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  • R4330 snipe explained.

    Check me out here. I have a R4330 planer I've used for 2 years and it has snipe. always blamed myself for misalignment or etc.

    Well today I put a dial gauge on table and measured the raise up of the cutter head. I used a stiff board and raised the board into the roller until i could feel spring move. Dial indicator read 0.010 in. 10 thousand of an inch at center. In other words the pressure of the roller spring can move cutter head up 10 thousands of an inch.

    TA-DA!!! SNIPE

    In practise with new blades and thin cut (thin cut means less roller pressure), I get about 4 thousands. Fairly easy to remove.

    OK. Questions:

    Is this within tolerance?
    Do all machines with movable cutter head do this?
    Can I improve on this.


    I have convinced myself today that snipe is part of woodworking. All tools give and take. Some good some bad???

    Would appreciate others knowledge. Actually studied snipe on line 3 times and no one explained it this way. 10 thousand of movement is not a lot but snipe is only a little too.

  • #2
    Re: R4330 snipe explained.

    Originally posted by philzoel View Post
    Check me out here. I have a R4330 planer I've used for 2 years and it has snipe. always blamed myself for misalignment or etc.

    Well today I put a dial gauge on table and measured the raise up of the cutter head. I used a stiff board and raised the board into the roller until i could feel spring move. Dial indicator read 0.010 in. 10 thousand of an inch at center. In other words the pressure of the roller spring can move cutter head up 10 thousands of an inch.

    TA-DA!!! SNIPE

    In practise with new blades and thin cut (thin cut means less roller pressure), I get about 4 thousands. Fairly easy to remove.

    OK. Questions:

    Is this within tolerance?
    Do all machines with movable cutter head do this?
    Can I improve on this.


    I have convinced myself today that snipe is part of woodworking. All tools give and take. Some good some bad???

    Would appreciate others knowledge. Actually studied snipe on line 3 times and no one explained it this way. 10 thousand of movement is not a lot but snipe is only a little too.
    I have the Ryobi AP1300 thickness planer (similar in some ways to the older Ridgid TP1300) and it has a cutter-head lock that prevents any movement (both the earlier and later Ridgid models, for some reason, lack this feature). However, I still get snipe at times, and this probably just involves the way the infeed and outfeed tables are adjusted. However, even if adjusted perfectly (and mine are close to that) you will sometimes just get snipe. It may involve those tables just flexing a bit, even though they seem to be aligned perfectly. With somewhat dull knives the pressure from the cutter head may actually make snipe worse, and heavier or harder-wood boards may also be a factor.

    Solution: use boards that are longer than required and then just lop off the two ends after planing if snipe has happened and it would screw up the looks of a project.

    Howard Ferstler

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    • #3
      Re: R4330 snipe explained.

      I know about cutting off the ends. Even adding pieces on side to take snipe.

      What I would like to know is: is 10 thou. standard? can I beat that? are all machines like that??????

      I thought a Rigid guy could answer. Can I get an answer from Rigid.

      Comment

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