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Dust Collector Grounding.....

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  • Dust Collector Grounding.....

    Few questions on the subject. I have read somewhere (can't remember where), that is not a good idea to use PVC for your system. Now this weekend I watched WOODWORKS and David Marks showed his system to consist of 4" PVC connecting to a "grounded metal pipe". Is this a safe way to do it? How should one ground the system if not. I took the advice of one of the members here (sorry i do not remember your user ID) and have a small squirrel cage from an old furnace. It is a smaller one but it moves a lot of air. Planning to use this and a network of hoses to blow the dust out the back of my garage. Grounding it properly is a serious concern for obvious reasons. Any advice/direction to look is greatly appreciated
    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

  • #2
    I'm not expert on DC systems but here are some things that I do know. Point grounding a plastic pipe has no effect because plastic does not conduct electricity. Plastic can however build a static charge with dust flowing through it as you likely have found while using a shopvac and can transmit that charge from any point on the pipe. We use 3M toner vacuums at work which have grounded hoses (toner dust is combustable - another story). The hoses have plastic ends and plastic hose but there is a steel coil that wraps through the entire length and the vacuum has a grounding pin where the hose attaches. As the static charge builds it is removed by arching through the grounded vacuum instead of the higher resistance human hanging onto the hose. I would suggest that you could accomplish the same thing by wrapping the plastic pipe with metal tinsel and grounding the tinsel. We also use the tinsel method to remove static from the paper that is fed into the large continuous form printers.

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    • #3
      Everything you always wanted to know about home workshop dust collection systems, but were afraid to ask.

      web page

      Or in Ed's case, I never met a question I was afraid to ask! [img]tongue.gif[/img] (which is good for all of us). [img]smile.gif[/img]
      Lorax
      "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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