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Cordless to corded AC adaptor?

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  • Cordless to corded AC adaptor?

    I recently had a carpenter on a job who had his cordless Dewalt circular saw plugged in directly to an AC adaptor. I have nine 18V Rigid powertools and sometimes I need to use them continuously all day and need full power without waiting for a battery to charge. Does Rigid have something like this available?

  • #2
    I've never seen an adapter like that from Ridgid but it sounds like it could come in handy from time to time. On the other hand, why not just have a corded circular saw for those times when the cordless won't do the job? Corded tools never run out of power.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      i believe the dewalt was a 24 volt unit. the adapter he was using cost as much as an electric tool of good quality. dewalt no longer makes the 24 volt units.
      i don't believe ridgid has that adapter out yet. also for continual use, why not purchase an elctric tool. cordless are great for a quick job and portability. if you were going to drag a charger and power supply around, why not just an extension cord and proper tool?

      rick.

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      • #4
        You are right, when the AC adaptors first came out it was meant for the guy who needed to make that "just one more cut" at the end of the job and did not want to wait for the battery to charge. I have heard that if you try to run the tool for long periods of time, that the adaptor will over heat. Also note the the tool will only have the power of DC tool and not the expected power of a corded AC tool. These draw backs could be the reason that we don't see many of them around. I like what you all said, you are better and most likely cheaper off buying a good corded tool to back up the cordless.
        Unless you are the lead Dog, the scenery does not change...

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        • #5
          I must agrea with Dawg, how much I love my cordless I won't be with my corded tools I been around a bit and when in one place at a time cord is the way for me!
          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
          Be safe out there folks
          Bob B
          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

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          • #6
            Years ago I used to convert cordless stuff to corded when the batteries went dead. I used to just measure the amperage of a new battery and then go to Radio Shack and get the appropriate step-down transformer. Don't know what sizes they have now days. You might have to search the web. Then just tear apart an old battery, drill a hole for the incoming line, put a grommet in to make it neat, and rewire it to the battery contacts inside the battery. Not sure what whould happen if you didn't disconnect the existing internal contacts from the battery. Probably fry the tool since you'd be bringing in volts/amps X 2. You could get fancy and put a switch on the battery to route the current, but if the battery is already dead you could just disconnect it and throw the internal part away.

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            • #7
              One more thing. I got one Ridgid Tool with a battery since they just came out with the Lifetime Warrenty. Personally I think Cordless is just a scam. I burned out an old Sears 9.6 years ago. Went to buy a battery and it cost as much as the original drill. For $30 bucks more I just bought another with more voltage and 2 batteries. Anything else I'm staying corded.

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              • #8
                I been looking around the web for a step down transformer for that old 9.6 Volt drill. Didn't find anything that would fit the bill, but I did find this calculator.

                http://www.angelfire.com/pa/baconbacon/page2.html

                So I figure I'll go dig around in whatever drawer I've got the old charging stand in and take it and the transformer apart. I'm not sure if the diode and Amp blocking resistor are in the transformer or the charge stand. I'm not at home now but I think those transformers are glued together. That might present a problem if they're inside it. I still got a lot of those old electronic parts from a National Radio Institute course I took 30 years ago. If it's like those old Electronic Muscle Stimulators I used to boost it should be just a matter of changing the resistor.

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                • #9
                  I dug the old 9.6 Sears charger out. Transformer is in the housing, not at the 120V plug. Took it apart and ran some test with my MultiMeter. DC Output is 12V DC. It has a feedback loop that measures the battery V and serves as a switch for the charger. I kultzed it when probing and fed the transformer input(120V AC) back into itself. Tripped the breaker, burnt the charger's 500MA fuse and vaporized the tip of MultiMeter. I'm thinking 1200V to do that. MultiMeter was rated at 1500V. So I'll have to wait till I go by Radio Shack and get some more fuses. Charger has a board stuffed in a slot with some resistors, diodes, and a capacitor. Just looking in I'm figuring most of it is used for measuring the charge and turning on/off the Red/Green LED. Took a battery apart. 8 cells, one jammed up the neck of the battery with the contacts glued to it. You'd have to drill a hole in the bottom of the battery and snake a cord up to the contacts and solder them and cut all the battery connections. Then run the cord to another battery and do the same thing. Then go into the charger and disconnect the feedback loop/switch and change out whatever resistor to bring the Amps backup to the 1.8 Amp Rating of the Drill. So in the end you'd have a battery in the drill with a cord to another battery that would be plugged into the charger. I put the project on my 'To Do Later' table along with the other 4 projects that are already there. It's something that can be done, but it's probably not worth the effort since I have a 14.4V drill with 2 batteries.

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                  • #10
                    You have the right idea but you are way off on the power requirements. The charger is only rated to put out enough current to charge the battery in 1 hour, it is far short of the current required by the drill when in use. Even a small 9.6 drill with a meager 200W motor will require in excess of 20A under screw driving loads.

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                    • #11
                      You sure about that? Normal household is 15 Amps AC. I'm thinking that since my Sears Car Battery Charger has a trickle charge of 2 Amps I'll just figure out the poles on the battery and then use a couple of metal shims to jam down the sides. Although it's outputting 12 Volts the most it can do is fry the drill. But according to the Instruction Book the drill has a built in overload circuit. I haven't torn one of these cordless gears apart but I always figured their power came from the internal gearing. If it runs slow I'll just change the Car Charger to 5 and then to 10 and see what happens. If I don't have the power then I guess you're correct so I guess maybe I'll just wire the drill straight to the transformer and bypass all the internals.

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                      • #12
                        household current is 15A on most circuits but it is at 120V which gives an available wattage of 1800W. you must remember that as the voltage decreases the current must increase to maintain the same wattage P=I*V. I tested my theory on my 14.4 V dewalt and with my 20A meter inline it easily reaches the 20A limit of my meter by provide hand resistance to the chuck

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                        • #13
                          You're right. I hooked the 9.6 Drill to my Car Battery Charger at 2 and 10 Amps. Same speed but it was much harder to stop the chuck by grabbing it at 10 Amps. I got a rubber donut on the chuck for tool less bit changes. The 12V charger didn't seem to bother it either. Didn't get hot or shut off. The cheapest 20Amp charger I see online is about $50 bucks. I didn't try the 60 Amp setting. I figured that much might fry the drill. Maybe I will though since I don't use the thing anyway.

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