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  • Need advice for cordless drills

    Hi, im a guy whos just starting to live on my own. I have a tool box with only some basic tools. I have just decided to buy a cordless drill for basic home projects. When i say basic home projects, i mean stuff like putting up a shelf, building a bookshelf, and other things in those areas. I was hoping to get some advice on what kind of drill i will need. I would also like to know what other tools would be useful that i might also need. Hopefully not too expensive because im on a budget. Thanks for sharing your wisdom.

  • #2
    This is an excellent candidate to start your collection, it may be more than you need right now but at $99 it is hard to beat, about the only possible drawback is the 3/8” chuck might limit you in future projects.

    Woodslayer

    http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/R83001-18V-2-Speed-Drill/

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    • #3
      There is nothing he could need in home repair or woodworking that that 3/8 drill can't handle. had mine for over a year now.
      info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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      • #4
        I would take a look at the Ryobi 1+ tools. You can get a starter kit that comes with 18v drill, circular saw,flashlight, and a palm sander. for around $120. Then as you need to grow your tool selection you can add a number of tools to the set. all the extra tools come without batteries or a charger so the cost is kept down. If you are only using these around the house then these tools will do the job just fine.
        You can find out more info here ...
        http://www.ryobitools.com/index.php/...g/category/C10
        Jeff

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        • #5
          For hobby and homeowner needs only, CuJoHD is correct. I got the Ryobi 8 pc set last year and have not had a problem with any of the tools.
          info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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          • #6
            HD has the Ryobi 18v on sale for about $30.
            I have several ryobi cordless tools and a makita 12v cordless drill. The ryobi set is about 2 years old and the batteries no longer hold a good charge. The makita is about 12 years old and the charge is better than the ryobi new. If you use the drill often, dont go on the cheap.
            www.TheWoodCellar.com

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            • #7
              My last foreman had ryobi... since he will either lose it or it is stolen. Is it anywonder the batterys cost so little. 2 18v for less than 1 12v of a better brand!
              "Diplomacy is saying nice dodging until you can find a rock." Will Rogers
              "If a Monkey can do your job, are you in the right profession?

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              • #8
                If you want the tool to last longer than the warranty, I would recommend a quality 12 or 14.4 volt Ridgid or Milwaukee. Both of these tools will do the jobs you mention, plus if you need it, they have the power to do more. That way you don't have to go back later and buy another tool. I will admit that these are the two that I am most familiar with. I continue to hear more and more bad things about DeWalt, Bosch seams to be ok but might not have smaller voltages, Porter Cable is now owned buy DeWalt and seams to be fading from the picture, and Makita is either hot or cold so you never know. These are just my opinions based on years of observation. Basic advice: "You get what you buy for!"
                Unless you are the lead Dog, the scenery does not change...

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                • #9
                  I meant to say "You get what you PAY for"
                  Unless you are the lead Dog, the scenery does not change...

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                  • #10
                    If you are working around your home consider a good corded drill. Power shouldn't be a problem at home and corded tools are far less expensive than the cordless ones. You can get a very good quality corded drill for the price of an el cheapo cordless.

                    Get quality, then you will own something that will last most if not all of your life. I have never been satisfied with a cheap tool. A year from now when you are drilling through that double oak bandboard or mixing paint you will be glad you went with quality. 30 years from now when you are giving that same drill to your grandson you will be glad you went with quality. Also, working with quality powerful tools is much more enjoyable than always fighting an underpowered poor quality POS. When you have a tough job its not hard to get yourself started knowing that the tools you will use can walk through the project without stressing itself or you.
                    Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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                    • #11
                      I agree with Plumber. IMHO, cordless tools make a lot of sense for on-the-go workers who have no idea of the conditions or power availability of the next job site. But one pays a high price for that portability. Not only do cordless tools cost more, but there is that continuous evolution of battery technology (or is that intelligent design) that may render your tool obsolete with a few years. Batteries are a fortune, and chargers have a reputation for failing at the most inconvenient of times. Probably none of these tools will be useful in 15 or 20 years.

                      However, most good quality "corded" tools will last a lifetime even when they are not taken very well care of. Even "fair" quality corded tools will last almost forever if they aren't abused. For example, I have a $8 drill that I bought in 1967. It is single-speed, 1/4-inch chuck, with bronze bearings. Still works very well, but it's warms up too fast for a lot of drilling.

                      On the quality side, I found a Milwauki Hole-Shooter that my Dad had used for many years in the trades. I have no idea how old that thing is, but it surely has seen decades of use, and very little if any care or maintenance. It looks terrible: dented, marred, rusty chuck, taped up cord, and more scrapes than 40 years could give it. But that thing still works great and has lots of power.

                      CWS

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