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  • Ridgid vs. Milwaukee

    I recently bought the 3 piece combo. However, I have really been agonizing over whether I should take it back and get the Milwaukee 18v combo instead, which I really like the feel of. I like the Ridgid drill and the saw. However, the drill has some minor quirks that are beginning to bug me. The T handle takes too long to unscrew to rotate. The chuck takes two hands to use. The Milwaukee has a single-handed chuck and the T handle is much easier to rotate. I know these things are minor, but they have an effect on how enjoyable the drill is to use. The Milwaukee also has similar specs, as far as torque and rpm. The Milwaukee is made in Germany (drill) and USA (saw), and has 5 year warranty. I don't like the "made in China" on the side of the Ridgid tools. I'm also troubled by some of the ebad experiences I've heard on this site about how Ridgid service has declined. I'm also wondering about how this lifetime warranty will work. On the plus side for Ridgid is the battery system and the apparent quality of the tools. They do seem very well built. Any thoughts? As far as other brands, they do not seem to match up - Dewalt is made in Mexico with only a 1 year warranty and B&D as the parent company. Makita and Bosch specs are not as good. PC is too big and heavy. Panasonic drill is very nice, but saw is too small. I'm interested in similar deliberations by others, your final decision, and how you came to it. Thanks.

  • #2
    I had found myself in the same dilema. First I purchased the 18v X2 Drill when I saw "Made in China" I panicked and returned it for the Milwaukee. Then I got over my fear of Chinese tools . I went to return the Milwaukee for the 4pc Ridgid combo. The sales guy at HD talked me out of the Ridgid and into the 5pc Milwaukee. His reason was yes the Ridgid feels like a good tool but the Milwaukee is a proven performer. Anyway I could not be happier with my purchase.

    Comment


    • #3
      I have the milw 18v cordless drill and could not be happier with it. It's fallen out of my 2nd floor window, is full of sawdust and just keeps going.
      I have no experience with ridgids cordless tools, so I will give no opinion, since there is no shortage of opinions from people with no experience on this forum.
      www.TheWoodCellar.com

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      • #4
        Don't state how much you will be using, what for, et al ................ but feel and comfort with a tool is the most important thing to me. If I have top line tool but don't like due to it somehow not feeling right - I don't use is as often. If something feels right I can overcome quirks often too .... I like the word FEEL.
        The ol' Mil line is indeed tried and tested. But I think many giving a bum rap to Dewalt too, without any basis other than the B&D nonsense. Just my opinion of course ---- but I am known to be real hard abuser of tools on daily 8-10 hour basis
        Wish I had the answers ..... even half of \'em

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        • #5
          Milwalkee and for the most part dewalt are proven tools. However I bought 5 of ridgids new power tools in the last month. Love them all the quality is there we will all just have to see if they put it in the right places.

          I have a question about the charger. with it being fancooled and other hi-tech "stuff" inside can it handle any drops or dings. What I mean is, is the charger tough like the tools or what. hopefully someone understands what I'm asking.

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          • #6
            I like your research and reasoning. Before buying a DW drill two years ago I called 18004DEWALT and asked about manufacturing. They said the batteries are assembled in Mexico, but the drill is assembled in North Carolina. That was important to me, I don't know if it is to you.

            Yeah, the Ridgid is built in China, but heck, if it breaks you can get it fixed free.

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            • #7
              Sno Boy, would it concern you if theirs was now made in China? If they were moving more to China?

              I am not looking to pick nits with you, this thread as some have posted has spiraled a bit. The point is, that was then. This is now and the manufacturing landscape for tools of this nature are not the same.

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              • #8
                Got a couple comments here because a couple things irk me when reading all the threads. First of all I find it very hard to give any true feedback on rdigid tools. I did buy a combo set and returned it to return to my trusty dewalt. The reason I returned it was becuase of feel. I like the feel of my dewalt. This is saying nothing negative about ridgid but my two concerns are 1. I can't really trust any ridgid user say this tool is great simply because at the most they have used it two or three months. Every tool is good after two or three months. Its like saying a new car is the best you have ever driven after just the test drive. If that car/drill starts giving you trouble after 6mon, q year, 3 years, 10 years whenever it is, even if it is free to fix, it may become a hassle and be a pain and you may not like it so I guess for the question as should you get Ridgid or Milwaikee. you have three chioces, 1 go with what is proven, Mil is, go with what is new (Ridgid) and hope that it is a good tool, or three flip a coin and take one. My second concern is for someone to say that DeWalt can not be good because B&D owns it. That is stupid. ALL of B&D tools are made overseas (nothing against oversea's manufactoring) and are made in Black and Decker Plants and Dewalt is made in NC, Mexico, Germany, and some in China, I think mainly chargers and batteries but not sure but the bottom like is that they are in different plants. So if you want to try DeWalt don't let B&D slow you down they are the marketleader in powertools for a reason.

