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table saw blade guard use....revisited

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  • table saw blade guard use....revisited

    not long ago there was a thread about to use or nor to use the blade guard on the table saw (mine is a 3612). anyway, there were valid points on both sides of the debate.

    i believe it was daveferg (sorry if i have you confused with someone else) who made the valid argument about teaching your children right and they are all about like father like son. even though my son is only 8 mos old, i get in the habit of not only removing the keyes from the tools and locking them in my tool box, but also i secure power to the machines. if we stay here i will bulld a new garage with a shop and that shop will have an electrical panel with a lock out so in addition to securng the keys of the switches, a key will be required to turn power on to the shop.

    ok back to my point, the debate of the saw blade guard and "like father like son" i bought my son one of those litle work bencches, it has a bunch of tools, a bunch of hammer.screw holes and a talbe saw blade with a mitre gague.this is what trupped me out...NO GUARD ON THE TABLE SAW BLADE. got a chuckle out of that!

    ed
    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

  • #2
    Build one for it.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      Excellent point Ed. Can't remember if it came up in the other thread, but I found, in two seperate ww'ing mags, pictures of people using gloves while working around power tools.

      At one point in my job, I was beginning to wonder if I'd chosen the wrong career, as jobs lately have been scarce. But then, on a recent client visit, we were reviewing a statewide OSHA newsletter. They proudly proclaimed that there was a reduction in fatalitites on the job----last year, there were ONLY 500 killed at work. That's great unless you were one of the 500.

      Anyway, between that, the mag articles and toy mfgs, tell your kids---there will ALWAYS be loads of work in the safety profession.
      Dave

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      • #4
        well it looks like i got an older model. i was on their website today "little tykes" and the new sawmaster workbench in the photo shows a guard over the blade. its also got the cutest thinga piece of plastic made to look like wood magnetically held together so that when he runs it over the saw it cuts. too cool!
        \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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        • #5
          I like your thinking and your care with starting your son off on the right track and being ever so mindful of safety.

          When I was 14, my father removed two fingers and mangled a third while using a table saw with a molding head. We were working late one night in a new home where my father was contracted to build the kitchen cabinets. He was tired after a very long day and he obviously made a mistake. Fortunately we were only a couple of miles from home and we "flew" there and my mother and a neighbor took him to the hospital. I cleaned the car and the worksite the next day. It was a lesson well learned. It only takes a second of lax attention to cause irrepairable harm!

          Today I have grandson that just loves working with tools and building stuff. He's only five now, but already has shown a knack for assembly of wooden toys (take a look at those Tonka/Hasbor wooden kits at Walmart). Since the time when he could barely crawl, he has been curious about everything, especially if it has buttons and switches. I've put together a nice set of small-sized, real tools for him, including a hammer, small saw, several pliers, wrenches, etc. Note that there is no screwdrivers there though! Too easy to poke or stab yourself if not careful. I did buy him a neat little B&D alkaline power driver that can even drill holes. It is small and fits his little hands nicely. The drill bits I keep locked up with the sharp tools and all of this is only used in my shop when he visits and wants to build something with "Grandpa".

          "SpaceBlue", your extra effort to lock up the power is exactly what I have done. No switch keys, no live circuits, and main panel is under lock and key, and the work shop is also locked with all the keys kept in a place unknown to him. It is great having someone that we can teach and share our hobby with, but I couldn't forgive myself if my neglect hurt him in any way.

          Regards,

          CWS

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by spacebluesonoma:
            i believe it was daveferg (sorry if i have you confused with someone else) who made the valid argument about teaching your children right and they are all about like father like son. even though my son is only 8 mos old, i get in the habit of not only removing the keyes from the tools and locking them in my tool box, but also i secure power to the machines.
            Originally posted by CWSmith:
            Today I have grandson that just loves working with tools and building stuff. He's only five now, but already has shown a knack for assembly of wooden toys (take a look at those Tonka/Hasbor wooden kits at Walmart). Since the time when he could barely crawl, he has been curious about everything, especially if it has buttons and switches. I've put together a nice set of small-sized, real tools for him, including a hammer, small saw, several pliers, wrenches, etc. Note that there is no screwdrivers there though! Too easy to poke or stab yourself if not careful. I did buy him a neat little B&D alkaline power driver that can even drill holes. It is small and fits his little hands nicely. The drill bits I keep locked up with the sharp tools and all of this is only used in my shop when he visits and wants to build something with "Grandpa".

            "SpaceBlue", your extra effort to lock up the power is exactly what I have done. No switch keys, no live circuits, and main panel is under lock and key, and the work shop is also locked with all the keys kept in a place unknown to him. It is great having someone that we can teach and share our hobby with, but I couldn't forgive myself if my neglect hurt him in any way.
            Forget all the crap you see on TV and read in the rags. This is the mark of a man. The things you teach your children today will carry on through generations.

            Al
            America:<br />The land of the free<br />Because of the brave.

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