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TS3650 Belt...Easy To Buy Replacement?

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  • TS3650 Belt...Easy To Buy Replacement?

    I haven't even finished assembling my new saw yet, but I want to know if a replacement drive belt can be purchased from some other source other than HD / Ridgid. Obviously it is not like a standard V-belt that one can pick up at a hardware store... I would just like to have a replacement or two in my shop in case I ever need it. Any alternate sources come to mind? Thanks!

    Greg

  • #2
    Greg - I don't know for certain, but since the 3650 uses a serpentine style belt, you may be able to replace it with an automotive belt. Take the belt with you and try an automotive parts store or a radiator shop.

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    • #3
      Awhile back someone, I apologize for not remembering who, posted that a Bando American-Industrial Power Transmission Product Model 417-J will fit the Ridgid saw. If you go to their website at BANDO you can locate a Bando distributor in your area. HTH.
      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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      • #4
        MY 3650 HAS A DAYCO BELT ON IT I'LL TRY AND GET NUMBER TONIGHT...DAYCO COMMON NAME IN THE AUTOMOTIVE IND..

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        • #5
          Thanks very much you guys for the information... I do appreciate it!

          Greg Nold

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          • #6
            belt on my ts3650 is and 420J DAYCO 3003X
            TOM

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            • #7
              Why not just buy a link belt? Cut way down on vibation and you'd have a spare for your other belt driven machines. You can get it in 4 foot long sections and cut to length

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              • #8
                Jim,

                A link belt won't work on the Ridgid saw unless you change out the pulleys. Ridgid contractor saws utilize a multi groove pulley instead of the conventional single groove pulley. My 3612 easily passed the nickel test when I set it up and it still is basically vibration free. Haven't tried but I'll bet it would pass a dime test.

                Dave
                Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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                • #9
                  Dave,
                  I agree with you about the nickle test, my 3650 will do that with the factory belt, but you lost me on the multi groove puley part. The 3650 uses a single pulley (1 belt) not like a high power cabinet saw 2 belt system.
                  Or are you refering to the way the pulleys are machined? I always thought that as lonng as you buy the right size link belt 3/8 or 1/2 it could go in any pulley of the same size.
                  Thanks,
                  Jim

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                  • #10
                    Jim,

                    Run your hand over the outside diameter of one of the pulleys and then on the inside of the belt. Feel the grooves? Thats what I meant when I said multi grooved pulley. Because there basicaly wouldn't be anything for the link belt to grab ahold of they just won't work very well with the Ridgid saws. I'm by far no expert when it comes to this type of stuff. Maybe someone else can shed a techno reason or two.

                    Dave
                    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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                    • #11
                      I belive the advantage of a multi-groove pulley/belt system is the greater contact surface area between the belt and pulley.

                      With a V-belt you get contact on the two sides only, unless your belt is worn or the pulley is the wrong size then you get contact on the face (the edge of the belt that faces towards the shaft) and slippage on the sides which results in reduced friction to grab the belt.

                      Multi-grooved pulleys have contact on each groove face. If you add up the total contact surface area I think you will find it is greater than a v-belt system for a relatively equal sized belt. Multi-groove belets are usually thinner too, and flex or conform better to the pulley. I don't know for a fact but I would think there is less tendancy for them to develop a memory when the belt is left tensioned and not moving as when the machine is turned off.

                      That's my best guess

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