
                      Re: Ridgid Drill vs Ryobi

                      Originally posted by Howard Ferstler View Post
                      I have both Ridgid and Ryobi cordless drills and impact drivers. The nicads batteries that Ryobi offers are not the most robust items of their kind. Some time back, I gave all of mine to my neighbor (along with the charger) and purchased several of their lithium jobs. (The best way to do this is purchase tools and batteries as packages, which effectively sell you the batteries and give you the tools for only a few extra bucks.) World of difference with the lithiums. Those batteries turned the Ryobi units into much better tools. I still use nicads with the Ridgid units, and I will say that the Ridgid nicads are way better than the Ryobi nicads. However, those Ryobi lithiums are something else. The bigger ones (they have two 18-volt sizes) even come with built-in power meters, and Ryobi also offers a separate and more refined charge evaluator (that you temporarily plug into a battery to check it) for only about ten bucks. I find it odd that Ridgid does not offer something like that.

                      Howard Ferstler
                      Howard, I have the larger Ryobi lithiums and they are great. I noticed they charge better if completely drained. Very cold weather seems to give them trouble so I keep them inside for the winter.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Ridgid Drill vs Ryobi

                        If RIDGID or someone else were to come out with a dual-battery powered miter
                        saw like I suggested a couple years ago I think they would sell like hot cakes.

                        Two 18V Lithium batteries in parallel would provide plenty of power and make a
                        lackluster tool really useful
                        ---------------
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                        • #13
                          Re: Ridgid Drill vs Ryobi

                          Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
                          If RIDGID or someone else were to come out with a dual-battery powered miter
                          saw like I suggested a couple years ago I think they would sell like hot cakes.

                          Two 18V Lithium batteries in parallel would provide plenty of power and make a
                          lackluster tool really useful
                          Take some spade connectors, dead battery case, and some 10ga wire, make your own connections, make your own parallel connection..
                          We don't have preventative maintenance around here, we have CRISIS MANAGEMENT!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Ridgid Drill vs Ryobi

                            Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
                            Howard, I have the larger Ryobi lithiums and they are great. I noticed they charge better if completely drained. Very cold weather seems to give them trouble so I keep them inside for the winter.
                            I rotate both my Ryobi lithiums (18 volt) and my Ridgid nicads (12 volt). I let two of the three Ridgids that I have sit discharged or near discharged for six months, and then store the one that I have been using and pull out one of the stored units and recharge it. I can get away with just having one "active" battery, because of the 20-minute charge-time feature. With the Roybi lithiums I keep two of the four I have in operational rotation, with the other two in six-month storage. Then, after that time, the two active ones go into storage and the other two come out and are recharged and put to use.

                            So far, this arrangement has worked just fine. I do have to admire how robust those Ridgid nicads are, at least compared to the Ryobi nicads. A buddy of mine works for the city and they have a lot of Milwaukee battery-powered tools, and those have as much problems with nicad breakdown as what I was having with the Ryobi versions. For some reason, the 12-volt Ridgid nicads are very durable, and I have also had no problems whatsoever with the Ryobi lithiums. It is interesting that the only on-board battery check feature I have seen is with Ryobi batteries. (And they also seem to have the only detachable dedicated battery tester, as well.) Interestingly, in spite of Ryobi cordless tools being in the mid/budget price category, the lithium batteries available for them appear to be upscale designs. Well, they are not cheap to buy.

                            Battery storage at proper temperatures is easy for me, since my shop is cooled in the summer (to 82 degrees, even when 100 outdoors, and a bit cooler if I am in there working), and heated in the winter to at least 50 degrees (or warmer if I am in there working), and the building also has a separate dehumidifier for days when it is not hot enough for AC use and not cold enough to use a heater, but still humid enough to warrant dehumidification. Generally, I do most of my big-ticket work out on an adjacent work deck (in the fall, winter, or spring), since most of my bigger tools are on wheels. I can work in the winter, because it is not all that cold much of the time in my area.

                            Howard Ferstler

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