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  • Wet dead batteries

    About 8 months ago I bought a 500$ cordless combo pack. I felt like a kid at Christmas. I couldn't get to the job and drill or cut something fast enough. I've had milwaukee, makita, bosch, craftsman, ryobi, snap-on, and I can't remember all the other manufacturer's of cordless tools of every kind but never Ridgid. I'm thinking at the next kitchen or bathroom remodel I'm gonna show these bad boys off. The second pipe I cut had a little water sitting in it and that water leaked down the saw blade onto the saw and my hands. This is an abandoned 1/2" supply line with absolutely no pressure in it. NOT A LOT OF WATER, a few tablespoons, maybe....and the brand new 18v li battery is totally dead and will not take a charge no way no how forgetaboutit it's dead. It didn't take too much longer before the other one got wet, It died instantly, too! ARE YOU KIDDING ME? You are the same guys that make my pipe threaders and pipe vices and table saw,aren't you?!? What is the matter with you? passing crap like these batteries onto me? I can't afford 240$ to replace them so now I'm out Well Over 500$ for a bag of cordless/powerless tools. My son loaned me one of his little batteries so I'd have "something" to work with but you'll never guess what happened to it today. WHAT ARE YOU THINKING? It wouldn't take much to waterproof these batteries or maybe add a reset button to the circuitry. SOMETHING BESIDES NOTHING. I am sooo disappointed with Ridgid. I had total faith I was purchassing the ridgid quality I've worked with for 37 years. I was lied to. I feel ripped off. Can anyone tell me how to modify the circuit board to these batteries to enable them to charge up so I can use my tools? I can't possibly be the only one who's experienced this. There's gotta be a solution.

  • #2
    Re: Wet dead batteries

    Since Obvious Man is unlikely to provide an answer, I'll give it a shot.
    How about not getting them wet?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Wet dead batteries

      Properly registered into the LLSA Program your batteries would/will be replaced free of charge.

      BTW, "You are the same guys that make my pipe threaders and pipe vices and table saw,aren't you?!?", table saw no, the others yes. Pretty much all of the "RIDGID" branded power tools you see sold at Home Depot are not manufactured and sold by Ridge Tool but by TTI/OWT. TTI/OWT pays Ridge Tool a fee to put the RIDGID name on the tools they make and sell.
      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Wet dead batteries

        The first 3 years the tools are covered without registering them. So I would go that route. As mentioned, the tool has the ridgid name on it, but thats all just a name. Not really the same as your real ridgid plumbing tools.

        I own enough propress tools to stock a dozen trucks. They're not intended to be used on wet lines, but who are we kidding, its a tool for crimping copper lines from 1/2"-4". And in service work, its almost impossible to have dry lines. That's why propress is ideal for service. In the 13 years I've owned propress, I can't think of 1 time that I ruined a tool or battery getting the tool wet.

        I too would be upset after buying a tool that's designed to work on piping and it couldn't be exposed to a little water. Especially when the batteries are well over $100.00 and the tool is well over $1000.00 alone.

        Now I doubt that they will know the battery got wet as I doubt they actuall disassemble them, but I can't see you ruining a batery everytime you cut a wet line. Can you cut from a different angle to let gravity work for you? Can you wrap a rag around the line to prevent water spraying? Can you drill a hole first to relieve the water?

        Do you know how the water is getting into the battery? Can you seal off that area of the tool when wet cutting?

        Try the included 3 year warranty and see how that goes. If you registered for the lifetime service, you'll be good even longer. Of courses if they disassemble the battery and see water damage, I doubt they will cover it. Because in all honesty, the tool is not designed to be used for wet use, even though plumbers always work with wet pipes. Good luck and let us know how it goes
        .
        Rick.
        phoebe it is

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Wet dead batteries

          I have to agree with Rick, this situation occurring more than once needs to be looked at and you need to figure out a different approach in order to save your tools. Regardless of brand, water will damage electronics.

          I've cut wet lines with my tools before and I've been lucky enough to not have problems. I'm trying to imagine though how two tables spoons of water poured onto the blade works it way down over the blade clamping assembly, down the tool body with it's many vents etc and into the battery. Were you doing direct overhead cutting? As Rick mentioned could you change angles perhaps in case of water leakage so the battery isn't directly under the line?

