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  • x2 batteries junk

    I don't have time for this. Obviously, because I bought this X2 package last fall. From the beginning, the batteries overheated, and therefore the charger says "DEFECTIVE". If you let them cool, they would eventually charge. Now, one of two, will not charge at all. This has probably been covered before, but I don't care. I am a professional contractor, and I thought I was buying tools that were built for contractors. These batteries are crap. Or, is it the charger. To reiterate, I make my living using tools. I don't have time to wait for some battery that wouldn't be hot by any other manufacturers standards to cool down, and then go bad in less than a year. You can easily expect a year out of any cordless battery, ran hard or not. Mind you, I know what you will say. The batteries were over worked. No they were not.
    Glad I got that lifetime warranty "on everything"!
    Plan on Rigid replacing them immediately and continuously until they get it right.

  • #2
    I own the 4pc. combo kit and have had great success so far. Couple of pointers on batteries; never drain the battery all the way down. As soon as you feel a loss in power, take the battery off and charge it up; don't leave them charging over night. Go by what the manufacterer recommends; don't help a battery heat up or cool down. All these things will kill the batteries prematurely. Also, it will take 3-6 cycles of charging and using before all cells in the battery pack are actively working. Then and only then will you get an evaluation as to the running time of your batteries. Oh, by the way there are only two main producers of batteries for all major tool companies and they are Panasonic and Sanyo. Hope this helps.

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    • #3
      Thanks Jim, but that really doesn't help me. I guess I should have bought Dewalt, Milwaukee, Porter Cable, Makita, Hitachi, or what I really wanted - Bosch, but I thought I was getting a good deal on the Ridgid, with "LIFETIME" warranty. If there are only 2 battery manufactures, Ridgid needs to switch to the other company. And finally, no offense, don't tell a contractor to not run their battery all the way down, it's a tool. I didn't but it to show my beer drinking buddies on weekends. There are just certain situations in building that you can't stop at half charge and recharge.
      I've never had a problem with my $80 Chinese Craftsman back up drills batteries, and never had a problem with my Porter Cable until it just got understandably old and beat.

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      • #4
        then by all means, GO BUY ANOTHER KIT!!!

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        • #5
          DMW, I understand you are using your tools to make a living just as I do so maybe I can offer you a little information to help you out. The battery charger is only doing you a favor by warning you that a problem exist. When Ni-cad batteries get hot, it is a good idea to let them cool before putting them back on a charger. This holds true with any brand of tool. Unlike the person that claims you should take the battery and put it on the charger as soon as you see it losing power, this is not true! Run the battery down, then let it cool and only then put it back on the charger. Nicad batteries should always be discharged prior to recharging and should be cool as well. This will extend the battery life and give you a lot more service. It also prevents the memory effect. When you don't allow the battery to discharge, it will not accept a full charge the next time. Ni-cads also last much longer when you allow them to cool before charging. Just purchase a couple of extra batteries and keep them on hand. Rotate between charged, hot, and charging. This way you always have a fresh battery and will extend the life of you purchase not to mention less headaches from worrying about losing time and money because your batteries won't charge. I own Ridgid cordless as well as Dewalt cordless drills and have never had a battery failure. My oldest Dewalt battery pack lasted four years of daily use and my oldest Ridgid pack is over two years old and still going strong just like it didi when it was new. I hope this information will help you out and wish you great sucess in the future.

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          • #6
            With all due respect to Jim, who was trying to help----I have to agree---contractor or not, you shouldn't have to baby a product to get it to work---chargers have been made,for years, that will sense when a battery is charged and shut off.

            Really sorry about your problems. Obviously, from the accumulation on this board, there are bad batteries out there--bad chargers or whatever.
            Dave

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            • #7
              I'm just trying to give you guys some valid advise to help you out. Trust me, you do not want to drain your batteries all the way. There have been several articles on this issue and all state that draining NiCd or NiMH batteries all the way is damaging. Also, I called tech support for Ridgid and Dewalt and was told the exact same thing, not to drain them completely. If you can get your hands on a copy of American Woodworker(January 2004) on page "8" it explains the misuses of battery packs. DMW possibly you got a lemon. It does happen when millions are being mass produced. And for the Canadians you can check out this months Canadian Home Workshop mag on page "54" it also mentions the correct battery charge procedure. If you still are in misbelief, please give one of the tech support people a call at any power tool company and you will get the 411 first hand. Just trying to help.

