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Ridgid 12" Sliding Compound miter saw problems.

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  • Ridgid 12" Sliding Compound miter saw problems.

    I own 2 Ridgid Sliding Compound miter saws and both have a problem with the motor braking system. They run great but the motor does not brake when the switch is released. Is there a simple fix for this problem that I can take care of myself or is this a more involved fix. Thanks.

  • #2
    Re: Ridgid 12" Sliding Compound miter saw problems.

    Originally posted by Joe514 View Post
    I own 2 Ridgid Sliding Compound miter saws and both have a problem with the motor braking system. They run great but the motor does not brake when the switch is released. Is there a simple fix for this problem that I can take care of myself or is this a more involved fix. Thanks.
    Every ridgid miter saw I have owned have had the brake stop working, and they all use the same motor. As far as I know you can only fix it by replacing the entire motor.

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    • #3
      Re: Ridgid 12" Sliding Compound miter saw problems.

      It could be a bad switch.
      SSG, U.S. Army
      Retired
      K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

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      • #4
        Re: Ridgid 12" Sliding Compound miter saw problems.

        Originally posted by TOD View Post
        It could be a bad switch.
        The switch is not part of the motor assembly, and when I had mine fixed they replaced just the motor.

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        • #5
          Re: Ridgid 12" Sliding Compound miter saw problems.

          This is how the brake works. The switch has One Normally Open and one Normally Closed set of contacts. The NC circuit is used as the breaking mechanism. While your miter saw motor is spinning but without any power applied it is acting as an electric generating device. By shorting the output of this generating device (Which is why the need for the NC part of the switch.) you're creating a significant load on the generator. This is the breaking system on many devices with universal motors. The NC part of the switch almost always fails first due to very high peak but short duration current and voltage.

          Worn brushes can also cause the problem. There is nothing mechanical in the motor that acts as a brake. It is all done electricly.
          Last edited by TOD; 04-23-2012, 07:25 AM.
          SSG, U.S. Army
          Retired
          K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

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