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Ridgid Cobalt Drill Bit -- Is this supposed to happen?

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  • Ridgid Cobalt Drill Bit -- Is this supposed to happen?

    Half an hour ago i bought a Ridgid Cobalt 5/16" drill bit. I drilled it through a 1/8" stainless steel plate about 7 times until it stopped working. The bit was all jacked and cut up and couldn't make it through anymore. I'm a bit new to using power tools and all that, and I realize that steel is pretty tough stuff, but isn't this what the drill bit was made for?
    So basically i'm just wondering if i got a lousy bit or if what happened is just what happens. Thanks for any help -- kevin

  • #2
    How many RPM's were you turning? You may have built up too much heat and fried the bit.
    I decided to change calling the bathroom the "John" and renamed it the "Jim". I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.

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    • #3
      Sounds right BD..
      1/4" - 3/8" is about 1000 RPM in Steel with oil lube.
      Also 5/16" is a wee large to use as a starter bit.
      I would be inclined to go 1/8,3/16,1/4,5/16 at a minimum depending on how fast the drilling went.

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      • #4
        I would go 3/16, 5/16 with a good cutting oil. This does not include lubricating oil.
        Lorax
        "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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        • #5
          I would have suggested using titanium on SS not cobalt. But the rest of the advise is right on the money.
          Jeff

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          • #6
            I've been drilling steel for years and have never had to sharpen a bit. I always use a press or a mill and plenty of cutting fluid. Drilling with a hand drill is a ***** unless you're drilling something less than 16 gauge. I even bought the max model of the Drill Doctor years ago and have never used it. I use good HSS or Tin coated.

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            • #7
              Relton Rapid-Tap is my favorite product and works great on 304 and 316 SS.
              http://www.relton.com/relpdf.htm
              (scroll down to the chemicals section, look at pg 25)



              Rapid Tap

              Bit speed, bit pressure, and feed rate are key when drilling SS, as they are in most drilling operations.

              Keytap is another I have heard of but have not used.

              I have no connection to either manufacturer, just a happy user of Rapid-Tap

              [ 09-28-2005, 04:28 PM: Message edited by: Bob D. ]

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              • #8
                Originally posted by paulgrandy:
                I've been drilling steel for years and have never had to sharpen a bit. I always use a press or a mill and plenty of cutting fluid. Drilling with a hand drill is a ***** unless you're drilling something less than 16 gauge. I even bought the max model of the Drill Doctor years ago and have never used it. I use good HSS or Tin coated.
                paulgrandy,

                Obviously you do not work in the construction field, where using a drill press is not always an option. Not all holes are drilled in flat-stock.

                I'm with Bob D. on Rapidtap. But stainless steel is tough to drill. Even with care (rpms & lubrication) drills eventually dull.

                the dog

                [ 09-28-2005, 09:26 PM: Message edited by: plumbdog10 ]
                the dog

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