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Homeowner just trying to make the right choice

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  • Homeowner just trying to make the right choice

    The more I read and the more I talk to people in stores the more confused I get. I just want to buy a cordless drill. I'm looking at a 12 or 14 volt. I use a drill heavily maybe twice a year, then light stuff around the house the rest of the time.

    I'm looking at 12 volt dewalt, 14 volt dewalt, 12 volt rigid. I have a B&D firestorm 14 volt that i'm going to return. The B&D doesn't spin true, and I'm worried that it will crap out and I could spend a bit more and get a much better drill.

    I've stumbled my way through building scaffolding with a bunch of 3inch screws, but I don't think i really like the B&D, but it seemed to hold up well.

    Volts, as near as I can tell are mostly about torque. Therefore, a 12 volt dewalt should be better than the 14 volt B&D because of torque. Likewise the rigid 12 should be better than the dewalt 12 and equal to the dewalt 14. I'm leaning to dewalt but that warranty on the rigid, though it's more expensive is interesting.

    I don't want to overkill, but I want something to do the job. Any help on making my way through this. I read bad things about all the drills, because generally only pissed off people post about their tools.

    Any help for a homeowner?

  • #2
    for what you're using it for, any of the big four (dewalt, porter cable, milwaukee, ridgid) will last you and your kids a lifetime. the only limiting factor is the battery pack.

    my dad has a porter cable 14V cordless drill that he's had for 8 years. he does remodeling on the side (part time). the battery is still good.

    since they all run in the same price range, the only difference is the warrenty. For what it's worth, i'd get the 12V or 14V Ridgid, save the receipt and be done with buying cordless for life.

    caspian

    Comment


    • #3
      Caspian

      “for what you're using it for, any of the big four (dewalt, porter cable, milwaukee, ridgid) will last you and your kids a lifetime”

      I disagree with your logic of including Ridgid in a group of well-established portable tool lines while excluding the likes of Bosch and Makita.

      Donut

      As stated prior, any of the quality name brand tools should provide you with a tool that will last you a significant time. I’d go with the one that has the best combination of price, features and what feels the most comfortable to you. You might want to check out the Makita M-Force, they are currently offering rebates on that series. I personally picked up a 14.4 Volt Milwaukee Hammer Drill from HD for $100 when they were clearing out room for the new Ridgid line, I have no complaints with it, even if I would have paid the normal price.

      Good luck

      Woodslayer

      Comment


      • #4
        woodslayer, true, i should have included Bosch and Makita with the grouping of top performers.

        I will stand by my inclusion of Ridgid based on construction of the tool. it is easy to tell just from handling the beginner (B&D, Skill, Ryobi) tools from the high end tools by looking at the construction and tolerances.

        Ridgid will be in the class of the big ones, it will take time to ensure reliablity. The lifetime warrenty will do well in building a strong base of customers to report on durablity.

        As with most products, you get what you pay for. If you pay $39 for a Ryobi, don't expect it to last a lifetime.

        Caspian

        Comment


        • #5
          woodslayer,

          you wrote,

          "I personally picked up a 14.4 Volt Milwaukee Hammer Drill from HD for $100 "

          Gosh,you could have bought all available and made some nice profit on e-bay!


          If warranty was my overriding issue when making a purchase,then I would be driving a Kia.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for the replies.
            Does anyone have any further info on the voltage debate? My main concern is to be able to drill some tough holes when the occasion occasionally arises. I'm assuming a 12 volt ridgid with 350 lbs torque, would outdrill a 14 volt something else with only 300 torque. Is that correct.

            The reason I ask is the 12 volt is much more in my price range but if the diff is that big, I could maybe make the leap to 14 volt.

