Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Impact Driver

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: Impact Driver

    Have been trying out my new X4 impact driver and I really can't see what is any different than my drill would. I can drive 3 inch screws with my drill as well as I can with this. All I see or hear that is different is when it gets to a point where the screw meets more resistance, the imapct driving force kicks in and you hear a clacking noise. Up to tht point is drives and sounds just like a drill. AM I missing something here? Not sure I should have spent the 80.00
    Ron

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Impact Driver

      Try driving 3" screws into old dry wood, then see how well spent your $80 is. It also works great for removing screws as well. In new wood, an impact is unnecessary, it just makes a bunch of noise.
      We don't have preventative maintenance around here, we have CRISIS MANAGEMENT!

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Impact Driver

        I am going to use it this weekend to put addition blocking under the first floor before I put up batt insulation. At least it is lighter than my ridgid 18 volt!
        Concerning my deck (treated lumber), you would have to pre drill, right? Ron

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Impact Driver

          The impact works awesome for screws your concerned about not stripping the heads. It will continue to drive the screw even when it gets hard to drive, but won't usually strip the head out like a regular drill does.

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Impact Driver

            When you use one, do you pre drill ? Ron

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Impact Driver

              Originally posted by Ronald View Post
              When you use one, do you pre drill ? Ron
              depends on hardness of the material.

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Impact Driver

                There is a time, a place, and a material for predrilling and counter sinking. If it is somewhat of a finish carpentry type job, then yes, pre drilling and countersinking will yield the best results. In most soft woods ( like doug fir, p.t. lumber) then pre drilling is unnescesary for screws, even in old lumber, but mandatory for lag bolts over 3/16" IMO. old lumber where you are applying screws near the end *might* need to get pre drilled if the wood blowing out is a major concern. Most of the time it is not Hardwoods always get pre drilled and counter sunk, as should material like MDF, and 1x pine getting screws near the end.

                When I have to do pre drilling, I like to use a tapered bit with an adjustable stop on it. I feel there is an advantage to using this kind of bit, but I loose them on a regular basis for some unknown reason, so I am stuck with HD crap

                On stuff you are trying to assemble(like cabinets) the first piece of material you want the hole to be slightly larger than the outside diameter (the points) of the thread, and the second piece of lumber to have a hole pre-drilled to the shank diameter of the screw. This will require the hole to be drilled two times, once with the small bit the full legnth of the screw plus 1/4" through both pieces of material , and the second with the larger bit, only as deep as the thickness(width) of the first piece where the head of the screw will sit. You would finish this off with a countersink bit, which will make a cone shaped divot around the hole so the screw head will sit flush instead of proud. Smaller screws and certain types of wood would only need countersinking and a hole drilled thru the first piece of material. Some wood will split if not countersunk/predrilled. This mumbo jumbo I am rattling off mostly applies to hardwood, esp cabinet installation. The more time you spend on prep, the better your work will look. For other stuff, just put the screw in and get it over with.
                We don't have preventative maintenance around here, we have CRISIS MANAGEMENT!

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Impact Driver

                  Thanks gentleman for helping me out on this new tool. Appreciate the info on how to properly use it. Ron

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Impact Driver

                    When you use your drill/driver, you push the the tool as you drive the screw in.
                    Thus you are doing the work and you'll have a tired arm/wrist!
                    Should the screw suddenly stop going in, you will twist your wrist and that hurts!

                    When you do the same with an impact driver the tool does the work you basically
                    hold and guide it. Thus after the work you can hold a beer bottle in that hand without
                    fatigue. If the screw should stop you may break off the head but no damage to your wrist.

                    The impact tools are lighter and smaller and will accommodate tight areas.
                    Most drills are long and heavy etc.

                    I have found I use my impact driver 100% of the time and the
                    drill only for holes!

                    Cactus Man
                    Last edited by cactusman; 10-23-2011, 09:19 PM. Reason: spelling error

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Impact Driver

                      I agree with cactusman, however I never trust work done by a drunk so I refrain from drinking my adult beverage unitl it is time to sit back and critique my work.

                      I forgot to mention the benefit of ease of use of the impact in this thread, but I have been beating down the point that they are great tools to have every other chance I get.
                      We don't have preventative maintenance around here, we have CRISIS MANAGEMENT!

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: Impact Driver

                        Ron
                        FYI: I have used the 12/18v impact driver to drill small shallow pilot holes with some hex shaft drill bits on occasion.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Impact Driver

                          Originally posted by reConx View Post
                          Ron
                          FYI: I have used the 12/18v impact driver to drill small shallow pilot holes with some hex shaft drill bits on occasion.
                          Light duty use, the hex bits in an impact are fine, just not as fast. I even use paddle bits, but it is slow in comparison to the drill.
                          We don't have preventative maintenance around here, we have CRISIS MANAGEMENT!

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X