                P.S. all this information can be found on DeWalt's website, 1-800-4DeWalt and by talking to users of their tools, and most supply houses and big boxes.

                Comment


                • #9
                  First off, don't rely too heavily on anything any Home Depot employee tells you. The only thing I ever ask the tool guys is if they get many returns on a particular model. Aside from that, their opinion is pretty much worthless. They obviously don't use these tools on a daily basis. If you want the real deal on tools, consult a busy carpenter, electrician, or plumber. Better yet, do what I did and consult your nearest tool service facility. The scoop I got from mine was this:
                  Dewalt is a heavy duty homeowner tool, not that they aren't any good, but definitely NOT the best choice for a pro.
                  Bosch is relatively good, but has some quirks, and the battery packs have a terrible retention system which is prone to breaking.
                  Porter Cable; pretty good, good battery system, but brittle plastic housings on overall tool.
                  Milwaukee; absolutely the best professional grade power tool available overall.
                  I asked what they thought about Ryobi and he just laughed at me.

                  To clarify things, I own cordless (and corded) tools made by B&D, Makita, Craftsman, Porter Cable, Bosch, Ridgid, Ryobi, and Dewalt. I happened to be be at the repair center to have my Bosch 24V cordless drill brushes replaced. I noticed that Dewalt tools there for repair outnumbered all other brands combined.(could also be because they are most popular, not necessarily that they break more). Anyway, in need of a spare drill, I took his advice and bought a Milwaukee 18V hammer drill at HD. Pretty good item, performed fairly well, not very comfortable to me personally, and poor design in terms of hammerdrill selector being integrated into clutch ring (too easy to move past full lock clutch into hammerdrill setting). Good tool overall though. After 2 months though, the charger decided to fry itself. So I return it to HD to get another when the new Ridgid line catches my eye, and get an 18V X2 instead. It is fairly comfortable, has run strong, and the rapid charger definitely kicks ***. Only downside seems to be short (compared to Milwaukee and Bosch) battery life, but with the 1/2 Hr charger this is a very minor problem. On the note of battery life, Dewalt XRP hasn't shown me much more than Ryobi in this department.
                  So take what you want from this, sometimes it's a matter of trial and error to find what works for you. As strictly a homeowner, any of the above will be more than good enough, and I still believe Ryobi can't be beat for the money in terms of handyman useage. On a professional note however; Personally, I still love my Bosch 24V drill the best, quirks and all (it took 3+ years of every other day use to fry the motor), the Milwaukee was very good, but just not for me, and the jury's still out on the Ridgid, but so far so good.
                  Let those who ride decide!

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                  • #10
                    Toolesq

                    I can’t comment on the new line of Ridgid tools having never used them but the Milwaukee tools I own have proven to be top quality and have served me admirably. On the issue of a single versus duel sleeve chuck being a minor inconvenience, this is true if you are accustomed to a duel sleeve, but if you are used to a single sleeve and switch to a duel, the extra little hassle of using both hands turns into an annoyance.

                    Woodslayer

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by FordBoy:
                      First off, don't rely too heavily on anything any Home Depot employee tells you. The only thing I ever ask the tool guys is if they get many returns on a particular model. Aside from that, their opinion is pretty much worthless. They obviously don't use these tools on a daily basis. If you want the real deal on tools, consult a busy carpenter, electrician, or plumber.
                      Although you're precisely right about most HD employees not being everyday, professional tool users, there's another way of looking at things. No, I'm not a professional carpenter or anything. What I am, though, is someone who spends 40 hours a week talking to professionals. You, the guy on the street, occasionally run into a pro who has an accurate and well-developed opinion about the tools he's been using in his career. I see twenty of these guys a day, and I can't bullsh*t them about what they should be buying. So, even though I don't own one of each brand on the market, I'll bet I've got a database of feedback on the quality of each that exceeds anyone's except the Service Center types you mentioned.

                      For the record, FordBoy, the feedback I get is pretty much in line with what you've heard at the service facility. I sell a lot of DeWalt, but the guys who really know the tools buy Milwaukee. I'm converting more DeWalt users than Milwaukee users to the Ridgid camp.

