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  • Jointer advice

    I want to add a jointer to my shop but I've never owned a jointer so I am basically unaware of what to look for. I'm looking for something that will help do table tops, furniture sides, etc with almost invisible joints. I also want to use it for a thickness planer. Right now, I'm comparing the JP0610 to a Grizzly G1182Z. Any comments on these? Should I add some models to my list of considerations? This is not a production shop...just a hobby.

  • #2
    I replaced my old Rockwell jointer with a JP0610 at Christmas time, and I love it. The only other one that was in the same price range that stacked up was the Delta 37-195. The JP0610 that I bought was mistakenly tagged at $199 and the Depot honored that price (and gave me 10% off for trading in an old jigsaw!), so that made my decision a bit easier. The only thing I can say in comparing the Delta and the Ridgid is that the Delta did seem to have more power and ran a bit quieter.

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    • #3
      I have the Ridgid and it works great. Either will probally work fine. Not sure about as a thickness planer. It will work as a planer but not to parallel sides like a thickness planer.
      Steve

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      • #4
        SCWood, Can you tell me more? I thought a jointer would deliver parallel edges and sides on boards up to 6" wide. It was my assumption that the only difference between a planer and a jointer is that the jointer requires two manual passes to do what the planer does in one autofeed pass. If my understanding is wrong, maybe I should be looking at thickness planers instead of jointers. Please ducate me.

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        • #5
          With a parallel planer the feed deck is parallel to the cutting blades, which gives you parellel sides. With a planer/jointer if you plane one side correctly it will be smooth. When you turn it over it will be smooth but not necessarily parallel.
          Steve

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          • #6
            I'm starting to get it...duh! Which tool, if either, is best for taking minor cups out of boards?

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            • #7
              I'm starting to get it...duh! Which tool, if either, is best for taking minor cups out of boards?

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              • #8
                to take cups out of boards you need a jointer. If you feed a cupped or bowed board through a planer you get a thinner cupped or bowed board due to the pressure of the feed rolls on the planer. To figure out the size of the jointer you need two know 2 things. The max width of a board you want to flatten and the max length of the board you want to straighten. Max width is the width of the jointer. The max lenght that you can successfully straighten is at most twice the lenght of the jointer bed ( 90" for the J610 and 94.5" for the G1182Z {on sale $70 off}). If you are only doing small stuff you may be able to get away with a 4" bench top but avoid it if you can see doing rough lumber eventually.

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                • #9
                  wbrooks is right, flatten with a regular planer(jointer/planer). Then parellel the two sides with a thickness planer. That means you need two new tools.
                  Steve

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                  • #10
                    Thanks very much for sharing your knowledge with me. You've been very helpful. Especially in giving me a quotable source to show the wife when she asks me why I need 2 tools!

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                    • #11
                      The machines are very similar. The Griz has an enclosed base and is a bit higher off the ground. The Ridgid has a longer warranty and is available everywhere. The real key to a good performing jointer is knife alignment and that the surfaces are flat and the two tables are coplaner with each other.

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