Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tools needed to Bolt down Safe in Concrete Slab?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: Tools needed to Bolt down Safe in Concrete Slab?

    I am partial to Browning safes myself. I use a roto-hammer and Red Head anchors to set my safes.

    Mark
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Tools needed to Bolt down Safe in Concrete Slab?

      Originally posted by Watersurgeon View Post
      I think you may have misunderstood the anchoring. Safes bolt from the inside not the outside. The floor of the safe will generally have four debits in the four corners that show you where the drill points are.

      5. fill each anchor hole, (one at a time) with epoxy and use the required grade bolt and ratchet the bolt with epoxy in the hole.

      The only draw back to this installation is it is a mother f'ing Be-atch to remove the safe if you ever have to move it.

      I feel silly, now that I think about it, I have never seen exterior flanges on a safe, or have ever attached one to the floor. Still, In response to #5, the epoxy takes time to set, therefore cannot be tightened with anything. You set the all-thread with the washer and nut on the end, then you walk away until the epoxy is cured, then tighten down the nuts.
      We don't have preventative maintenance around here, we have CRISIS MANAGEMENT!

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Tools needed to Bolt down Safe in Concrete Slab?

        Originally posted by masterbeavis View Post
        I feel silly, now that I think about it, I have never seen exterior flanges on a safe, or have ever attached one to the floor. Still, In response to #5, the epoxy takes time to set, therefore cannot be tightened with anything. You set the all-thread with the washer and nut on the end, then you walk away until the epoxy is cured, then tighten down the nuts.
        Once I set the safe in place, everything is aligned I fill the holes with epoxy, stick the bolt in it and thread it down tight. The epoxy will set in about an hour, be hard cured in a week. Although I have never tried this you could feasibly use a hardened threaded rod. Cut them to the right length, epoxy them in the holes with the rod sticking up in the safe, and then in a week or so go back and install the nuts.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Tools needed to Bolt down Safe in Concrete Slab?

          I bolted my gun safe down a few weeks ago. It weighed about 800 pounds empty. The floor under the carpet was concrete. I used Tapcon screw anchors from Home Depot. I used my 18 Volt Ridgid hammer drill and the masonry bit that Tapcon recommends for the 1/4 inch anchor bolt/screw. Started out with the slow drill speed at first - took about 15 minutes per hole to drill about 2 inches. Later I switched to the high speed and drilled each hole in about 5 minutes. The holes in the bottom of the safe are way over in the corners and it was tough getting to them to drill the holes. I did not move my safe after I started the holes then move it back to bolt them down - this safe is tough to move and scoot on carpet and I felt I would never get it back and properly aligned. I used a large fender washer under each Tapcon screw/bolt head. I sucked the dust out of the holes frequently as I drilled with my Ridgid shop vac.

          I know I am going to get criticized - the Tapcon 1/4 inch bolts may not be as tough as anchors epoxyed in or other methods mentioned above. But my thinking was this:

          I have had burglaries at homes I have lived in before. According to police the typical burglar is paranoid and scared to death that they will be caught or get shot by someone - so they usually are quick in (kick in a door or break a window latch) and quick out (grab what they can and scat) and don't want to make a lot of noise or create a disturbance that will attract the attention of your neighbors. They usually strike during the daytime when most folks are at work. They are usually young and seeking items they can pawn or sell quick - usually to buy drugs, etc. Stuff I had stolen were jewelry, small tools, guns, a guitar, and small electronics. The best prevention for them (according to police) is a burglar alarm. I installed one at a house I lived at before (after 2 burgularies) and the burgular alarm stopped them when they came back a 3rd time.

          Professional burgulars are more relaxed and according to police - there isn't much way one can stop them from success. Fortunately they are not very common. So my aim was to protect against the amateurs and make sure my homeowner's insurance had a guaranteed replacement clause and my limits of liability were high enough to cover my stuff.

