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  • Ridgid 7" Wet Tile Saw

    I need a wet tile saw to clip 200 marble tiles. I was looking at the Ridgid 7" wet tile saw with laser guide and stand for $469. Will this saw serve me well? Are there other Ridgid saws or other brands I should consider? I will keep the saw and use it here or there in the future but mainly I want it for this job. So, I want to get a good quality saw that is easy and safe to use and does a good job but I don't do this for a living for I don't want the $2000 models. Any thoughts and/or experience is appreciated!

  • #2
    Re: Ridgid 7" Wet Tile Saw

    I've owned a number of tile saws over the years, and I'm currently down to just two, a 10" with pump, and a pumpless 4". We've installed thousands of tiles - ceramic, glass, porcelain, marble, granite, satillo, and pavers.

    In my experience, the blade is more important than the saw. An old blade or a cheap blade will produce chip-out. I like the power of the 10" saw for cutting granite, but I like the convenience of the 4" for everything else. The 7" saws were the perfect compromise between those other two, but I no longer have a 7".

    Based on the needs you've posted, I really don't see that you need to spend a lot of money on a saw. Any saw that will give you a solid and STRAIGHT fence, and will allow you to bevel should serve your needs pretty well.

    I would strongly suggest that you buy a good tile breaker, along with your wet saw. A tile breaker keeps you from having to use up your expensive diamond blade making all those straight cuts, and most of your cuts are probably going to be straight. The breaker is also much faster than the saw and it can be used right in the room you're tiling.

    And here's a fairly obvious tip for wet saws (I've been a victim). Maintain a loop in your power cord to ensure that water from the tray doesn't run down the power cord to the electrical outlet.

    Good luck,
    Dan

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    • #3
      Re: Ridgid 7" Wet Tile Saw

      Dan-Thank you so much for the advice. I am not familiar with a "tile breaker" for marble tiles--can you give me a name or a link to one? I agree about the blade, and would be very interested in what you use. I will also be doing some pavers in the future so will get use out of the saw then as well.

      What I will have to do initially is clip one corner of every tile (there is a black tile that goes in the middle of every 4 tiles). Thus this cut needs to be nicely done, straight, and easily reproducible. Would a "tile breaker" do this better than a wet saw? I was thinking get a wet saw, set it up to cut where I need, and then you can cut every tile in a reliable manner. I am a rookie to this so any help you can offer is greatly appreciated. I enjoy being DIYer and with the money I'm saving, I feel justified in buying whatever saws and tools I need to do the job safely, correctly, and easily. Thanks!

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      • #4
        Re: Ridgid 7" Wet Tile Saw

        You definitely are going to want the wet saw to dock corners
        As for a tile "score and snap" style breaker, dont waste your money if your just doing stone. The breakers will work for some stine but not usually, its more for ceramic and porcelain tile. As for pavers, check the clearance... it might be tight cutting a pavee with that saw height wise. If it does clear, I highly recommend a segmented blade for the pavers. The tile blade would work but very slow and I found pretty tough on the saw. I have the Ridgid WTS2000 from a while back. Good saw, but its been used and starting to show it. Looking to upgrade, but not sure if I'll go 10" or 7" this round.

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        • #5
          Re: Ridgid 7" Wet Tile Saw

          Ditto to everything Alphacowboy said. If you're doing natural stone, a breaker is useless and can in fact do more damage than good. Marble is essentially sandstone, and is often too soft for getting clean breaks. You'll just have to do a little test. For doing "dots", you will want to use the tile saw for sure. I've found that making a simple jig is worth the effort if you're cutting lots of corners. I like any of the high-end diamond blades, but if I had to pick one brand that performs particularly well with granite, it would be DeWalt. A blade that works well with granite works well with any machined tile. I use a hand-held saw with a segmented blade for pavers. I like the segmented blade for the reasons mentioned by Alphacowboy, but additionally, I like the portability of the hand-held for pavers.

          I've made a lot of tiling mistakes over the past 50 years, but the one that cost me the most money was not knowing that green marble is different from all other marble colors. It can't be installed with thinset, even thinset for marble. If you EVER install green marble, read up on the physical characteristics before you begin the job!

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          • #6
            Re: Ridgid 7" Wet Tile Saw

            The green marble has oils in it does it not? I haven't had the "pleasures " of installing it yet...

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            • #7
              Re: Ridgid 7" Wet Tile Saw

              The green marble oil, coupled with the way it reacts to water causes it to warp almost as badly as wood. You can't use water-based thinsets or bedding mortars with it. So that means epoxy, and I've gotten to the point where I'd rather clean the toilets at a truck stop than work with epoxy mastic.

              The first time I installed green marble was in a 50' x 30' retail store. I had a crew and we worked all night, using thinset for marble. We got a call about 2 days later saying that every single piece had warped. I don't mind being stupid. I just hate having to PAY to be stupid!

              -Dan

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              • #8
                Re: Ridgid 7" Wet Tile Saw

                Just a thought... if it's really just one big job you need it for, have you considered renting one? You could have the $2000 saw for your job, which will probably make it easier for you. From what you're describing, this job is gonna need a more powerful saw than what you'd want to just have around for future use on ceramic tiles and stuff.

                And if you wanted one in the future for lighter use, you could get one much cheaper. This is the one I used to build my whole shower, and it worked like a charm, but certainly wouldn't handle the job you're taking on. I know you don't have this brand where you are, but there's certainly similar stuff out there in terms of price and quality.

                Mastercraft 7-in. Slide Tile Saw | Canadian Tire

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