Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Positive drill chuck lock

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Positive drill chuck lock

    I've owned a Craftsman cordless right-angle drill for years, but every time I've used it I've thought of throwing it into the trash can. The reason is that the drill keeps getting loose, and I have to stop to re-tighten the chuck. I've finally decided to get a drill that has fixed that particular problem, but the first place I checked, Ryobi, told me that they have nothing special for that problem. Now, it could be that their chucks never loosen, or it could be that if I bought one I would encounter the same problem i've had with my Craftsman. I'm not willing to take that gamble. So, my question is, Do Rigid drills have some kind of positive-chuck-locks? Also, I'm wondering if drill technology has advanced to the point where MOST drills now have this feature.

  • #2
    Re: Positive drill chuck lock

    Why not just replace the chuck on the Craftsman drill with a chuck that requires a chuck key to tighten down the bit? As Ryobi makes many different tools in the Craftsman line for Sears the chuck on the Ryobi drill could be identical to the one found on the Craftsman.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Positive drill chuck lock

      Originally posted by BadgerDave View Post
      Why not just replace the chuck on the Craftsman drill with a chuck that requires a chuck key to tighten down the bit? As Ryobi makes many different tools in the Craftsman line for Sears the chuck on the Ryobi drill could be identical to the one found on the Craftsman.
      ---
      My reason for not doing that is that I didn't know that the chuck that comes with a machine could be replaced. I didn't even know that they could be taken off. Now that I know, I'll look into it. By the way, I also asked if the problem that bothers me is common. If it's not, it could be that I just happened to have purchased a lemon. I'm interested. Should I be able to assume that any drill I purchase today will have a chuck that stays tightened if the tightening is done by hand?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Positive drill chuck lock

        many people do not know how to tighten a key less chuck,

        I have ruined a cordless drill key chuck on my first drill, and had to replace,

        run the chuck up to closed, and then grab and tighten again until it clicks a few times, if you do that I do not think you will have any problems, but if you do not do that you may mess up the chuck to the point where where it will not hold.

        A: Norm Abram replies: Keyless chucks are convenient, but they do seem to slip more than keyed chucks. I've also noticed that they're getting better, so manufacturers seem to be addressing this problem.

        To tighten a keyless chuck, you need to get a good grip on it. Larger chucks with aggressively knurled collars improve your grip, while smaller chucks with relatively smooth collars make tightening more difficult. Others incorporate a ratcheting mechanism that clicks when you've tightened it enough.

        Don't forget the bit side of the problem. Although a chuck with serrated jaws will grip better than one with smooth jaws, it isn't easy for any chuck to hold tight to a smooth, cylindrical surface. Using bits with hexagonal shafts solves that problem, but if buying all new bits doesn't appeal to you, consider replacing the chuck, either with a better keyless model or one that requires a key. Making the switch isn't difficult, and it's a lot less expensive than buying a new drill. You can find replacement chucks at most home centers, or order them through woodworking catalogs or the Internet.
        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
        attributed to Samuel Johnson
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Positive drill chuck lock

          Originally posted by BHD View Post
          many people do not know how to tighten a key less chuck,

          I have ruined a cordless drill key chuck on my first drill, and had to replace,

          run the chuck up to closed, and then grab and tighten again until it clicks a few times, if you do that I do not think you will have any problems, but if you do not do that you may mess up the chuck to the point where where it will not hold.
          ----
          Okay, thanks for that. My Craftsman doesn't click and never did; however I've seen ads that discuss this problem and mention one proprietary system or another to fix it. Often times, such ads mention the "Click of Reassurance,"although they don't use those words. I also just returned from a trip to Home Depot on a Click-checking expedition. Most, if not all, of the drills I checked, clicked when you tightened them as much as possible. So, I guess if it "clicks" it sticks.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Positive drill chuck lock

            I've never had a chuck loosen up on me, so your post got me to wondering.

            While my old sixty's drills (all three of them, a Craftsman, a Sears Companion, and a Milwaukee) all have keyed chucks.

            My newer drills are all of the new "hand-tighten" variety. The one Ryobi I have is the corded "Clutch Driver" and it's chuck is a two-piece design, you have to hold the back piece "collar" to ensure the front piece is properly tightened. My two Ridgid cordless drills both have the "click".

            CWS

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Positive drill chuck lock


              After tightening, usually a quick jerk when twisting will lock the chuck.

              Ron


              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Positive drill chuck lock

                Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
                I've never had a chuck loosen up on me, so your post got me to wondering.

                While my old sixty's drills (all three of them, a Craftsman, a Sears Companion, and a Milwaukee) all have keyed chucks.

                My newer drills are all of the new "hand-tighten" variety. The one Ryobi I have is the corded "Clutch Driver" and it's chuck is a two-piece design, you have to hold the back piece "collar" to ensure the front piece is properly tightened. My two Ridgid cordless drills both have the "click".

                CWS
                ---Okay, here's my last word on the subject--I promise. You have put your finger on the problem. My Craftsman has the same arrangement: You have to hold the inner/back piece collar still in order to be able to properly tighten the front piece. The problem is, you can't. True, if I should equip myself with an appropriate wrench (tongue-in-grove, pipe wrench, etc), I would be able to hold the inner collar still while tightening the front piece, but I usually don't have anything like that with me when I use my drill. Therefore, I am unable to tighten the front piece as much as I would like. Here's where other drills I have used were superior. In other drills I have used, you could lock the inner collar in place by adjusting the rotation direction of the drill. In other words, if you changed the direction of the drill to counter-clockwise, that would lock the inner collar drill in place, and you could then tighten the front piece to your heart's content. At least that's the way I remember it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Positive drill chuck lock

                  the home depot guy showed me that the Ridgid and dewalt drills with metal chucks require one click backwards to lock after tightening

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X