          The Tapcon screws/bolts probably would only slow a professional burglar down a little bit less than what a more substaintal anchor installation would - my aim was to discourage the amateurs only. I am sure the massive weight (probably over 900 pounds with the guns in there) would be sufficient but the bolting to the floor was one extra level of security. And they sure are a lot quicker and less tiring to install and they don't leave a big hole in the carpet if I decide to move my safe. Heck the weight of the safe alone required 3 young men to help me get it in the house - I have a professional appliance dolly and it was useless in moving the safe. We had to scoot in on the floor with these heavy duty furniture glides - there are no hand holds on these big safes. I was all we could do to get it unloaded from my pull behind trailer - the folks at Tractor Supply used a fork lift to load it.

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Tools needed to Bolt down Safe in Concrete Slab?

            A friend of mine is a retired Deputy Sheriff. He was telling me a story about a case he worked back in the 80s where these tweakers had come and more or less robbed this house blind. The house was waaay out in the middle of nowhwere, if you were on this road, either you had buisness with the homeowner, or were up to no good. The owner of the home was elderly and was in a care home or something of that nature. The thieves tried stealing the save but could not get it loaded into their truck. You could see where they drug the safe along the floor ruining the hardwood, and had it under a tree with a broken branch to show for their efforts. He staked the house out for a few nights, seen a truck pull up that had a severely dented tailgate, somebody get out of the truck, the truck drove off. He went up the road a ways, and flagged down the truck when it came back, he jumped right in when he stopped, pulled his gun, and arrested the man. Took the truck back to the house, and arrested the other guy who had a stronger chain hoist rigged up to a bigger branch of the tree....

            Another friend who is a General Contractor was telling me about some idiot employee who was an ex con for robbing a house. He was telling me the story he was told how the cop busted him when they returned to steal the safe. It took me a minute to realize that his employee was the same guy who my friend busted.
            We don't have preventative maintenance around here, we have CRISIS MANAGEMENT!

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Tools needed to Bolt down Safe in Concrete Slab?

              The safe my son built for me is around 1,000 pounds, the safe my son-in-law built for me is around 1,300 pounds. Still I was able to unload them with help, then use an equipment dolly to roll them in to place. I would guess they are both a couple of hundred pounds heavier now so it would be tough but not impossible.

              Mark
              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

              Comment


              • #22
                I don

                Comment


                • #23
                  My good friend and neighbor is in the Safe and Lock business. Sells, installs, and services everything thing from a lockset to Vault Doors. He's also my go to guy when I have an extra heavy boiler or storage tank to get up to the second floor. He uses Epoxy for all his products.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
                    Re: Tools needed to Bolt down Safe in Concrete Slab?

                    All good suggestions. You can probably rent a hammer drill from home depot and talk to the Hilt rep for advice on the proper size bit and style anchor. This is not a difficlut job at all but have you worked with power tools? If you decide to do the job, remove small portions of rug where you will be drilling so you don't spin the rug around the drill bit. Don't "clean out" the hole once you reach the correct depth.
                    I commend you for anchoring something of this size and weight, not only to prevent or slow down theft, but to prevent a safety hazard in the event of someone leaning or pushing on it. People probably get badly hurt everyday from free standing wardrobes, tool chests and other things that should be better anchored or secured. Frank

                    Frank I agree with everything you said except I don't understand your comment about not cleaning out the hole after drilling. We always remove any concrete/debris after drilling and AFAIK Hilti and any other anchor manufacturer will reccommend that you do this. Hilti even makes hollow drill bits that connect to a vacuum to remove the dust as you drill. They work great and are nice when drilling into walls or ceilings, but useful on floors too. But for this job you don't need one, easy enough to use a standard shop vac.

                    Drop-in anchors are fine but in this case I would use a bolt such a 1/2" diameter Hilti Kwik-bolt 3 or equal. Why, becaue you can place the safe and drill and set the anchors without having to move it again. No hassle lining up the 400# safe with pre-drilled holes or messing starting bolts in the anchors. Follow directions for minimum hole depth for the length of your anchor. As someone else said don't drill all the way through your floor slab, that will just create a path for moisture to enter. When calculating anchor length don't forget to allow for the thickness of the bottom of the safe and anything else between the slab abd ttthe safe such as leveling shims/washers, etc. If you do need some type of leveling shim, make sure it will not compress over time which would result in loosening the anchors. Torque anchor to the specified value in the manufacturers instructions. Over or under torquing can lead to anchor failure. If your safe is up against a wall you might consider a couple anchors near the top of the safe into the wall too.
                    "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X