            Comment


            • #7
              One thing I don't know if you have considered is the trade off on weight between sizes. A 9.6V will do what you are describing if you are only going to occasional heavy use. So would any of the larger drill/drivers. But an 18V hammerdrill and a 9.6V drill/driver are drastically different in handling characteristics due to their weight. If you are primarily looking for a drill/driver for daily around-the-house use I am sure that any of the quality drill/drivers would suffice. You might want to go to your local store with a tool display and handle each size you are considering. Make sure that the batteries are attached since some of the stores like to display the drills without their batteries. If you have a drill/driver that is too heavy you'll be less inclined to use it...While we all talk about the most powerful, sometimes you need to look at the most ergonomic.

              Comment


              • #8
                Torque is inversely correlated to rpm. For example, using the same drill, more torque will be produced in low gear than high gear. So when you compare drills, you have to look at the torque for a given rpm.

                If you are looking at the 12V Ridgids, I would buy the X2. Compared to the 12V compact, it has:
                > more torque
                > a steel chuck with carbide inserts
                > dual, air cooled charger
                > 1/2" chuck
                > higher capacity batteries
                > larger, more powerful motor
                > better build quality (clutch is mounted to drill body)

                I have used both extensively and can tell you that the difference between the two is astounding. The 12V X2 will even outperform the 14.4V compact in every way.

                And, the 12V X2 is competitively priced to deWalts, etc. but has a lifetime warranty, and all the extra goodies.

                In terms of the lifetime warranty, think of the cost of replacing two batteries (which are covered)...

                Comment


                • #9
                  AS far as driving screws any drill is not the best choice. I have 2 Makita 12v impact drivers which have around 900inlbs. and are light and well balanced and can do drilling with hex chuck drills. They so much better because of the torque and lack of user pressure on the fastener required. They are not good for drilling large holes because of their hi rpm. You still need a drill for that. I use them almost always to drive screws of any type except very small ones. If you can try one you will see how much better they are. 'Ridgid'does not make one as of yet as far as I know.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I know I'm beating a dead horse with a stick on this issue, but about the batteries covered in warranties. I read the Warranty and can see why a person would infer coverage as part of wear and tear. But my experience teeny bit of experience in contract law suggests loopholes. ONLY in THE FACT that the company will spend their lifes recharging batteries. This would be a financial drain on the company.( NO PROFIT = NO COMPANY = NO GUARANTEE ) I guess if only 3 months worth of batteries sold may not be that bad. But It's enough to hesitate me til further 3rd party reviews come out.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by woodworkerjake:
                      I know I'm beating a dead horse with a stick on this issue, but about the batteries covered in warranties. I read the Warranty and can see why a person would infer coverage as part of wear and tear. But my experience teeny bit of experience in contract law suggests loopholes. ONLY in THE FACT that the company will spend their lifes recharging batteries. This would be a financial drain on the company.( NO PROFIT = NO COMPANY = NO GUARANTEE ) I guess if only 3 months worth of batteries sold may not be that bad. But It's enough to hesitate me til further 3rd party reviews come out.
                      Get a copy of the Ridgid new power tool family flyer at your local HD and keep it with your receipt.

                      [ 12-11-2003, 09:42 AM: Message edited by: rrmcbride ]

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by woodworkerjake:
                        This would be a financial drain on the company.( NO PROFIT = NO COMPANY = NO GUARANTEE ) I guess if only 3 months worth of batteries sold may not be that bad. But It's enough to hesitate me til further 3rd party reviews come out.
                        Speculation here, but common practice.

                        Ridgid is buffered in the cost of the warrenty on the batteries. They simply upped their price $30 and applied that income to investments. by the time you need new batteries (4 years minimum for general home owner use which 90% of the buyers are) they have made plety of $$ on the investments to cover the cost of batteries. You also have to realize that their cost on batteries is nowhere near the MSRP. So, a $89 MSRP battery actually costs them $30.

                        Caspian

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          "life of the tool", is the warranty. They average life for a nicad battery is about 700 recharges. At that point the life of the tool is over. That would be my take, I guess we will find out a about 4 years. Also in 4 years I dought anybody will be making ni-cad anything because they are toxic when not recycled properly.

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