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12v X2 drill Brake clank?

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  • 12v X2 drill Brake clank?

    My brand new R82015 makes a LOUD couple of "clanks when I release the trigger, and the drill comes to a stop. I assume its the brake. It sounds like the drill is ready to explode.

    I cant believe this is normal

    Help please, this is 2 hrs old

  • #2
    Originally posted by Ron Stevens:
    My brand new R82015 makes a LOUD couple of "clanks when I release the trigger, and the drill comes to a stop. I assume its the brake. It sounds like the drill is ready to explode.

    I cant believe this is normal

    Help please, this is 2 hrs old
    I'm in no way a expert on your drill, but I think because it has the one piece chuck it's the lock engaging that keeps the drill motor from turning when you tighten or loosen the chuck..sort of like the parking pawls on a automatic transmission trying to engage if you shift into park while still rolling...I don't think this is a sign of a bad drill...I have the 18voltX2 with the 2 piece chuck and it doesn't have the locking pawls so it's quiet...

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    • #3
      your drill is perfectly fine, no worrys.

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      • #4
        With my 14.4V RIDGID drill (which is a great drill), I release the trigger slowly. If I just let off all of a sudden, there's the "clank" and sparks from the engagement of the brake. It seems to be a mechanical brake, and not electrical (it holds with the battery removed).

        EDIT: I understand now how this post could be confusing,/misleading. I appologize, and I have corrected this in a later post.

        [ 12-14-2003, 02:14 PM: Message edited by: MorePowerMatt ]

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        • #5
          I knew about the clank, but "sparks" can not be good. that means some metal is being worn down. And you should not have to release handle slowly on a professional power drill that costs the kind of money you paid for this drill.

          They should be made to be beat on at construction quality price, dropped, worked all day, on and off, and keep on ticking

          Jake

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          • #6
            Sparks don't necessarily mean only mechanical grinding. Sparks can also be indicative of the removal of power from an electric motor. Motors are, in theory, a collective of inductor coils. One of the things that inductors cannot do is have the current through them changed in zero time (instantaneously). When you switch the current in zero time, the voltage at the switching point approaches infinity, and that's why there are sometims sparks.

            Letting off the trigger slowly gradually reduces the current to the point that when the switch is opened, there isn't much if any current anyway.

            This phenomenon is noticed mostly in DC applications. Different types of motors also use different types of coils.

            I used to have a Ryobi router that did that (a corded router).

            You don't have to let the trigger off slowly, I just do it to help. There is some mechanical grinding going on, but the same thing is happening in car brakes, etc.

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            • #7
              Yes but car breaks are Designed to do that, and if you think of car breaks, they have to be ground down and replaced.

              As for the sparks. even if this is happening, you should never see them on a consumer tool. If that's truly what's happening, this is a poor tool design or assembly.

              Jake

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              • #8
                Every cordless drill I have ever seen in the higher voltages spark when running, and much more when stopped, especially if its a electronic break instead of a mechanical one. Its the nature of DC motors. The more sparks, the more manly the tool.
                However, of course if your drill is shooting sparks out the sides of the casing, then we might have a problem [img]smile.gif[/img]

                Originally posted by woodworkerjake:
                Yes but car breaks are Designed to do that, and if you think of car breaks, they have to be ground down and replaced.

                As for the sparks. even if this is happening, you should never see them on a consumer tool. If that's truly what's happening, this is a poor tool design or assembly.

                Jake

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