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Bench Planer Question

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  • Bench Planer Question

    I have a Ridgid R4331 planer, just got it. Ran a peace of wood through and it seems OK. Except, after completion of the planing phase the end of the wood (trailing tip) is still under the planer head. I have to manually raise the head to to pull it out. I'd thought that when the wood goes through it comes out completely. At least that's always been my experience using other brands/models. It appears as though it's a "poor feed" situation, not sure. Is there something I'm missing here or doing wrong? Is it a roller problem or setup issue? Thanks in advance for some input.

  • #2
    Re: Bench Planer Question

    I'm not quite sure I understand what you mean when you say it "comes out completely" but I do know you shouldn't have to manually raise the cutter head to remove the work piece. Once the planer has done its work you should be able to just slide the workpiece out without any resistance.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      Re: Bench Planer Question

      The piece of wood moves completly on to the discharge table. That's what I meant by "comes out completely". Again, I'm unable to slide the workpiece off the discharge plate as it's still (partially) under the cutting head. If I shouldn't have to manually raise the cutting head then what could be the problem? Any ideas? Thanks for responding

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      • #4
        Re: Bench Planer Question

        Sounds like the out feed side feed roller is not being powered. That would be a problem.

        GCG
        I was always afraid of dying. Always. It was my fear that made me learn everything I could about my airplane and my emergency equipment, and kept me flying respectful of my machine and always alert in the cockpit.
        Chuck Yeager

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        • #5
          Re: Bench Planer Question

          OK, how can I check or verify that? Does the out feed function along with the in feed? How do the rollers function? If a board is fed into the planer would both in feed and out feed rollers operate simaltaneously? If that's so, then the board would come out on to the discharge tray. Right? Perhaps then the out feed roller may not be in question, just saying. OR does the out feed roller only operate at the final discharge of the piece of wood? Just trying to acquire enough info to figure this out without having to ship it back or bring to an authorized repair center. Hopefully, it's something simple that can be taken care of myself.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Bench Planer Question

            Originally posted by jimshoe52 View Post
            OK, how can I check or verify that? Does the out feed function along with the in feed?.
            easy, raise the cutter all the way and look at the outfeed roller and see if it's turning while it's on. DO NOT DO ANYTHING OTHER THAN LOOK AND WEAR SAFETY GLASSES. AFTERWARD TURN IT OFF IMMEDIATELY.

            Originally posted by jimshoe52 View Post
            How do the rollers function?.
            They press the work piece to the bed and turn together to feed the piece through the planner as the cutter does its thing

            Originally posted by jimshoe52 View Post
            If a board is fed into the planer would both in feed and out feed rollers operate simaltaneously?.
            Yup.

            Originally posted by jimshoe52 View Post
            If that's so, then the board would come out on to the discharge tray. Right? Perhaps then the out feed roller may not be in question, just saying..
            As stated. look and see ... both should be turning when the unit is on. SAME WARNING APPLIES.

            Originally posted by jimshoe52 View Post
            OR does the out feed roller only operate at the final discharge of the piece of wood? .
            It would have to turn during the cut or the piece would tend to jam.

            Originally posted by jimshoe52 View Post
            Just trying to acquire enough info to figure this out without having to ship it back or bring to an authorized repair center. Hopefully, it's something simple that can be taken care of myself.
            Can't help you there without looking at it myself.
            I was always afraid of dying. Always. It was my fear that made me learn everything I could about my airplane and my emergency equipment, and kept me flying respectful of my machine and always alert in the cockpit.
            Chuck Yeager

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Bench Planer Question

              OK, I'll check those rollers and respond accordingly. Thanks again for the help.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Bench Planer Question

                Well, I checked both in/out feed rollers and they were working. Then it had occurred to me that perhaps I should check the in/out feed tables. So I cleaned and applied silicon and checked them for plumb. To my surprise, the out feed table was not plumb. It appeared to be tilted up. So, I readjusted both in/out feed tables, ran some wood through and nothing stuck. I was very surprised and happy that a minor adjustment would fix the problem. So, thanks to everyone for the suggestions and input, much appreciated.

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                • #9
                  Re: Bench Planer Question

                  Congrats on the easy fix, but the silicone on the tables may cause a some grief later during finishing. Not sure just how to remove silicone (I've read Formula 409 is worth a try) as I avoid it like the plague but once removed try a good FURNITURE grade paste wax. Johnson's is a favorite of mine.



                  Auto grades have silicone so you'd just be swapping one silicone problem for another.

                  GCG
                  I was always afraid of dying. Always. It was my fear that made me learn everything I could about my airplane and my emergency equipment, and kept me flying respectful of my machine and always alert in the cockpit.
                  Chuck Yeager

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Bench Planer Question

                    OK, I'll do that but what's the problem with the silicon?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Bench Planer Question

                      It interferes with finish adhering to the wood. In the case of lacquer it causes fisheye. The contamination is invisible so you don't realize you have an issue usually till it's too late. Keep the stuff away from your wood and your tools.

                      Please tell me you haven't already contaminated other tools.

                      GCG
                      I was always afraid of dying. Always. It was my fear that made me learn everything I could about my airplane and my emergency equipment, and kept me flying respectful of my machine and always alert in the cockpit.
                      Chuck Yeager

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Bench Planer Question

                        Excerpt from a web based article:

                        "Silicones: Never use silicone-based wood cleaning products on your precious wood finishes!
                        Silicones impregnate the wood fibers and can prevent the wood from accepting a new finish. It keeps wood from breathing... so over time the finish will develops cracks.

                        It is almost impossible to refinish wood that has been treated with silicone! Attempting to apply a new finish to an apparently clean surface filled with silicone wax will create a surface with pinpoint spots or craters and fisheyes where the silicone residue has rejected the new finish. You must remove all silicones before doing any type of restorative work!

                        To remove silicones from a wood surface, use a cloth dampened with turpentine and sprinkled with powdered laundry detergent. Rub the surface of the wood in the direction of the grain to wash the finish. Change cloths frequently to prevent the dirt and silicones from being redeposited on the finish."


                        GCG
                        I was always afraid of dying. Always. It was my fear that made me learn everything I could about my airplane and my emergency equipment, and kept me flying respectful of my machine and always alert in the cockpit.
                        Chuck Yeager

                        Comment

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