          I hope you get them fixed, and welcome to the forum

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Wet dead batteries

            Originally posted by Big Jim View Post
            Since Obvious Man is unlikely to provide an answer, I'll give it a shot.
            How about not getting them wet?
            That's funny. I appreciate your since of humor. But, seriously now, did you not read my question or is it my poor command of the english language that's throwing you off? And, if that's the case, I apologize. In either case I'd like to thank you for your time and consideration. Thankyou

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Wet dead batteries

              Thank you. And yes there are dozens of things I could possibly do to protect the batteries from moisture. In all honesty, I'm 57 yrs old and I don"t want to have to pull an umbrella out if I think there's a chance it will rain on my tools. I expect them to work as hard as I do. rain or shine. And I expect their manufacturer to be at least as responsible as I am.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Wet dead batteries

                #1: I said "a few" ei.4tbls=1/4c(...if I remember correctly) #2; you're missing my point. but thankyou for the good advise.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Wet dead batteries

                  I'm not sure what you want from this forum. If it's venting you should expect some comments that may or may not be supportive.

                  The part I don't understand is why you would repeat a process that had already cost you one battery. This falls into the "fool me once, shame on you...fool me twice, shame on me" category.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Wet dead batteries

                    Originally posted by rofl View Post
                    I'm not sure what you want from this forum. If it's venting you should expect some comments that may or may not be supportive.

                    The part I don't understand is why you would repeat a process that had already cost you one battery. This falls into the "fool me once, shame on you...fool me twice, shame on me" category.
                    Agreed, and also the comment about tools working as hard "rain or shine" seems like an unrealistic expectation on the tools. They do sell waterproof power tools but they are pretty expensive.

                    bon-7777 I feel for you, it sucks loosing two batteries. They are expensive and from your post, it would appear that you purchased an X4 kit given the $500 price you paid. What also sucks a lot more is the fact that kit has the large batteries. Normally I would recommend picking up a few drill kits when they go on sale and parting out the bare tools but even if you do this you will only get the small batteries.

                    Given the price of a stand alone large battery, I would consider getting the X4 kit again when it comes on sale or has the jobmax bundled in it. Keep the jobmax and batteries and sell the rest. I did this with a set I purchased last year for $400 when it was on sale and after keeping the batteries I broke even.

                    Another option would be to part out the tools you already have since you don't have the batteries. You might recoup 2/3's of your money. Then you can decide to rebuy ridgid or another brand if you feel dewalt or makita would hold up better to getting wet.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Wet dead batteries

                      It may come true in the future that cordless power tools will be waterproof but the current crop are not.

                      But with brushless motors now appearing it may be possible to have waterproof tools at a reasonable price,
                      or should I say affordable price for the average user.

                      For underwater work I used hydraulic or pneumatic driven tools. Depending on where you are the hydraulic tools can
                      be a problem if they develop a leak. Then you might have a reportable 'spill' on your hands and have to deal with the
                      cleanup costs and making reports to USCG, EPA, and others. We have a pneumatic Hilti drill on one job for wet work
                      which was not cheap, but neither are the electric Hilti drills as we all know.

                      Toughest tool to find for underwater work has been torque wrenches. They're available just not from too many sources.
                      Seem to be used mainly on oil platforms and by commercial divers.
                      ---------------
                      Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                      ---------------
                      “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                      ---------
                      "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                      ---------
                      sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Wet dead batteries

                        I have 2 brand new batteries that are dead, one isnt even 2 months old. They to got a little wet. was working outside, started to rain lightly and the two batteries we had out that got damp are dead... I get your not suppose to get electronics wet... but this kind of irks me, they should have a protective coating on the electronics in these. Its a cheap deal, heck I bet that new rustoleum water proof crap HD is pushing would do the trick with one coat.... Temped to take all my batteries apart and coat them to protect them from something this stupid. I don't get to irritated at Ridgid as my tools have been reliable, but this sorta thing kind of ticks me off...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Wet dead batteries

                          I do believe you understand my frustration. Rustoleum might just work. thank you

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