Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse

How To Post Images

Want to know the how to upload images to your posts? Image Posting Tutorial
See more
See less

Will the Ridgid Tri-Stack Compressor Suit My Needs?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Will the Ridgid Tri-Stack Compressor Suit My Needs?

    Hi Y'all!!

    Long time no see. Not sure anyone still here remembers me, but I used to be around these parts a while back when I was building a shower. FWIW, that job's still not done... but that's a different story.

    Anyhow... I've wanted a compressor for a long time now, mostly for working on my car. I've got the Ridgid corded impact wrench, and have yet to find a bolt it won't knock loose, but it's quite bulky.

    So I want one that will run impact wrenches with lots of power. I expect that's probably the most powerful tool I'd want to use and that if a compressor can do that, it'll have no issues with things like brad nailers and other tools for household projects.

    But here's what's confusing me... I was looking at the air-powered Jobmax tool and reading the box, and it seemed to imply that I need a compressor capable of 18 SCFM @ 90psi for some of it's tasks.

    I then went and looked at the various compressors for sale and came to the conclusion that this is either an insane amount of SCFM, or I'm completely misunderstanding the numbers.

    The Tri-Stack one, which seems like a great option, only says it's good for 4.9.

    Can someone set me straight?

  • #2
    Re: Will the Ridgid Tri-Stack Compressor Suit My Needs?

    Only big boy compressors will run the air powered Jobmax!
    Typical pneumatic tools like ratchet, grinders, drills use from 4 to 9 cfm at 90psi
    Nailers typically run 3cfm or less at 90psi.

    I have no clue why Ridgid designed their pneumatic Jobmax to require 18cfm!

    for 18cfm at 90psi you'll need to look at 60-80gallon 175psi dual piston 240v compressors
    They can deliver 18cfm and more at 90psi. None of the 120vac types and portable compressors
    will get you 18cfm..in fact many can't even get you to 9cfm at 90psi

    Cactus Man

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Will the Ridgid Tri-Stack Compressor Suit My Needs?

      Thanks Cactus Man!

      So I WAS reading that correctly and it is a rather ridiculous amount of air needed for a little multi-tool. It's cool that it weighs half what the corded one does, but other than that, what's the point? It costs the same, and almost nobody could use it with a portable compressor. Who is the market for this thing?

      Anyhow... I did a bit more searching and it looks like even 500 ft-lb impact wrenches only need around 4 SCFM or so. So the power level seems good to me. I expect it will be used mostly for running an impact wrench or finishing nailer or maybe for just blowing dust off stuff or filling tires.

      Does anyone here have one of these? Is it as versatile as they make it out to be? Do you ever use the components separately or should I just get something simpler?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Will the Ridgid Tri-Stack Compressor Suit My Needs?

        it's a very cleaver design and if i already didn't have 10+ compressors, i would probably own 2.

        i posted something about the jobmax scfm a while back and mentioned the same thing you discovered. the amount of air is crazy. but right up there with a die grinder.

        an impact is used in short burst and therefore isn't rated for a large amount of scfm. same with most nailers. but if you run it full blast like for sheating and shearwall it will consume the air much faster than a small compressor will produce it.

        the concept is cleaver and is easily duplicated with a secondary air tank to use as a surge tank. leave the heavy compressor outside near the power outlet and run the hose to an external tank. then just plug into this tank with a 25-50' hose. keeps the air supply more study and less strain on the motor as the unit is plugged into a close outlet and air hose is used for the jumper.

        truthfully if your electric impact is working for you, don't waste your time with an air powered unit. unless you do tires for a living, you'll never see the benefit for air.

        remember that the compressor uses 2- 4x the power of your impact wrench.

        rick.
        phoebe it is

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Will the Ridgid Tri-Stack Compressor Suit My Needs?

          Well... I do suspension work on my own and friends and family's cars in my driveway now and then... that's really the issue. For just tires, half the time I don't even bother getting the electric one out. That's why the size can be a bit of an issue. It's not a matter of the thing being heavy. It's a matter of manoeuvring it in tight spaces. Sometimes it just doesn't fit where I need it.

          I've also got a bunch of trim in the house that needs replacing, so I figure a compressor is the way to go for that. And hell... I've got a bit of a Tim Taylor complex. I like to have the right tools for the job.

          Incidentally... I notice that compressor hose is pretty inexpensive. Is it unreasonable to think that I'd just leave the thing in the garage and run a hundred feet of hose into the house and up the stairs to use a finishing nailer to put trim upstairs? Or is there some downside to that idea? With this one, I guess I'd have the tank upstairs and leave the motor part in the garage right?

