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Brand new 10 inch radial saw

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  • Brand new 10 inch radial saw

    Hello!This concerns the model RS1000EXC - We finally got it put together, all alignments made. Plugged it in and all it does is hum. The blade won't run. The motor is wired for Multiple 120 or 240. We were attempting to run it at 120. What are we not doing correctly - possible problem that we need to check out? Any help would really be appreciated. We were really disappointed to say the least as we were excited to see what "this toy" would do! Thanks for your help!

  • #2
    Dose the blade spin freely if not raise the blade from the table.
    Andy B.

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    • #3
      Hi, and thanks for your reply but - no - the blade is not resting on the table. There is nothing in the way to interfere with the rotation of the blade. It seems to be more of a "power" issue. Actually, we were wondering where the motor is set to select either 120 or the 240 electrical supply. Maybe that little switch is not set correctly? But where would something like that be located? And then again, maybe that isn't even the problem but something sure isn't right! Any other suggestions? All are welcome!!

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      • #4
        There is no "switch" to switch from 110 to 220. The saw should have been shipped wired for 110. To switch to 220 the saw has to be rewired. This is done where the power cord enters a small connection box, probably mounted on the motor. Are you using an extension cord? This can cause a voltage drop. Have you tried a different outlet? If this info doesn't help, I'm sure someone more knowledgeable about motors will jump in to help you out.
        If it turns out that you have a defective motor, you can probably just take the motor back to HD and get it replaced.
        Lorax
        "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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        • #5
          Hi! We thought that it should be 110 but with the way the literature reads, it sounds like it could be either so that is why we wondered if there was a switch to change from one setting to another. No we plugged it directly into our outlet in the garage. We can try another outlet tomorrow and see if that makes a difference but I suspect that it won't. One item I didn't mention and wonder now about - is that when the blade is hand turned, it seems 'stiff' or 'tight' - it doesn't turn easily. Could that be significant and is there something that can loosen it up or is that the way it should be?

          I dread to think that we may have to take something apart and return it. It was very time consuming to put it all together and do all of the adjustments. Worse still would be the need to return all of it!! We are not planning on a tear down if that is the case! Too much work involved to do that. In fact, if there is too much of a hassle, we would probably just ask for our $$ back. But I would rather not have it develop into a major problem in the first place. We just want it to run!! Wonder what the trouble really is?

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          • #6
            The blade should turn freely, with a slight resistance, but not enough to exert force to make it spin.

            The "switch" is under the motor cover on the right side of the saw. I have wired mine for 240 and it was the easiest of all the machines I wired for 240.

            If the switch is set correctly, the blade seams to be hung up; meaning the motor is turning freely, it is definetly a motor issue. Could be a bad bearing, could be damaged in shipping, could be improperly assembled.

            In any case, I would not tear the thing apart to return it. Return it as you assembled it and let others worry about that. If you decide to get a replacement instead of money back, I suggest you plug it in and run it free of a blade long enough to make sure it runs before doing any assembly.

            I did this with all my machinery before assembly, just to make sure.

            I hope this helps you, at least the slightest little bit.
            John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

            Comment


            • #7
              Thank you for your reply. We believe it is the motor since even without the blade attached, the shaft won't turn. We will contact HD and see how they want to handle it. We do have one major concern that has developed in the course of reading everyone's posts throughout this site - and that is the danger that a RAS poses. Is it extremely dangerous to have and run? We are now wondering if we should have gone with a table saw and a CMS? Does anyone have an opinion on just how dangerous a RAS is to the users? Thanks for any opinions on this subject. [img]smile.gif[/img]

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Skitterbug:
                Thank you for your reply. We believe it is the motor since even without the blade attached, the shaft won't turn. We will contact HD and see how they want to handle it. We do have one major concern that has developed in the course of reading everyone's posts throughout this site - and that is the danger that a RAS poses. Is it extremely dangerous to have and run? We are now wondering if we should have gone with a table saw and a CMS? Does anyone have an opinion on just how dangerous a RAS is to the users? Thanks for any opinions on this subject. [img]smile.gif[/img]
                I have owned a RAS for the past 20 years or more...Haven't used it for years either as a saw that is...For ripping, a table saw is a much safer tool to use..and for mitering a a CMS is better than the RAS. For panel cutting I have a sliding table for my table saw...Why do I still have my RAS? It's a old Wards one that has outputs on the other end for routering, sanding,drilling etc. It will also cut 4X4's in one pass...