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              • #8
                Jim is right about the batteries...the reason you do not drain all the way down is each 1.2V NiCd or MiMH cell that makes up a battery...10 for 12v, 12 for 14.4v and 15 for 18v all charge and discharge a different unknown rate. Therefore when you are using a tools on 1.2v cell may discharge in 30 min and another in 1 hour. But the nice thing is it will recharge at the same rate compared to the other tools that it discharged. So if you charge when you feel a decrease in power and throw it on the charger then when you take it off the charger you should have a full battery. Draining it all the way down will make you get a battery that is only 1/2 or 3/4 full. Hope this clear things up

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                • #9
                  I'm not denying the draining issue Bo and Jim state----but, you'll have to remember, there was a great deal of information, a few years ago which said just the opposite----that if you didn't completely drain batteries, you'd only realize a 70-80% charge. I've been pretty much following the "drop in power" re-charge point with no problems---but again, things like not leaving batteries in the charger---etc., that's what chargers are supposed to do----shut off when the battery is charged and come on when the charge drops.

                  I've had Makita cordless drills for over 15 years and with the exception of one charger that went bad, have never had a problem with pretty heavy home use. To me, if one mfg. can achieve these standards, anyone who prices their products in the same pricing should meet them as well.
                  Dave

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                  • #10
                    Dave:

                    I agree with you that if one man. can do it they all can do it. But you can not compare your 15 yr old Makita to today's drills. first of all you where using it for home use and not on a jobsite or in manufacturing and second...look at the speed and torque that the Makita was producing 15 yrs ago and look at the speed and torque we have now. Producing more speed and more torque will only drain the battery faster. Hence the reason that no matter the manufacture of the power tools they all have battery problems

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                    • #11
                      Bo---agree with you on the increased power demands, but also, I cannot remember them even having an 18v. drill 15 years ago---so there's been some power increases. I also realize there's no comparrison between a contractor and my home use (though have to say, just about every project I tackle includes my cordless drills.

                      But I respectfully disagree that there's no differences. These Ridgid tools have been out for just about a year---the bulk likely sold in Nov. & Dec. and into Jan. 2004, due to the lifetime warranty. Even under commercial use, I really don't think they should be failing at this rate---or at least the number of complaints we see on this board.
                      Dave

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                      • #12
                        Dave:

                        I agree with you on that and that is one of the reason i do not own a Ridgid Cordless tool. I will never jump to an unproven brand for a warrenty or price. However in defense of ridgid there are probally two reason why we hear so much negativity on this board...(1) Pissed off people are more willing to complain then happy people are to praise. (2) People are misguided by the Warrenty. First they think if the tool had a lifetime warrenty then it must actually last a lifetime and alot of us guys seem to think that misusing the tool is ok and that Ridgid and HD should give us a new tool!!!!

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                        • #13
                          Yeah, obviously, no one is going to admit to mis-use. While complaints would certainly be more concentrated here----over on Woodnet, a pretty good sized forum, you don't usually hear too many other brands dissed. Hey, who knows, but I'm with you---something new comes out----let someone else be the first to try it. In fairness, there certainly do seem to be far fewer, if any, comments about the corded tools. The only thing I could say first hand, is last year, I had some Christmas money and wanted a hammer drill. Ridgid had their demos/display so I tried their hammer drill out on some cinderblock (no, not the HD walls---a demo piece ). Anyway, the drill, no matter how hard I tried----checked this and that----it would only drill maybe quarter inch deep and quit---no the depth stop wasn't extended. And, while I know this was a demo drill---there were only about 2-3 dozen holes drilled and about 1/3, didn't go very deep. I bought a Milwaulkee.
                          Dave

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