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  • Ridgid Jointer

    I am looking to buy a jointer. I know nothing about them other than what they do.
    I was at Home Depot this morning and they have the Ridgid 6 1/8 inch 1 hp with a stand for 399.00. I was looking for a bench top for around 200.00 to 300.00 max.
    Could someone tell me more about the Ridgid name and how its associated with Craftsmen?? Sears has a bench top (249.00) i think it was 1 1/2 hp 6 1/8 that i was tempted to get, but it has to be ordered..I need help here!!! I dont know what to buy. I really didnt want to spend 400.00. I know this is a ridgid forum and you wont say much bad about it so tell me whats good about it.
    Thanks in advance..
    H [img]smile.gif[/img]

  • #2
    Rigid hasn't been with Craftsman for I think over 6 years now.

    As to the Rigid jointer.

    My personal opinion is that it is one of the best 6" jointers out there. The current price is awsome. It will out do ANY bench top jointer you are looking at. I spent four hours at a freinds house not to long ago trying to get his POS craftsman benchtop jointer set up right. Never could get it close enough for me, but it does ok doing the edges. Not too good on facing.

    If you can afford the Rigid, get it. You won't be sorry.
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    www.patriotguard.org

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    • #3
      Well Howie, Craftsman is not where it's at. If you'd like a more independent analysis of what to buy, go over to the WoodNet.Net forum. You'll find that Craftsman doesn't get a look in...!!

      The Ridgid at the present close-out pricing takes some beating.

      David

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      • #4
        David,

        Are you seeing closeout pricing on the RIDGID jointer? It's still $399 around here.

        Dave
        Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

        Comment


        • #5
          It's $349 here, as well as the TP1300 being less than I paid for them!
          Support Our Troops!
          www.mnpatriotguard.org
          www.patriotguard.org

          Comment


          • #6
            I purchased the Ridgid jointer because it was slightly more compact than its competitors, and was well-priced. Reviews on the net also seemed in favor. At $400 I wasn't expecting a lot, and time will tell if AVVIE's comments hold true for the motor. If the rest of the machine works well and holds up, it would be worth throwing a quality motor on it in the event of a failure. Most of my floor tools are Delta, but that's no guarantee of longevity or quality. Their designs can be crude, and parts can, and do, fail. I was impressed by the Ridgid's setup. All parts were there and well-organized, and assembly was straight-forward. I did the assembly upright, as I was afraid I might not be able to get the thing off its back by myself. You just have to get down underneath with a flashlight to find the assembly holes. I did have to do a minor alignment of the fence mount, but everything else was spot-on, including the blades. It runs smoothly and quietly, and with my portable extraction system hooked to the dust chute, there's not a crumb of sawdust to be found after jointing. So far I have only done a few test runs with some Maple, but it came out smooth and straight. The only problem so far: The bottom edge of the cutterhead guard sits 3/4" off the table surface. I was planing an S2S board exactly the width of the cutter head (I never reached the minimum planing thickness of 1/2" recommended in the instructions). When the board was cut down just enough to slide under the notch in the guard (which I assume it's supposed to do - thereby not moving the guard aside), the board jammed between the fence and the underside of the guard near its pivot point. I had to turn off the machine to extricate the board. I would have to look at the fences of other brands to compare, but I think this is a dangerous design. The underside of the guard should come close to the table surface and be pushed aside during all planing operations. There is also a point in planing where the board gets thin enough to not quite slide under the guard, thereby causing a jam. Additionally, when the guard does not swing aside, it gets in the way of the push blocks when trying to move the timber through the machine. I'm not sure what to do about this jamming tendency. I am actually considering machining off some material from the underside of the guard casting to allow it to rest closer to the table top. If this problem exists on all the Ridgid jointers, I can tell you that, when your board gets thin enough to slide under the head guard, you had better be ready for a jam. Also, you cannot plane at the full width of the cutterhead without causing a jam between the fence and the guard out near its pivot point. This is my first jointer, and maybe there's something I'm not getting, but I can tell you that things get a bit scary with this guard situation.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by wmetcalf:
              I purchased the Ridgid jointer because it was slightly more compact than its competitors, and was well-priced. Reviews on the net also seemed in favor. At $400 I wasn't expecting a lot, and time will tell if AVVIE's comments hold true for the motor. If the rest of the machine works well and holds up, it would be worth throwing a quality motor on it in the event of a failure. Most of my floor tools are Delta, but that's no guarantee of longevity or quality. Their designs can be crude, and parts can, and do, fail. I was impressed by the Ridgid's setup. All parts were there and well-organized, and assembly was straight-forward. I did the assembly upright, as I was afraid I might not be able to get the thing off its back by myself. You just have to get down underneath with a flashlight to find the assembly holes. I did have to do a minor alignment of the fence mount, but everything else was spot-on, including the blades. It runs smoothly and quietly, and with my portable extraction system hooked to the dust chute, there's not a crumb of sawdust to be found after jointing. So far I have only done a few test runs with some Maple, but it came out smooth and straight. The only problem so far: The bottom edge of the cutterhead guard sits 3/4" off the table surface. I was planing an S2S board exactly the width of the cutter head (I never reached the minimum planing thickness of 1/2" recommended in the instructions). When the board was cut down just enough to slide under the notch in the guard (which I assume it's supposed to do - thereby not moving the guard aside), the board jammed between the fence and the underside of the guard near its pivot point. I had to turn off the machine to extricate the board. I would have to look at the fences of other brands to compare, but I think this is a dangerous design. The underside of the guard should come close to the table surface and be pushed aside during all planing operations. There is also a point in planing where the board gets thin enough to not quite slide under the guard, thereby causing a jam. Additionally, when the guard does not swing aside, it gets in the way of the push blocks when trying to move the timber through the machine. I'm not sure what to do about this jamming tendency. I am actually considering machining off some material from the underside of the guard casting to allow it to rest closer to the table top. If this problem exists on all the Ridgid jointers, I can tell you that, when your board gets thin enough to slide under the head guard, you had better be ready for a jam. Also, you cannot plane at the full width of the cutterhead without causing a jam between the fence and the guard out near its pivot point. This is my first jointer, and maybe there's something I'm not getting, but I can tell you that things get a bit scary with this guard situation.
              As stated on other location - what are you doing here? I don't understand what you are saying.