                Comment


                • #9
                  As with and tool, you have to know what you're doing and not just think you know what you're doing. This knowledge and skill is even more important when using an RAS.

                  With ripping on an RAS, there is a great danger of kickback. The newer saws incorporate some anti-kickback features, but they don't always work.

                  As far as crosscutting and compound miters go, the RAS has precision that no other saw can touch. (Of course, you have to know what you're doing to get that precision.)

                  An RAS typically has problems with large sheet goods.

                  If you're a beginner, you should start with a table saw. The RAS is best left to experts for the reasons of kickback and that you're actually pulling the blade towards you to make a cut.

                  The RAS is one of the most dangerous stationary tools to use, however, respect is more important that raw fear.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for the replies. Just wanted to say that we did check with HD and they said they would actually put another one together, deliver it and take the "un-working" one back. Couldn't ask for better customer care then that!!

                    And I guess a thought I do have about this RAS is that we do have a 30 day customer satisfaction with it? So we can give it a go and see what we think. A healthy regard for any power tool would be at the top of our list of safety. We have used chain saws, power circular saws, various other small power tools; tractors, combines, and other farm machinery and with each and every piece we have been respectful of its power. So I would guess the same notion applies to this tool as well.

                    I will be looking forward to seeing what kind of projects we can complete with this saw. And if we find we need to rip, perhaps a table saw can be added to the mix then. [img]smile.gif[/img] Oh hum, what's $$ for anyway!

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                    • #11
                      I agree. But they've deserved most of the lumps they got too.. lol

                      Wish there was some way to make these big chains more consistent but I don't think that will ever happen.

                      Jake

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                      • #12
                        The company is very good, they are very customer service oriented and their return policy has caused others to compete, very good for the customer. It is the people they hire sometimes that cause the problems I think. I have a brand new store where I live in Lihue Hawaii and most of the new clerks are great, but there are a couple who view the customer as the adversary. It is just their way to relate and they should be fired. Recently I was waiting in line at the service desk, patiently listening to all the talk for about ten minutes. When it was my turn, someone was walking by behind me and started asking the clerk questions from behind me. The clerk started to answer, talking right through my face to the guy behind. He kept asking more questions, more than I had to ask. After awhile I moved over to another clerk. This was poor clerk training to say the least.

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                        • #13
                          More to this situation!! The delivery crew arrived as scheduled yesterday afternoon but had put together the wrong saw! They brought a TS instead of the RAS that we had. So they promised they would fetch the proper piece of merchandise, put it together and deliver it sometime today. We haven't seen them yet! It could be that they are having a hard time locating it because the stores were sold out in our area. Or maybe they are going to wait until a regular work week. Don't know.

                          I am beginning to wonder if this is a "sign!!" Maybe we should reconsider our purchase? If we ever do get the proper saw, use it and find that we really don't like it, can it be returned to the store then for a refund? Does this fall into the 90 day customer satisfaction if we want to return it and run with the money? All the discussion about the safety of using it has me a bit concerned. I didn't think it would be any more dangerous then any other saw with a running blade but from what I have been reading, it is making me nervous. We thought we had weighed all the options but now we don't know what we should do? Anyone have any feelings to offer on our recent "second guessing?" Thanks [img]smile.gif[/img]

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                          • #14
                            Skitterbug,

                            Don't worry, if you have a company willing to bring you an assebled saw after you had difficulties putting one together you should be greatful.

                            Also, don't be surprised that some one made a mistake. I am sure you have made a mistake in your lifetime too.

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                            • #15
                              If I may add, don't be scared away from the comments about the radial arm saw being unsafe. All power tools are unsafe. What the companies try to do is to minimize the safety risk. A radial arm saw has its own set of safety rules that need to be observed just as there are differences between the safety rules on a combine and those on a farm tractor. Just make sure that you read the safety notes in the instructions (yes, I normally skip those too) and familiarize yourself with the saw's operation and safety features before operating it the first time.

                              If you do that, you will see that the radial arm saw is no less safe than a table saw. It is simply safe in a different manner.

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