Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
HELP!!!! with Drill Purchase Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • HELP!!!! with Drill Purchase

    Hello - Newbie to the forum here. I am out to purchase a new 18v drill / driver for light - mod use at home. I have an 18v Craftsman (3yrs old), that the batteries, and now charger have taken a nosedive. I am confronted with the age old problem of spending more on batteries than the drill is worth. I have researched the heck out of the drill market and am trying to steer clear of ones that will break the bank when the batts die (even though the brand may be great). I have been reading this forum for quite some time and realize that every product has their good and bad points. I have narrowed things down to the following: Love the Ridgid 18v X2- but only if the lifetime service agreement still applies- AND- I have seen some posts where the tool has burned up (no circuit protection???). My other favorite is Ryobi 18v. Great because if you burn out the batteries- 19 bucks at home depot. Plus Consumer Reports gave it a pretty good write up (although this was a year ago). 2nd in line to these would be the hitachi 18v and the dewalt 18v XRP. Please keep in mind that I would be using these mostly for light to mod. use. Can someone please shed some definitive light on this for me- Preferably with suggestions out of the ones I have looked at so far. PLEASE HELP!!! Thanks

  • #2
    I don't use battery-operated tools, simply because for occasional use, the batteries will always need to be charged before I can use them and because they will sit much longer than they will be used, their life expectancy will be minimal!

    So, that said, if you are absolutely convinced that you need a battery-operated drill for your "light to moderate" use, I'd probably go with the Ridgid. Why? For the simple reason that the "limited lifetime service agreement" should keep you in batteries forever.

    However, you should understand that you must register the tool in order to get that "agreement" and also that the "agreement" is between you and Ridgid (NOT Home Depot). That means that when you need the new battery, you must contact your nearest Ridgid Service Center and either take or ship the drill to them; and, then wait until they get a new battery and ship it back to you. From some of the comments I've seen on the forums, that may take some time.

    Battery-operated tools work best and last the longest, when they are used frequently. This is especially true if the batteries are NiCads. NiMh batteries fare a bit better with regard to longevity (recharge-ability), but their ability to hold a charge "on the shelf" is substantially less than NiCads. I'm not sure what type of battery Ridgid uses.

    CWS

    Comment


    • #3
      If you have your heart set on getting an 18V drill/driver then definately go buy one but for "light to mod. use" an 18V is a little on the overkill side. You can save yourself some money and alot of arm fatigue by opting for a 14.4V.

      I'd take a real close look at the Ridgid X2 14.4V drill. The Lifetime Service Agreement is awfully hard to turn down when comparing what other mfgs. are offering at this time.

      The life of a battery is largely based on the quality of the battery itself and also on how the battery was broken in and subsequently recharged. The batteries that came with my 9.6V DeWalt drill are still working after 7 or 8 years of "light to mod. use". The 3 years you got out of your Craftsman batteries should rule them out along with the Ryobi. I'm not familiar with the Hitachi so I can't comment on that one.

      If it were me spending the money, it would be a toss-up between the Ridgid and the DeWalt. Ridgid has the great service agreement and DeWalt has the proven track record.
      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the info.! I looked at Rigid's web site and I assume that the Lifetime service agreement is still in effect if I do buy their tools. Anyone know about the overload protection and if Rigid uses metal gears? Anyone with any other suggestions from my original post PLEASE let me know!!! Thanks!

        Comment


        • #5
          I agree with BadgerDave. The 18V is overkill, especially if you opt for the Ridgid. I have a 18V Ryobi and a 14V Ridgid. The 14V Ridgid in my opinion has better performance than the 18V Ryobi and definitely has a better feel and construction to it.

          Now I do not have the X2 14V, I bought the regular 14V because right now HD is having a nice sale on them in my area. You get the drill with a charger and 2 batteries for $99. That's a nice deal when you slap on the lifetime service on it!

          ghost

          Comment


          • #6
            How about the quality of Ridgid cordless drills vs the others. I know there is brand loyalty, so it isn't always easy to get an unbiased opinion. Also is the lifetime service plan still in effect if I purchase it in the next month or so?

            Comment


            • #7
              Ridgid has the lifetime service agreement so you get free batteries. They are worth it for that alone. I am considering buying another cordless to have around in a pinch and looking at the ridgid 12V.
              \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

              Comment


              • #8
                Gad----some guys don't put two and two together----so what if it's got a lifetime warranty----if it keeps crapping out (as is so often reported on these pages) and you have to send it in for repair (if you don't have a Ridgid service center nearby)------what kind of a bargin is that?

                I've got two Makitas----a 14.4 and 18 v. The first one---the 14.4----I've had for 11 years and the only thing that went out was the charger----the batteries are still going strong and the drill performs top notch. And, I could care less if it did or didn't have a lifetime warranty, since with the exception of $50 for a new charger, I've never needed it. BTW---I'd also agree the 14.4 is your better bet for utility/occassional use.
                Dave

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks for all the help everyone! Here's what I did: After spending waaay too much time at Lowes and HD- I ended up going with a Milwaukee 1/2" 14.4 driver/drill (ironic since I didn't even consider a Milwaukee before). It was $189 for the drill, a belt clip, flashlight, batts, and charger. It also has a rebate for another free battery. As I stated before- I am mostly using it for light to mod use (probably more in the mod range as far has heaviness of tasks). I do alot of drilling in tight spaces where I can only get one hand, and I loved the Rigid but that sucker isn't light (18v or 14.4 X2). I have had a Milwaukee radio for a couple of years and 2 18v batts. The 14.4's also fit in the radio. I went with everyone's suggestion on the 14.4v instead of the 18v. I guess I was (am) a little worried only because my 18v craftsman bogged down on some moderate jobs. Hope I made the right decision!! I plan on getting a corded drill for heavy work- since I do it infrequently. Please give me some feedback, and again- thanks for all the help!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    P.S. Just noticed it is not the "power Plus" version. is this a big deal or not, and will the drill except power plus batts?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The milw. should accept the power plus battery. milw,has the best cordless drill on the market bar none.bosch comes in second.i have fixed every tool on the market.milw.is a solid cordless drill,built to last.
                      A fishing pole is the best cordless tool!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Sweet! Thanks!!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by combat2000:
                          Sweet! Thanks!!!
                          Combat,

                          You won't be sorry with a Milwaukee. Best power tools there are. It's too late, but I was going to suggest a Ryobi if you were looking for an inexpensive home owner grade tool.

                          I personally would not recommend Ridgid or Dewalt powere
                          tools.

                          the dog

                          [ 08-06-2005, 04:39 PM: Message edited by: plumbdog10 ]
                          the dog

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Combat,

                            I agree that you will be happy with your investment

                            Craftsmen power tools exist to give housewives something to buy for Fathers Day or to provide beginners a learning experience.. Their handtools are fine but you did yourself a huge favor by not returning to their cordless, or corded for that matter.
                            Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by plumber:
                              Combat,

                              I agree that you will be happy with your investment

                              Craftsmen power tools exist to give housewives something to buy for Fathers Day or to provide beginners a learning experience.. Their handtools are fine but you did yourself a huge favor by not returning to their cordless, or corded for that matter.
                              Plumber,

                              I agree with your post except the line about hand tools. The last Craftsman tool I bought was a 1/4" Ratchet. I used it to tighten strut clamps. How much torque can that be. After returning two of them because they stripped their gears, I was done.

                              Lifetime warrenties are meaningless when you depend on a tool to get a job done. I should have known, I come from a family of mechanics (both sides of the family). They always warned be about craftsman tools. I learned the hard way.
                              the dog

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X