              I don't own this model (HF and Grizz here) but have used it. And wish I did own it, especially now with current pricing. It's designed as well - and safely - as any of them and quite smooth IMO.
              I've read and re-read your post and just not sure what you are actually doing. And visually having hard time "seeing" it - don't do anymore cutting until you get this answered or clarified-it never should jam up. Dangerous - way to dangerous.
              Can you explain set-up you did?
              Wish I had the answers ..... even half of \'em

              Comment


              • #8
                See my post in "Ask the woodworking experts (dangerous Fence)." I think Its a little clearer there.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I just bought the Ridgid Jointer/Planer. After looking at some other brands, Delta and Jet, I really liked the look of the Ridgid machine. So far I'm not disappointed. The packing was exceptional and I liked the way they have the small items in a blister pack instead of bagging them. It's a heavy dude and I ended up taking it down to my basement shop in pieces. I still don't have it together as of yet but everything fits well so far.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    A question for wmetcalf... the directions say to mount the bed to the stand in an upside down position. I'm doing this alone so I'm not too keen on assembling this heavy dude like that. I noticed you seem to have assembled the unit by yourself also. Is this correct and that you mounted the bed to the stand right-side-up?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I put mine together by myself. I did it just like the instructions said, then stood it up (again by myself). It's a little heavy, but it wasn't all that hard to put the stand upright. And I'm not a very big guy!
                      Support Our Troops!
                      www.mnpatriotguard.org
                      www.patriotguard.org

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Howie I just got mine together last night. I assembled the unit the same way as wmetcalf. I mounted the motor to the base as per the directions but sat the unit upright to mount the bed to the stand. The bed unit, although heavy, was managable. I removed the cosmolene with WD40. Checked the fence to bed square, using a machinist square, and there was I surprised. I figured there might be some error but both infeed and outfeed tables were right-on. I'd buy this one again.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Bought my Ridgid jointer in November but was able to get price rollback during the 20% off feeding frenzy, which combined with 10% at time of purchase made for a very happy buying experience.

                          You can get 10% off either by opening a credit card account or through 10% moving discount being offered.

                          I'd stay away from any bench top jointer, regardless of price: The bed is too short and the fences are suspect. Also beware Sears HP ratings, they're grossly overstated; check the amperage and you'll see.

                          My jp is of the Emerson variety, and I couldn't be happier with it. Balls on out of the box. As stated above the best packaging I've ever seen. I've seen some complaints about height (lack thereof), but with a shop-made mobile base it's perfect for me (6' tall).

                          Hope this helps and good luck,
                          Jack

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