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WD1956 "Shockingly Shiny"

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  • WD1956 "Shockingly Shiny"

    Hey everyone, I had this post up on the Electricians Forum for a few days hoping for some ideas from the electrical experts of the world. Lots of views, no comments??? So, I've decided to re-post it here in front of all of you power tool experts. Anyone out there have the same problem I do? Anyone come up with a solution?

    I am the proud owner of the bright and shiny WD1956 vacuum. This is the RIDGID model with the stainless tank. Great medium duty machine for the shop and construction site. Just one complaint...this machine packs a mean punch. After vacuuming for awhile (specially with the rigid extensions), it releases and nasty arc if you happen to get close enough to the tank to the point where it actually hurts.

    Anyone have any suggestions how to rig a ground strap or lead to it to prevent the static buildup?

    Thanks
    "Good enough" isn't really "good"...

  • #2
    Re: WD1956 "Shockingly Shiny"

    Antistatic Hose - Festool Cleantex Dust Extractors

    Anti Static Shop vac hose. Get your pocket book out. Good luck
    "don't put that in your mouth, you don't know where it's been"

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: WD1956 "Shockingly Shiny"

      Thanks Jay. Went and had a look at our local Festool reps website. $170.00 for a 1 7/16" x 11 1/2' hose - yikes!

      C'mon RIDGID, how about an anti-static hose for all your loyal customers? Should be able to make that happen for about $50.00, yes?

      So, I'm thinking a length of multi-strand copper wire fastened along the length of the hose from end to end with quick connect break-away terminals at the extractor. I wonder...
      "Good enough" isn't really "good"...

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: WD1956 "Shockingly Shiny"

        Connect a braided copper ribbon to the canister that is long enough to touch the floor, it should dissipate any charge the vacuum creates.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: WD1956 "Shockingly Shiny"

          Thanks Cowboy - just like the ground strap you hang from the chasis of the car. Sounds like a simple economical solution for sure. I'll PU the parts and pieces today from the local electrical wholesaler and see how it goes.

          Merry Christmas!
          "Good enough" isn't really "good"...

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: WD1956 "Shockingly Shiny"

            Are you sure the vacuum itself isn't defective? Does this happen to other people with the same model? The reason I ask is because I had got the big one with the removable blower thing years ago and it was garbage. There were visible arcs of electricity jumping around in the motor while it ran and then it would just shut down for a while. I exchanged it for another one, that had different issues. Then I gave up and returned it and bought the WD1450 and have been happy with it ever since.
            Last edited by Wild Weasel; 12-19-2012, 01:20 PM.

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            • #7
              Re: WD1956 "Shockingly Shiny"

              Originally posted by Wild Weasel View Post
              Are you sure the vacuum itself isn't defective? Does this happen to other people with the same model? The reason I ask is because I had got the big one with the removable blower thing years ago and it was garbage. There were visible arcs of electricity jumping around in the motor while it ran and then it would just shut down for a while. I exchanged it for another one, that had different issues. Then I gave up and returned it and bought the WD1450 and have been happy with it ever since.
              I don't think this is a defect. I have experienced this problem with many other industrial vacuums, (most with plastic canisters and just a mild "tick" of a shock). I believe the problem I'm experiencing with my 1956 is amplified by the metal canister. I have a 4070 and it builds up a static charge once in awhile but no where near the intensity of my 1956. I would be very interested to hear from other WD1956 owners as well - anybody?

              I didn't get a chance to make it the the wholesaler today to PU the ground strap for the idea that Cowboy suggested earlier. I will follow up with an update once I complete the retrofit.
              "Good enough" isn't really "good"...

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: WD1956 "Shockingly Shiny"

                Tis the world of double insulated tools and using two wire cords.

                The ground wire is left out and static can't be dissipated.

                I experienced the same challenge with some orbital sanders and static electricity.
                As the electric charge built up the electronics would self destruct.

                I agree a ground strap as simple as some window chain may reduce the static charges.

                The reason we don't see the strap on cars anymore is the tires we have are now more conductive.

                What are you vacuuming anyway?

                Cactus Man

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: WD1956 "Shockingly Shiny"

                  Tis the season; the dry, wintery lot's of static season that is!

                  A year or so ago, there was another series of posts regarding static build-up and shock. IIRC, it regarded both the vacuums and orbital sanders, or perhaps the combination. I think similar answers and suggestions were given.

                  I don't think that a length of copper braid or conductive chain is going to be sufficient to "bleed-off" and thus prevent any static build-up... unless you are on an unfinished ground, or grounded floor. Basically, you have to have something that will "complete the circuit"... and give static electricity some very conductive way to go.

                  Static can be built up easily, basically requiring some kind of "friction" or "shear" of dust, moisture, wind, etc. across or through a surface that can generate electrical charge, which we refer to as "static". It happens as wind and rain, combined with wind shears across wires, or damp (and therefore, conductive) surfaces. It was part of the "Moby Dick" story, and was well known to seaman, especially of the long-ago "sailing ships" and their massive rigging. The phenomenon was known as "St. Elmo's Fire".

                  It is a problem with aircraft, and other objects subjected to these kinds of conditions and I have it with my Ham Radio antenna, during bad weather; and thus need to keep the antenna "grounded" to prevent any lightning-attractive static build-up.

                  The solution, I would think, for your vac system is to have "conductivity" between the hose and the tank, and that the tank itself, need to be grounded back through the electrical cord and through the plug and receptacle. Seeing that this is or can be a problem (though I'm not so sure you could call it "common"), I'm sort of surprised that Ridgid hasn't addressed it, especially on a more expensive vac, like you have.

                  CWS

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: WD1956 "Shockingly Shiny"

                    I have, on a couple of occasions, replaced a non-grounded power cord with a grounded one. The last project was a brass table lamp that "shocked" my wife every winter. Prior to that, there was an old double-insulated drill for my dad. I took advantage of that opportunity and went ahead and made the cord a little longer at the same time. I realize that replacing the cord would be a pain in the butt for some hand-held power tools, but I would think that it would be a piece of cake for a vac.

                    Dan

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                    • #11
                      Re: WD1956 "Shockingly Shiny"

                      Originally posted by cactusman View Post
                      ...What are you vacuuming anyway?

                      Cactus Man
                      Just regular construction debris - concrete and drywall chips and dust, sawdust, etc.
                      "Good enough" isn't really "good"...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: WD1956 "Shockingly Shiny"

                        Originally posted by CWSmith View Post

                        ...The solution, I would think, for your vac system is to have "conductivity" between the hose and the tank, and that the tank itself, need to be grounded back through the electrical cord and through the plug and receptacle. Seeing that this is or can be a problem (though I'm not so sure you could call it "common"), I'm sort of surprised that Ridgid hasn't addressed it, especially on a more expensive vac, like you have.

                        CWS
                        A longer cord with a ground pin wouldn't hurt. I'm surprised as well - especially since this is a wet vac. One would think that a ground would be required by UL & CSA - no?
                        "Good enough" isn't really "good"...

                        Comment

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