          Also... when I'm finished with cutting wood or something, I tend to put the hose out the outlet of my shop vac to blow everything clean. A compressor would be better for that as well I think.

          So yeah... I'm trying to convince myself that I've got enough uses for a compressor to be worth spending the coin and taking up the space in the garage... and wondering whether this particular one would be a good idea. Ridgid tools have been good to me in the past... so why not stick with them, right?

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Will the Ridgid Tri-Stack Compressor Suit My Needs?

            it's design is cleaver and the fact that the primary air tank can be disconnected is the advantage.

            the downsize is it's a low capacity compressor. great for portability, but not really intended to be a shop compressor. usually a 12-20 gallon is more shop size.

            the compressor will work with long air hose when using low volume tools. or in the case of this compressor, just bring the tank upstairs and leave the compressor in the garage. that's the idea behind it. also for just a handful of shots. the tank can be used on it's own with no jumper hose .

            rick.
            phoebe it is

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Will the Ridgid Tri-Stack Compressor Suit My Needs?

              I bought cordless impact tools instead of air-powered ones. I thought about it a lot and finally realized it is a lot easier to carry a few batteries to wherever work needs to be done, than string out an air hose. If working outside of the home, easier to bring batteries than an air source.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Will the Ridgid Tri-Stack Compressor Suit My Needs?

                I agree with what Jeffsw6 and Plumber Rick have told you.

                I have a 60gallon porter cable 240vac compressor in my work shop.
                I have a reel with 100 feet of 3/8" air hose [from Harbor Freight] mild weather in Arizona
                so it has held up!

                Most of my air tools are Harbor Freight/Chicago Pneumatic. My nailers are Ridgid and Liker [23g pinner]

                I am a weekend warrior and do not use any tools 8 hours a day 5 days a week so they are not the expensive
                high quality types you see in professional environments. I maintain all the tools and today some are over
                9 plus years old! and work as when they were new!!

                If you are serious about an air compressor here are some more things to consider:

                Is portability really critical? going from the work shop to the driveway does not count!
                Do you have access to 240vac?

                I had a Sears Craftsman 20gallon portable for many years and when I started to use air tools
                I was always waiting for the compressor to catch up with my work!
                I finally upgraded to a real unit [the one mentioned above] and I'm very happy with it.

                If I could have a do-over, I'd likely get even a larger unit as mine does limit at 9.7cfm at 90 psi!
                When grinding ...die grinder...sanding or any air tool running a while you'll eat up the air very
                quickly and will have to wait for the compressor to catch up.

                I also have a portable compressor. I rarely use it. It's a Porter Cable twin tank and actually provides
                9cfm at 90psi but not for very long!

                Another topic you have not discussed are types of portable compressors....
                You have oil free and oiled!
                They both have advantages and disadvantages.
                The oil free is less expensive, runs very loud, typically does not come close to 9cfm, needs 120vac 15amps
                wears out and does not last as long as an oiled type compressor.

                The oil type is more expensive, runs quieter, typically has less cfm at 90psi as non oiled types, needs 120vac 15 amps
                lasts longer.

                If your main need are for nailers then you have a myriad of compressors and brands to select.
                For "serious" air tool use such as grinding, buffing etc your selection for a portable unit become very limited.

                As Jefffsw6 mentioned, battery powered tools may be a good choice....Sadly Ridgid may not meet your needs.
                Look at the Milwaukee line of 18v battery powered impact tools etc.

                Check out Home Depot, Lowe's, Norther Tool, Harbor Freight for sales and compressor selections.


                Cactus Man

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Will the Ridgid Tri-Stack Compressor Suit My Needs?

                  I actually don't own any cordless tools except a pair of cordless screwdrivers whose batteries seem to be not long for this world. I know the technology is a whole lot better than it used to be, but I generally find that I'm never all that far from a plug and that my corded tools always work. For an impact wrench, I just don't see a cordless being of much use for when you really need one to get stuck bolts loose and what not. I have friends with cheap corded ones that sometimes can't even get an over-tightened lug nut off. My giant Ridgid one never has that issue.

                  So it sounds to me like this thing will probably do the trick for what I want it for. Time to add it to my xmas list. Does anyone actually have one though? Any quality issues or anything else I should be concerned with?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Will the Ridgid Tri-Stack Compressor Suit My Needs?

                    Looks like Cactus Man was posting at the same time as I was...

                    Hmm... so this is an oil-free one... which means it won't last as long and will make more noise, right? Not sure that's what I want...