                      [ 11-21-2003, 01:03 PM: Message edited by: SuperDave ]

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                      • #12
                        SuperDave,
                        Do you think alot of Milwaukee users shop at The Home Depot?

                        I'm sure that Home Depot relies upon sales history to determine which lines of tools that they carry, if so, there are very few Milwaukee tools in Home Depot...or Lowes for that matter.

                        Milwaukee tools are generally bought by contractors, especially plumbers (like my father in law) and these customers don't shop at The Home Depot.

                        On the other hand, when I walk through Home Depot I see alot of Orange (Ridgid), but also alot of Yellow. That has to tell you something.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The fact that Costco carries exclusively Dewalt combo sets tells me a lot about the target market for Dewalt tools. This is not necessarily a negative thing, just as the fact that Ridgid tools are sold through HD does not make them any less quality. I just get the distinct sense that Milwaukee has aimed at the professional users as its target market. If so, I expect that their tools will have to be good in order to maintain the respect of the pros, since their sales will not be supported as much by homeowner sales. It certainly seems that way from the responses on this forum. This brings me back to the question of which combo set to buy. I just want to get and use tools that feel right and will consistently perform for a long time. I guess I will just have to use the Ridgid tools I have to see if if this is true with their tools, if I can get used to some of the minor quirks. I'll keep using the Ridgid combo for the next two months so that I can make a more informed decision.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Sno Boy, like it or not, the bottom line at retail is gross sales. That's why you see so much yellow and orange at Home Depot. DeWalt has appeal to both contractor- and consumer-grade buyers, and probably outsells its' nearest competitor by a wide margin. Ridgid, of course, is pretty much a Home Depot exclusive, and will therefore be getting all possible deference in the display process.

                            As corporate policy, Home Depot is trying very hard to garner more contractor business. They know Milwaukee's value to that audience, and even though DeWalt sells greater volume, Milwaukee isn't going away any time soon at HD. In my personal case, I think I've got a nice Milwaukee representation. In fact, they basically rule my corded-tool lineup - drills, sawzalls, circ saws, etc. I've got the heavy-duty battery-operated stuff (Milwaukee customers aren't looking for a 12v drill, you know). I've got that delicious cordless kit with the hinged sawzall that I wish Ridgid would build (hint [img]smile.gif[/img] ).

                            Right now, I'm talking to the Milwaukee customers about Ridgid tools, and more directly selling the DeWalt people Ridgid tools. Assuming Ridgid captures a significant market share, that's where I believe it's going to come from.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by SuperDave:
                              </font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by FordBoy:
                              First off, don't rely too heavily on anything any Home Depot employee tells you. The only thing I ever ask the tool guys is if they get many returns on a particular model. Aside from that, their opinion is pretty much worthless. They obviously don't use these tools on a daily basis. If you want the real deal on tools, consult a busy carpenter, electrician, or plumber.
                              Although you're precisely right about most HD employees not being everyday, professional tool users, there's another way of looking at things. No, I'm not a professional carpenter or anything. What I am, though, is someone who spends 40 hours a week talking to professionals. You, the guy on the street, occasionally run into a pro who has an accurate and well-developed opinion about the tools he's been using in his career. I see twenty of these guys a day, and I can't bullsh*t them about what they should be buying. So, even though I don't own one of each brand on the market, I'll bet I've got a database of feedback on the quality of each that exceeds anyone's except the Service Center types you mentioned.

                              For the record, FordBoy, the feedback I get is pretty much in line with what you've heard at the service facility. I sell a lot of DeWalt, but the guys who really know the tools buy Milwaukee. I'm converting more DeWalt users than Milwaukee users to the Ridgid camp.
                              </font>[/QUOTE]For starters, I didn't mean to offend any HD employees by what I stated. I was one for a short time, and I consider many current HD employees among my friends. However, you nearly backed up my opinion with your own words. Neither you or any other HD employee uses these tools enough to know for sure. Your knowledge is mostly either second hand (from contractors or homeowners) or second hand (and extremely biased) from factory reps. Again, this isn't a slight on you personally, you seem to be rather knowledgeable overall, but it's more a matter of " you'll never know unless you've been there". In no way was I calling you (or any unnamed HD employee) "worthless". I just feel it is hard for you to have a "true" opinion on tools and their idiosynchrocies (sp?), without having used them for an extended period on a regular (daily) basis, as I have. On the subject of specs and prices I'm sure you have me beat hands down.
                              Again- no hard feelings, I hope, and maybe we'll actually cross paths sometime. I live in Monmouth County.
                              BTW- your last name isn't Osborn is it? just kidding.
                              Let those who ride decide!

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