                    I don't have access to 240V in my garage. If I got a permanent one then I suppose I could have a 240V outlet wired in, but I know I won't be doing that. It will all get way too expensive for the amount of use I'll get out of it. I just can't justify it.

                    For things like grinding, I really don't mind electric tools. Any time the need arises, I've got either my angle grinder or a dremel to use and they've both served me well over the years. That JobMax thing is about the only high-volume tool I'd want, and I've already written it off. If I decide to get one, I'll get the corded one. I have an old version of a similar tool that's been useful over the years. That's really the only reason I was looking at that thing in the first place.

                    I'll definitely go check out Home Depot and the other big box stores to see what's available in the way of an oiled compressor to see what might suit my needs.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Will the Ridgid Tri-Stack Compressor Suit My Needs?

                      Originally posted by cactusman View Post
                      As Jefffsw6 mentioned, battery powered tools may be a good choice....Sadly Ridgid may not meet your needs.
                      Look at the Milwaukee line of 18v battery powered impact tools etc.
                      I got the Dewalt "20V max" tools and am going to retire my older 18V ones. Makita was my second choice, but Dewalt had better "black Friday" sales and I waited for that day to buy any major tools this year. I didn't consider Milwaukee as much as the other two.

                      Originally posted by Wild Weasel View Post
                      I actually don't own any cordless tools except a pair of cordless screwdrivers whose batteries seem to be not long for this world. I know the technology is a whole lot better than it used to be
                      You are missing out.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Will the Ridgid Tri-Stack Compressor Suit My Needs?

                        Originally posted by Wild Weasel View Post
                        I don't have access to 240V in my garage. If I got a permanent one then I suppose I could have a 240V outlet wired in, but I know I won't be doing that. It will all get way too expensive for the amount of use I'll get out of it. I just can't justify it.
                        If you are not willing to put in a 240V receptacle then you can't have a big enough compressor to run serious air tools with much duty-cycle. That's all there is to it.

                        If you have a generator with a 240V socket you could use that to run your compressor for very occasional use.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Will the Ridgid Tri-Stack Compressor Suit My Needs?

                          Oh... sure... crush my dreams.

                          I'm really getting the impression though that what I've got in my head and what reality would turn out to be might be two very different things. Ah well... maybe some day in the future I'll set aside room in the garage for a 60 gallon tank and 240V compressor and just forget about it all until then.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Will the Ridgid Tri-Stack Compressor Suit My Needs?

                            there is some things one can do to make a small compressor work better in a shop situation,

                            one add a larger tank, take an air bubble and put a tee on it and a quick connect, male on one side and female on the other side, if you have a 5 gallon compressor and put it through a 12 gallon air bubble you have now a 17 gallon air tank, if you have a quick connect that does not go through a regulator one can just go into the tank and not use the tee, as the air will go back wards, in the hose back in to the compressor,

                            what this does it gives more of a reserve, of air, (not necessary more air but a larger reserve),

                            the Job max, this is my guess, it is designed to be used continuously, an air wrench usually only runs for seconds at a time, and thus a small compressor can keep up with it, take it and run it for minuets at a time, and see how good your little compressor keeps up, it most likely will not,
                            there is a chart on this page, of the air usage of many air tools, and at the bottom it is figured at 25% usage, Air Tools and Air Consumption

                            not the best Idea on running your hose 100 plus feet unless there is no other way, the air hose has friction and you will have full pressure when static, but as soon as you start to draw air thorough the hose and fittings you have drops in pressure, if you have to do this by putting the air bubble tank near the end of the hose line and a check valve in it going back to the compressor, you will have a better pressure and the tools will respond better, but only as long as you do not start to take more air than what is in the reservoir tank

                            for example if you run 200 feet of air hose and try to run an impact wrench you will discover that the wrench will not have the power that when used with 25 foot of hose,

                            also look at the hose, the larger the inside diameter of the hose is important, and also quick fittings are reduced more than other styles (for example in our area most use the long stem Lincoln type) but it has a lot more restriction than many other styles),

                            the bigger the hose and the bigger the flow through the quick connectors the better, and even going with a larger regulator than the one built in the compressor may be of help, (most I have seen are very small capacity),
                            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                            "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                            attributed to Samuel Johnson
                            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                            PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Will the Ridgid Tri-Stack Compressor Suit My Needs?

                              The problem with just adding bigger air tanks to small compressors is it means the motor runs longer and produces more heat. This is a good way to test the warranty on most inexpensive compressors.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X